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Glory In The Name: A Novel of the Confederate Navy Paperback – Apr 1 2004


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Product Details

  • Paperback: 432 pages
  • Publisher: Harper Perennial; Reprint edition (April 1 2004)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0060959053
  • ISBN-13: 978-0060959050
  • Product Dimensions: 13.5 x 2.5 x 20.3 cm
  • Shipping Weight: 318 g
  • Average Customer Review: 4.7 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (7 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: #1,221,075 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Product Description

From Publishers Weekly

Nelson (By Force of Arms), the author of two nautical series, offers an exciting stand-alone naval warfare adventure. This time his hero is an officer in the battered and ill-equipped Confederate Navy during the American Civil War. Shortly after the fall of Fort Sumter in 1861, Lt. Samuel Bowater resigns his commission in the U.S. Navy, torn between his pledge of loyalty to the Union and his loyalty to his home state, South Carolina. Aided by his family's influence and his previous military experience, he joins the fledgling Confederate Navy, where he is assigned to be captain of an old steam-powered tugboat converted into a gunboat. Like all of Nelson's captains, Bowater is bright, brave, resourceful and disciplined. His crew, however, is a motley collection of landsmen and sailors, men who fall under the influence of the enigmatic chief engineer, Hieronymus Taylor, the violin-playing dictator of the engine room. With the old gunboat and an unpredictable crew, Bowater is at quite a disadvantage in his battles with the powerful Union navy, especially during the spectacular battle for Roanoke Island. Meanwhile, a Mississippi plantation owner, Robley Paine, loses his three sons at the first battle of Bull Run, and he devises a crazy scheme to protect the river frontage of his property. Bowater, Taylor and the crew team up with Paine in a futile defense of New Orleans. This solid story is filled with Civil War and naval history, focusing on steam-powered warships and ironclads and on the courage of men who sailed into shot and shell for a hopeless cause. Nelson also adds suspense, romance and a bit of mystery, leaving plenty of room for the obvious sequel.
Copyright 2003 Reed Business Information, Inc. --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

About the Author

James L. Nelson has served as a seaman, rigger, boatswain, and officer on a number of sailing vessels. He is the author of By Force of Arms, The Maddest Idea, The Continental Risque, Lords of the Ocean, and All the Brave Fellows -- the five books of his Revolution at Sea Saga. -- as well as The Guardship: Book One of the Brethren of the Coast. He lives with his wife and children in Harpswell, Maine.


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First Sentence
Oil on canvas, in his signature fine brushstroke, Samuel Bowater painted the opening shot of the War for Southern Independence. Read the first page
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Customer Reviews

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Format: Hardcover
"Ironclads at sea, armies moving by rail, communicating by telegraph. Rifled cannons, rifled rifles, exploding ordinance." They were all Americans, like it or not, all children of that particular genius that was America. How apt then that in less than a year of war, Americans fighting Americans, they should forever alter forever the very nature of warfare."
That paragraph, found late in this marvelous book, truly frames the story that plays out between it's covers.
It comes from a perspective that many of us find at least different and sometimes uncomfortable. It is a story of the Confederate Navy and is told with sympathy and understanding as well as painstaking historical attention to fact.
Samual Bowater, a former officer in the United States Navy has resigned his commission to return to his home, the Confederacy and seeks to help in the only way he knows how, by seeking to serve as a naval officer. He watches from a distance and paints the scene as Fort Sumter is fired on and the Civil War begins.
Robey Paine, a man of Mississippi with three sons to send to fight for the Confederacy believes that all of them have been lost in battle. A certian madness is the result, which will find him commissioning the conversion of a ship to an ironclad and leads him to the discovery that one of his som's has survived.
This is a moving story of a small part of the Civil War which shows it's horror and it's passion in way that is compelling.
Although I live in Maine, as does the author - about 25 miles from me - I was unaware of his writing until this book was recommended to my wife by an insightful bookstore clerk as a Christmas present for me. It is, I believe, the best book I have read in quite some time and it has already started me ordering other books written by James Nelson and looking forward to his next effort. I would give it ten stars if I could.
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Format: Hardcover
This is the first book in a new series about the Civil War.
The Civil War, the first war of the Industrial Revolution in this
country, was a war of transition. The massed tactics of the
Napoleonic Wars were made obsolete by the rifled musket.
The U.S. Rifle Musket Model 1861, informally known as the
Springfield, because it was made at the Springfield Arsenal
in Springfield, Massachusetts. It was also the Second American Revolution. At four thirty A.M., on the morning of April 12, 1861, a pull of a lanyard began the Civil War. That was the time it began. That was the time when Fort Sumter
in Charleston Harbor, was attacked. However, it's not about the Confederate Army. If you want to read a series about the
Confederate Army, then read John Jakes' North And South. This is a book, series, actually, about a little-known service in the Civil War, the Confederate States Navy. The CSN, according to the Historical Note at the back of the book, was
founded in February 1861, but had more ships than it did men to serve on them. Why? Very few Southern naval officers resigned their comissions, compared to their Army
brethren. This is the story of one of them. Samuel Bowater was a lieutenant in the U.S. Navy until the attack on Fort Sumter. He resigned his commission in the U.S. Navy and took command of an armed tugboat, and later, an armed riverboat. Nelson covers the problems and privations of life
in the CSN. Bowater hopes that he'll be compared to the greats of naval history, including Lord Nelson, and that the
Confederate States Navy will be remembered. Well, the CSN is all but forgotten today, and the reason why is simple.
Times had changed. 1861 wasn't 1775.
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By A Customer on Oct. 28 2003
Format: Hardcover
I couldn't wait for James L. Nelson's next book. I was even more pumped when I found out it was about the American Civil War. Nelson has given us the Revolutionary War at sea, which has been seldom written about, and also a great pirate series. Now for another nautical subject that hasn't been novelized very frequently.
Don't miss this one! It is a fabulous adventure. Being from the "North" I was a little sorry that the protaganoist was a Confederate, but Nelson is nothing if not even handed. He gives credit where credit is due and realizes that there was honor and glory as well as shame and stupidity on both sides. It is that element that makes his books both more complex and more enjoyable than your standard nautical adventure.
What also sets Nelson apart from so many historical novelists in general is a terrific sense of humor. There is blood and thunder galore, here, but also some laugh out loud moments. His characters live and breathe, and they themselves laugh as well as curse the horror and folly of war. And the main character Bowater gets into terrific situations only to think his way out of them in splendid fashion.
Nelson just gets better and better, and he started out near the top of the nautical heap, to be sure. It is such a pleasure to have a contemporary author that one can follow and whose books one can look forward to.
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Format: Hardcover
Now it can be shouted - James L. Nelson is America's premiere writer of nautical adventure as well as a terrific purveyor of historic fiction! CONGRATULATIONS MR. NELSON FOR A WELL DESERVED AWARD - THE WILLIAM BOYD AWARD FOR BEST MILITARY FICTION OF 2004!!!! Anyone who craves more reading on the Civil War, who loves nautical fiction, or who just wants to read the work of a fine stylist should not miss any of James L. Nelson's novels and particularly not miss this, his latest that won over a panel of judges in a crowded field of contenders. When you combined sharply researched history with memorable characters, gripping action, and lace it all with a dose of Nelsonian wit and humor you can't lose. Enjoy!!!!
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