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Giant Bones Audio Cassette – Aug 1 2002


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Product Details

  • Audio Cassette
  • Publisher: Blackstone Audiobooks; Unabridged edition (August 2002)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0786123117
  • ISBN-13: 978-0786123117
  • Product Dimensions: 24.1 x 16.8 x 3 cm
  • Shipping Weight: 386 g
  • Average Customer Review: 4.8 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (5 customer reviews)
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Customer Reviews

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Format: Mass Market Paperback
Set in the world of his previous book, "The Innkeeper's Song," Beagle presents six stand-alone fairy tales in this charming collection. All but one from first person perspective (Lal and Soukyan's last hurrah), Beagle continues to weave strange twists on old forms: the girl who would rather marry a thief, the powerful magician who had no love for power, two old mercenary partners who find a need for reconciliation, and - my favourite - the actors who are privy to a most unusual theatrical performance! As delightful and lyrical as these tales are, however, Beagle's world is bleak, leaving all his characters to live in a catch-as-catch can world. Beagle also feels no need to shrink from or tidy-up the language of his characters, as the first story eminently proves. While this excellent ear for the "voices" of the five story-tellers in this wonderful collection is more than appropriate but necessary to each story, young children who loved "The Last Unicorn" would be advised to wait a few years before delving into this enjoyable anthology.
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Format: Mass Market Paperback
Since all the stories in "Giant Bones" are either framed by some kind of first-person narrative or directly recounted by a participant-with the exception of "Lal and Soukyan," thus giving that story a particular distinction-reading the book is like nothing so much as spending an evening with a rich and peculiar cast of characters. The narrators are as varied as the tales they tell: an old woman paying a scribe to set down the truth, an old man in an inn telling stories with his friends, a traveling player commiserating with a fellow actor, the professional storyteller Choushi-wai regaling an audience with her favorite tale, and an impatient father recounting the family legend to his son. Each story has its own particular scope, from a disaster of a theatrical production to the clash of a power-hungry queen and a back-country magician, told in vivid, sympathetic prose to which is added the particular pungency of each narrator. Nor does the third-person style of "Lal and Soukyan" do anything to diminish its power. It's not exactly a sequel to "The Innkeeper's Song," as it answers almost none of the questions that the book's ending leaves for the readers to ponder, but it is a welcome reappearance for two beloved characters. By its very ending it seems to preclude any further "sequels" but regardless of its place in any kind of story cycle it's a very good short story and stands quite well on its own. More, it and the other the other five stories flesh out the world which was sketched so vividly, if not explored in depth, in "The Innkeeper's Song." Either as a sequel-of-sorts or as a stand-alone collection, "Giant Bones" is very good. And what more do you want out a book, anyway?
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By A Customer on Aug. 24 1998
Format: Mass Market Paperback
As usual, Mr. Beagle proves what a master he is at world-creation and character-generation (and his prose is lovely, as usual). Also as usual, the resolutions of the story just never merit their fabulous build-up. (The last three stories are somewhat better in this department than the first three--esp. "Giant Bones" and "Choushi-Wai's Story", tho' you'd expect more spice from any story with Lal and Soukyan in it, even if they are in their 80s, right?) The most glaring example of this was the third story, "The Tragical Historie of the Jiril's Players"--which was really, really good (pretty funny, too)...until the ending! I mean, the build-up is great, but you're so amused and interested in the Players, you kinda wish they'd play a larger role in the outcome! Oh, well. Anyway, despite all this (and they do get better as they go along), it's rare I've read a collection of worth-while fantasy short stories...but this is a good one!
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Format: Mass Market Paperback
Good fantasy is terribly difficult to find. Good short fiction is terribly difficult to find. Good fantasy short fiction does not exist. Or, it rarely does. Giant Bones is a welcome addition to this neglected, narrow genre. Even for those who have not read The Innkeeper's Song, these tales, brought to life in wonderous, traditional tale-telling style, will suprise and delight you. A few of them, such as "Lal and Soukyan" and "The Last Song of Sirit Byar" are not really suprising for those familiar with Beagle -- they feel like a return to a well-loved home. I found "Giant Bones" to be slightly tedious in its first-person style, moreso than Beagle's earlier work. But "The Magician of Karakosk," "The Tragical Historie of the Jiril's Players," (and I point out that the reviewers were wrong -- some of these characters are present in The Innkeeper's Song as well as Lal and Soukyan) and "Choushi-wai's Story" are spectacular in their lyrical telling. You may find yourself shocked that such simple stories seem vibrant and brilliantly alive. All of these stories are worth reading -- you may find yourself reading them more than once. Another excellent work by an excellent author.
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By A Customer on Aug. 24 1997
Format: Mass Market Paperback
Anyone whoever read THE INNKEEPER'S SONG by Peter S. Beagle will be delighted to hear about this new anthology of stories. With six new stories from the same fantasy world, each one unique and entertaining, Beagle practically reinvents modern fantasy. The tales are about bards, magicians, and aged mercenaries Lal and Soukyan, first seen in the THE INNKEEPER'S SONG.

GIANT BONES is a must for any any Peter S. Beagle fan. Even if you've never read his work before, this will be $12 well spent.

Casey Thomaston
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