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The Girl's Guide to Being a Boss (Without Being a Bitch) Paperback – May 1 2007


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Product Details

  • Paperback: 240 pages
  • Publisher: Crown Business; 1 edition (May 1 2007)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0767922859
  • ISBN-13: 978-0767922852
  • Product Dimensions: 13.2 x 1.6 x 20.3 cm
  • Shipping Weight: 181 g
  • Average Customer Review: 4.5 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (2 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: #127,472 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Product Description

From Publishers Weekly

Since the early 1980s, studies have shown that the techniques utilized by successful men in leadership roles do not have the same effects when practiced by women in similar contexts. It is commonly known that when a woman behaves like her male counterpart, she is often negatively labeled as cold, tough, etc. In addition, women have fewer female role models to whom they can turn for advice and assistance. Friedman and Yorio help readers through this dilemma by compiling personal anecdotes, pop culture references and an array of interviews with female leaders in various fields in an attempt to offer the support and encouragement women need to excel as leaders. The authors state that the patience, strength, wisdom, resourcefulness and nurturance that society cultivates in women might actually make females better managers than males. The book is filled with numerous examples of management styles as well as quizzes to determine if the reader is a "Good Witch" or a "Bad Bitch" with regard to her own leadership skills. Leaders of any gender will find solace in reading these stories from the trenches and may learn some new tips to improve on their own leadership skills as well. (Apr. 4)
Copyright © Reed Business Information, a division of Reed Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved. --This text refers to the Hardcover edition.

From School Library Journal

Adult/High School–This crash course in management covers the gamut in perky prose, from hiring to firing and everything in between. The authors provide examples of their principles with stories from their experiences as bosses and with reports of other female executives. Interviews with successful businesswomen add insight into techniques on which the chapter focuses. Other stories about bosses who were either good witches or bad bitches provide juicy anecdotes. Not all issues will apply to every teen in a leadership position, but young women will find this a handy guide. Whether student-body president or yearbook editor, or at work in another environment, teens will find tools, techniques, and advice that they can use to lead people more efficiently and effectively.–Jane S. Drabkin, Chinn Park Regional Library, Woodbridge, VA
Copyright © Reed Business Information, a division of Reed Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved. --This text refers to the Hardcover edition.

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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By S. Winsor on Oct. 28 2009
Format: Paperback
I was an outsider in a certain company, meaning I did not climb the ladder like other girls in my company did. I wanted respect from everyone, but didn't want to be a jerk either. This was also my first manager job as all previous jobs I'd had were assitant managers.

A year later after reading this book, I can honestly say I am the first boss at my store that has lasted this long AND had the lowest turnover from staff and I think it all stems from reading this book. It IS tough at time to be the boss, especially if I like all my staff, but this book has helped during several incidents at my workplace.

I highly recommend.
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Format: Paperback
This book is well written and easy to read with lots of real-world examples. It would be great for someone new to their career with her eye on a management position needing some tips on how to get started. For those readers, I'd give the book 4 stars.

However, much of the content will be obvious to someone who has worked in the industry for a while and has had any success with leadership. For those readers, I'd recommend The New Leader's 100-Day Action Plan instead, which is more advanced.
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Most Helpful Customer Reviews on Amazon.com (beta)

Amazon.com: 39 reviews
24 of 26 people found the following review helpful
Female manager May 22 2006
By Eugenia - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Hardcover
As a first time manager, I was thrilled to see advertisement for this book. It really was the title that attracted me to it. I was delighted to learn that my intuition about my employees behavior was not my imagination, and this book nailed it. It was interesting to read about people behavior, gossip, reluctunce of male counterparts to cooperate in workplace. This easy to read book was pure blessing with its down to earth advice and excellent reference index. Once I finished reading this book, I was able to continue my management education thru referring to other book materials that address leadership issues and what is means to be a female manager. This is great book for both managers and employees. It does not matter is you work in corporate world or you own your business. Advice from this book applies to all work environments.
31 of 36 people found the following review helpful
Some Valuable Advice - and Some Things to Ignore April 8 2008
By Lisa Shea - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Paperback
The full name of this book is The Girl's Guide to Being a Boss (Without Being a Bitch). The title bothers me - it seems a marketing ploy to catch people's attention while perpetuating a stereotype which is more suitable to the 1980s than the current decade. There are thousands of great female bosses out there. Over half of all graduate students are female. I've worked for many companies and never have had a problem because I'm female - or had a problem with females in management.

That being said, I know many women have trouble in a position of power - and I know that some people still have an issue with women being *in* power. Heck, there are still people around who look down on people for having dark skin. So if this book helps people in that situation, it's doing a good thing.

