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Girl Who Circumnavigated the Fairyland in a Ship of Her Own(CD)Lib(Un Audio CD – Audiobook, CD, Unabridged


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Mother's Day Stories for Kids



Product Details

  • Audio CD
  • Publisher: Brilliance Audio; Library edition (May 10 2011)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 9781441877611
  • ISBN-13: 978-1441877611
  • ASIN: 1441877614
  • Product Dimensions: 18.1 x 2.5 x 16.5 cm
  • Shipping Weight: 91 g
  • Average Customer Review: 4.8 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (5 customer reviews)

Product Description

Review

A glorious balancing act between modernism and the Victorian Fairy Tale, done with heart and wisdom. -- Neil Gaiman An Alice in Wonderland for the 21st century... So effortless, so vivid, so funny. Every page has a phrase or observation to savour and her characters are wondrous creations. Sunday Telegraph A charming modern fairytale...with a knowing twinkle in its eye Telegraph Bundles of imagination and wry wit... This is a sophisticated world of forfeits, paradoxes and tricks. Financial Times A mad, toothsome romp of a fairy tale - full of oddments, whimsy, and joy. -- Holly Black If you haven't heard of Catherynne Valente, give it time. She's only 32, and she's writing at a furious pace. Valente brings fathomless inventiveness to her fiction... A book for young adults, rich and strange enough for grown-ups, too. -- Lev Grossman A whole esoteric world of whimsy - Alice meets the Wizard of Oz meets the Persephone story with a whiff of Narnia. Independent on Sunday ...it is in fact one of the most extraordinary works of fantasy for adults or children so far this century. -- Lev Grossman Time Sweet fairytale, shot through with salty tears - magic! -- Cory Doctorow Get swept away by this charming book Vogue Pure escapism Bliss magazine --This text refers to the Paperback edition.

About the Author

Catherynne M. Valente began September’s adventures in installments on the Web; the project won legions of fans and also the CultureGeek Best Web Fiction of the Decade award. She lives with her husband on an island off the coast of Maine. She has written many novels for adults, but this is her children’s book debut.

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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By Coreena on June 21 2011
Format: Hardcover
This is a book I bought simply for the title - I thought it had to be good! It involves a girl going to Fairlyland, sounds good, and she makes her own ship, even better, she is active and can fend for herself. And then there is the cover, absolutely gorgeous and promises an enchanting book. I certainly was not disappointed.

The story starts with twelve year old September at home, bored with washing dishes and her ordinary life in Omaha - her father has left to go to war (WWI) and her mother works in the factory. The Green Wind sweeps in and offers to carry her off to Fairyland:

"You seem an ill-tempered and irascible enough child," said the Green Wind. "How would you like to come away with me and ride upon the Leopard of Little Breezes and be delivered to the great sea, which borders Fairyland? I am afraid I cannot go in, as Harsh Airs are not allowed, but I should be happy to deposit you upon the Perverse and Perilous Sea."
"Oh yes!" breathed September... (p.2)

And so September begins her adventures in Fairyland.

In Fairyland, September makes friends, especially with a Wyverary (half Wyvern and half library) named A-Through-L and a blue Marid boy named Saturday, amongst others. September is forced to go on a quest for the Marquess, a girl around her own age who governs Fairyland with strange rules and is feared by all.

This is a well told story, with an omnipotent narrator who frequently talks directly to the reader and lets them in on things that the characters do not know. There is a fun, Victorian, Alice in Wonderland air to the book which creates an old fashioned feel.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By EA Solinas HALL OF FAMETOP 50 REVIEWER on May 1 2011
Format: Hardcover
Every child wants to be whisked away to a magical land, have adventures, and set out on a fantastical quest against a tyrant.

It's a pretty typical fantasy storyline as well, and it takes something special to make such stories stand out. Catherynne Valente's "The Girl Who Circumnavigated Fairyland in a Ship of Her Own Making" is an enchanting example, filled with delightful nonsense, wryly witty prose, and a wonderfully oddball world that reminds me of a more lyrical Lewis Carroll.

A young girl named September is whisked away from her boring Nebraska home by the Green Wind, who takes her to Fairyland. But September soon finds herself traveling through Fairyland herself, encountering a soap golem, a half-library wyvern named A-Through-L, a wairwulf, the Perverse and Perilous Sea with its golden beaches, The House Without Warning, gnomish customs agents, a jeweled key, a migration of bicycles.

She also is given a quest by a pair of witches -- find the magical spoon that the cruel Marquess stole from their dead brothers. So she and the Wyverary set out to the city of Pandemonium, but soon find themselves (and a flying leopard named Saturday) on a new quest, with overwhelming results for all the people of Fairyland.

Normally, Catherynne Valente has a lush, lyrical, sensual writing style, and there's a fair amount of that in this book ("... the moon slowly fall down into the horizon and all the dark morning stars turn in the sky like a silver carousel"). Her Fairyland is a weird, sometimes dangerous place filled with countless oddball creatures (migrating bicycles!), making her story feel like a more plotcentric "Alice in Wonderland.
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By Becky on Feb. 1 2015
Format: Paperback
This is what I wrote to my friend immediately after finishing this book:
"I have another book for you, if you are interested. Kendra and Andre lent it to me because they thought I could do with some healing. It's called "The Girl who Circumnavigated Fairyland in a Ship of her Own Making" by Catherynne Valente.
It's about a little girl who gets ravished to fairyland.
It's... how to describe it... thoughtful, hard, and loving. Not hard like the last one was hard [A Monster Calls]. This one is like curling into the lap of one who loves you while they pet your hair and explain that life is very difficult and despite what Frodo might say, we must always be torn in two. It's like being held safe under the covers but knowing you can't stay there forever. You have to get up soon, but when you do, it will be with the strength you are building while you're there.
It's the Fairyland I grew up with. The terror, the mystery, the desire, the longing... It's a fairyland that has been made safe for children, but at the same time, it is not at all safe for children.
It's lovely, it's the first of a series, and maybe you will find it comforting in a "this has nothing to do with anything in my life, and yet has everything to do with my life" sort of way."

When I was a child, we had a creek that ran through our farm, and we mustn't play near the spring because springs are an entrance to Fairy. My father loves stories, and I lived a good part of my youth half fearing-half wishing to be ravished away to fairyland. Never brave enough to try to stumble through, partly for fear that if I failed, it would mean it wasn't real after all.
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