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Godshome Paperback – Jan 1 2000


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Product Details

  • Paperback: 256 pages
  • Publisher: Tor Books; First Edition edition (Jan. 1 2000)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0312868030
  • ISBN-13: 978-0312868031
  • Product Dimensions: 14 x 1.8 x 21.1 cm
  • Shipping Weight: 454 g
  • Average Customer Review: 2.5 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (4 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: #3,446,077 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Product Description

From Publishers Weekly

A master of humorous SF and fantasy tackles, with only moderate success, the old tale of human desperation leading to war among the gods. In Florida, Professor of Comparative Mythology Arthur Fenn, facing financial ruin due to unsuccessful stock speculation, uses the spell that allowed King Solomon to communicate with the gods and his own academic knowledge to travel to Godshome, a nursing home for retired and crippled deities. Fenn hopes to find a High God who can help him out of his difficulties, but the only one willing is a trickster named Leafie. When some of Leafie's less pleasant friends show up to help found the New Awesome Religion of the Wonderful Ancient Gods (NARWAG), Fenn realizes that losing his fiancee and having to become a televangelist are only the beginning of his troubles. Indeed, the High Gods know that the fabric of the universe is in danger. The less humorous second half of the novel concerns the High Gods' scattershot efforts to keep the universe intact. Afflicted with adolescent-style cynicism, jerky pacing and a good deal of silliness, Sheckley's (The Alternative Detective) latest fails to measure up to his usual standard.
Copyright 1998 Reed Business Information, Inc. --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

From Library Journal

When mythology professor Arthur Fenn finds himself facing financial disaster, he invites a bevy of forgotten deities to Earth to solve his dilemma?a move that plunges the universe into chaos. Though a few witty moments enliven this tale of the return of the lesser gods, Sheckley's tongue-in-cheek fantasy suffers from a haphazard plot and lackluster characters. A marginal purchase for large libraries.
Copyright 1999 Reed Business Information, Inc. --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

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Customer Reviews

2.5 out of 5 stars
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Most helpful customer reviews

Format: Hardcover
Those who have arrived at Robert Sheckley's literary doorstep via one of his t.v. or movie-based science fiction serial novels (Deep Space Nine, Aliens, Babylon 5) are sure to experience major disorientation with "Godshome." But those who are already acquainted with the brilliantly original writing of this masterful, erudite nutcase will be delighted to encounter vintage Sheckley--complete with a shaggy dog storyline, chuckleheaded characters, and biting, unrelenting, Swiftian wit. Robert Sheckley is to science fiction what Botticelli was to the Renaissance--a maverick original who's impossible to compare with anyone else in his time, but without whom, the era would be less rich. With "Godshome," Sheckley is not content merely to satirize human folly; he brazenly satirizes existence and the very universe itself, by pairing together, as he always does, mundanity and magnitude in a wacky cosmic tango. "Godshome" is a fun, thoughtful read and I highly recommend it.
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Format: Hardcover
My immediate thought after finishing this book was that Robert Sheckley should apologize for wasting so many words. While well-written, this book was a disappointment to say the least, and irritating to say the most. It jumps from Neat Concept to Neat Concept without bothering to do more than touch upon them briefly. We're dragged from one scene to the next in a careless, offhanded fashion. Characters appear onstage, have a few lines, and are gone, without any sort of depth to them. It's like channel-surfing on a ten-second interval, which is about how long some of the chapters take to read. The book moves with increasing speed, tossing plot to the wind in an increasingly frustrating way, with little rhyme or reason, culminating in a mindbogglingly confusing ending which leaves a lot to be desired. I will admit, however, that it's a well-written book. It just left me unsatisfied and frustrated. As a parody, or a comment on the way the universe works, it's a good read. As a serious work of fiction, it's not. Robert Sheckley tosses away more good concepts, any of which could hold a book up on their own, than some authors use in an entire trilogy. Ultimately, I must admit that I don't regret reading this book. I merely regret spending the money to buy it in hardback. Casual readers, be thus advised.
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Format: Paperback
Robert Sheckley has written some great, absurd satire, so I'm interested when he comes up with something new. I enjoyed the early chapters of this book, but as it went along, it simply lost focus, randomly introducing and abandoning characters and situations. It was clever in many ways, but the disintegrating structure lost me.
Sheckley wrote many short stories in the 1950's and 60's, and some say those were his best work. It has probably always been a challenge for him to hold a long story together. But some of his novels have been great -- my favorites are "Mindswap" and "Journey of Joenes". Most of his work is out of print, but it's worth looking for if you've got a taste for the absurd.
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By A Customer on Jan. 21 1999
Format: Hardcover
This book had some interesting ideas and situations in it, but the author never bothered to bring closure to any of it. The focus shifts bewilderingly from character to character without much in the way of a unifying plot to it. The final pages are a stopping point rather than an ending or resolution. It was extremely frustrating to have spent the time reading this book, only to seemingly watch the whole thing come apart by the finish and result in nothing.
I won't be reading this author in the future. And I'd suggest the publisher hire better editors.
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Most Helpful Customer Reviews on Amazon.com (beta)