One indicator of the mindset of the authors is that the book is about 200 pages long - but they explain that they originally had a chapter on "why being a boss sucks" and that one chapter ALONE was over 200 pages and had to be drastically trimmed. What an awful attitude to have!! That's like having a book for moms with a gigantic chapter on "why being a mom sucks". As we all know, the things you focus on end up being the things that take over your life. If you focus on all the awful things about being a boss, that is not a healthy way of living. Heck, why not choose a different career path then, one that does not involve management, if you truly hate being a boss so much? Some people simply are more happy not having control over others. That is fine.

I'm not saying that you should ignore the challenges of being a boss. Certainly, there are challenges! But they are simply skills you need to learn to master, not "being a boss sucks" situations.

What are some of the challenges? The book tells you that as a woman you are likely to "freak out" and must not do that. You must take responsibility for your team, on caring well for them. You have to give credit to them, not steal it from them. You have to stay "consistent, loyal and unbiased". You have to be firm but fair. Learn to delegate.

The book tells you these things via little stories, and by proving lists. For example, as a boss you should post this above your desk: make a to-do list, set goals, stick to deadlines, keep your word, get it in writing, be proactive, think of the entire company, contribute to your team, focus on the big picture, be your own cheerleader, sell yourself stick up for yourself, don't be personal, network, and find a mentor. The book gives you little mantras. Give constructive feedback, not personal criticism. Leave everyone's self esteem intact.

However, the book is not as great at providing actual solutions. It sends you a lot of messages, but does not provide a lot of concrete help. It says many times to be calm, cool and collected at all times - but doesn't give any advice for women who are emotional. It tells you not to be friends with your subordinates, not to drink with co-workers, and (I kid you not) to have all of your minions snap to attention when you enter a meeting room. It apparently is a bad sign if they keep talking when you enter, rather than all looking immediately to you and waiting with hushed breath for your next precious word.

I definitely agree that many of the suggestions here are good ones, if common sense. Praise in public, criticize in private. Don't focus on blame, focus on improving and fixing things. If you apologize, apologize specifically "I am very sorry for xxxxxx" rather than generically.

And I suppose if for some women the "chatty girl" approach of the book gets across a message that they did not understand or absorb otherwise, that is a good thing. We all learn in different ways, and we all have different styles.

Still, it bothers me that women would focus on the mindset of "I have to be careful not to be a bitch" - or that women would focus on the "being a boss sucks" idea. Again, if you have something stuck in your mind, it affects how you act and how others act towards you. It is far more productive to focus on "being a mentor to others is a fantastic opportunity" - and then find ways to make that happen and to handle any challenges that stand in your way. I would much rather see more books come out with that focus.
27 of 31 people found the following review helpful
Not a lot of practical advice Jan. 8 2007
By Tribe Pride - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Hardcover
I was excited about this book, as its subject matter addressed an issue I've struggled with recently--transitioning to being someone's boss.

I was disappointed. It made a lot of solid statements, but didn't give a lot of good advice on how to implement their suggestions. For example, the authors stated that many women cry at work, and one should never be seen crying. But the book offers no suggestions on how to prevent yourself from crying as a reaction to difficult suggestions, right after saying it is a problem a lot of women face. Same with handling the difficulty of giving negative feedback to someone--they say it is a hard thing for many people to do, but don't offer much in the way of how to overcome that difficulty.

Hopefully someone else will write an improved version of this, with real, tangible advice.
11 of 12 people found the following review helpful
Easy, Fun & Inspiring reading April 20 2006
By Chris Colabella - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Hardcover
I related to this book on many levels. I'm not only a woman who owns her own business, but I have several female Managers who report to me. This book reminded me of the self-doubt that I experienced early on in my career and the long process of creating a management style that I am both proud of and comfortable with. It inspired me to become a better mentor to those who work for me.
10 of 11 people found the following review helpful
Bitches, man April 19 2006
By Hostess with the Mostest - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Hardcover
I bet any woman in the workforce will not only have female bosses from hell stories, but will also be able to recount times when they've been accused of attitude when that really was not the case. Is it possible for a woman to be powerful without being a bitch? Yes. Is it always the case that nice girls don't get the corner office? Not at all. Is this hard thing to pull off? Most definitely. But this new book makes it much easier with sound advice, true stories from an array of businesswomen, and tips for how to be a good (and successful)"chick-in-charge." And with more women working, more female bosses and more chiquitas owning businesses than ever before, it's a necessary book.


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