Amazon.com: 4 reviews
3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
Amusing, but ultimately unsatisfying Jan. 3 1999
By Michael M. Jones (everbard@ix.netcom.com) - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Hardcover
My immediate thought after finishing this book was that Robert Sheckley should apologize for wasting so many words. While well-written, this book was a disappointment to say the least, and irritating to say the most. It jumps from Neat Concept to Neat Concept without bothering to do more than touch upon them briefly. We're dragged from one scene to the next in a careless, offhanded fashion. Characters appear onstage, have a few lines, and are gone, without any sort of depth to them. It's like channel-surfing on a ten-second interval, which is about how long some of the chapters take to read. The book moves with increasing speed, tossing plot to the wind in an increasingly frustrating way, with little rhyme or reason, culminating in a mindbogglingly confusing ending which leaves a lot to be desired. I will admit, however, that it's a well-written book. It just left me unsatisfied and frustrated. As a parody, or a comment on the way the universe works, it's a good read. As a serious work of fiction, it's not. Robert Sheckley tosses away more good concepts, any of which could hold a book up on their own, than some authors use in an entire trilogy. Ultimately, I must admit that I don't regret reading this book. I merely regret spending the money to buy it in hardback. Casual readers, be thus advised.
3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
Not worth the time Jan. 21 1999
By A Customer - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Hardcover
This book had some interesting ideas and situations in it, but the author never bothered to bring closure to any of it. The focus shifts bewilderingly from character to character without much in the way of a unifying plot to it. The final pages are a stopping point rather than an ending or resolution. It was extremely frustrating to have spent the time reading this book, only to seemingly watch the whole thing come apart by the finish and result in nothing.
I won't be reading this author in the future. And I'd suggest the publisher hire better editors.
2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
It has its moments, but overall disjoint and unfocused July 27 2000
By David Rolfe - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Paperback
Robert Sheckley has written some great, absurd satire, so I'm interested when he comes up with something new. I enjoyed the early chapters of this book, but as it went along, it simply lost focus, randomly introducing and abandoning characters and situations. It was clever in many ways, but the disintegrating structure lost me.
Sheckley wrote many short stories in the 1950's and 60's, and some say those were his best work. It has probably always been a challenge for him to hold a long story together. But some of his novels have been great -- my favorites are "Mindswap" and "Journey of Joenes". Most of his work is out of print, but it's worth looking for if you've got a taste for the absurd.
1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
Wonderful, absurdist nonsense from a master satirist! Sept. 15 1999
By A Customer - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Hardcover
Those who have arrived at Robert Sheckley's literary doorstep via one of his t.v. or movie-based science fiction serial novels (Deep Space Nine, Aliens, Babylon 5) are sure to experience major disorientation with "Godshome." But those who are already acquainted with the brilliantly original writing of this masterful, erudite nutcase will be delighted to encounter vintage Sheckley--complete with a shaggy dog storyline, chuckleheaded characters, and biting, unrelenting, Swiftian wit. Robert Sheckley is to science fiction what Botticelli was to the Renaissance--a maverick original who's impossible to compare with anyone else in his time, but without whom, the era would be less rich. With "Godshome," Sheckley is not content merely to satirize human folly; he brazenly satirizes existence and the very universe itself, by pairing together, as he always does, mundanity and magnitude in a wacky cosmic tango. "Godshome" is a fun, thoughtful read and I highly recommend it.

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