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Going for the One (Expanded) Original recording remastered


Price: CDN$ 13.43 & FREE Shipping on orders over CDN$ 25. Details
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30 new from CDN$ 6.14 11 used from CDN$ 6.99

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Frequently Bought Together

Going for the One (Expanded) + Yes Album + Close to the Edge
Price For All Three: CDN$ 82.92

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Product Details

  • Audio CD (Aug. 26 2003)
  • Number of Discs: 1
  • Format: Original recording remastered
  • Label: Rhino-Atlantic
  • ASIN: B00007LTIC
  • Other Editions: Audio CD  |  Audio Cassette  |  LP Record
  • Average Customer Review: 4.6 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (99 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: #7,854 in Music (See Top 100 in Music)

1. Going For The One
2. Turn Of The Century
3. Parallels
4. Wonderous Stories
5. Awaken
6. Montreux's Theme
7. Vevey (Revisited)
8. Amazing Grace
9. Going For The One
10. Parallels
11. Turn Of The Century
12. Eastern Numbers (Early Version of Awaken)

Product Description

Product Description

Bonus tracks: Montreux's Theme; Vevey (revisited); Amazing Grace , and the unissued Going for the One (rehearsal); Parallels (rehearsal); Turn of the Century (rehearsal), and Eastern Numbers (early version of Awaken )!

Amazon.ca

In 1977, with England still in the throes of the punk explosion, and art-rock becoming a decidedly unfashionable commodity, the longstanding progressive-rock institution Yes was making some of the most inventive and energetic music of its career on Going for the One. The album--which marked the return of star keyboardist Rick Wakeman to the band--features the hit "Wondrous Stories", one of frontman Jon Anderson's most limpid acoustic ballads. Elsewhere, the propulsive title track and the hyperactive "Parallels" find the band flirting with dissonance, belying Yes's image as a hidebound dinosaur. Elsewhere, the 16-minute "Awaken" ranks with the band's most ambitious long-form extravaganzas. --Scott Schinder --This text refers to an alternate Audio CD edition.

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Customer Reviews

4.6 out of 5 stars

Most helpful customer reviews

5 of 5 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on April 8 2004
Format: Audio CD
The title for this review is the reason keyboardist Rick Wakeman gave as his reason for rejoing Yes. Although I realize that Rick wasn't into what he considered Yes's "avante garde" direction post Close To The Edge, I personally feel that the more streamlined approach to song making on Going For The One is less interesting. It always seemed to me that Yes never did do "songs", in the sense that their compositions were creatively elongated while usually remaining impressively cohesive. Certainly there was some loss of form on Topographic and Relayer due to overextenion of motifs, but that's the downside to ambition. The upside is that because Yes pushed themselves so hard, I believe the successes on those albums outweighed the flaws. I'm inclined to think the best stuff on GFTO also wins out, its just too bad that by this time the band members seem to be trying a bit too hard to recapture the balance between accessible, hook-layden melodies and expansive instrumental probing. For instance, the epic 'Awaken' strikes me as having been built to sound epic, whereas 'Close To The Edge, Yes's first epic, had a sense of discovery about it simply because, as former Yes drummer Bill Bruford put it, "...as we were making it I don't think anyone really knew how we were going to finish it." By now, in revisiting their own musical past with Wakeman, Yes, in effect had formalized their own secret to success, which was that their synergy was of unplanned intent. They had a naturally occuring synergy together, and the more they tinkered with it, the more they lost, as the album after GFTO, Tormato, demonstrates.Read more ›
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5 of 5 people found the following review helpful By Gerard Sparaco on Sept. 4 2003
Format: Audio CD
This album was my introduction to Yes way back in 1977. I owned the vinyl, I own the recent remaster, but this edition completely and utterly makes them obsolete. I hoped the new mastering would be good, but not this good! I actually heard noises and sounds in the songs that I never heard (like Jon humming along to Howe's solo in "Parallels").
The sound quality alone should enough to convince you to replace any previous version. But the extra tracks and the insightful liner notes are icing on the cake. "Montreaux's Theme" and "Amazing Grace" were previously released. "Vevey (Revisited)", released in an edited form in the past, in here in full. The rehersals, especially for the vastly underrated "Turn of the Century" are really great.
It's about time that we have a Yes renaissance, and picking up the original studio albums with this quality (and at this price) are a great way to begin.
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful By Gregory J. Bendokus on Dec 18 2003
Format: Audio CD
Other people have done a fine job here explaining why this album is essential, so I won't even go there. Atlantic released this album on CD three times and none of them even come sonically CLOSE to this version. Even if you have multiple copies of this on CD already, this one is the goods. Listen to the title track through headphones and you'll quickly realize that even the best Atlantic CD version of this album sounds like a cassette. On this version, all the grunge is gone, the bottom end is much tighter, and there is actually air around the instruments now. I don't know how Rhino does it, I'm just glad they did. Can't wait for Drama!
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By Evil Lincoln on Sept. 21 2003
Format: Audio CD
1977's Going For The One, in my opinion, was Yes's least "progressive" and most "artsy" work of the 70's. And even though the album consists of mostly 4-8 minute songs (hardly the norm for Yes) it still takes as many listens to fully appreciate as albums like Close To The Edge or Relayer. But with the addition of seven (!) bonus tracks and a much, MUCH crisper sound than any previous edition, this remaster deserves to be in the collection of any self-respecting rock fan.
The least dissonant and most accessible songs on the album are 'Turn Of The Century' and 'Wonderous Stories.' Both songs feature Steve Howe's remarkable prowess on the acoustic guitar. 'Turn Of The Century' features exceptionally moving performances from Howe and singer Jon Anderson- in fact it's probably Anderson's most emotional vocal in the entire Yes canon. I don't listen to this track much, mostly because of its 8-minute length, which is quite prodigious for a song that's 90% acoustic. 'Wonderous Stories' is a good indication of what The Yes Album might have sounded like had keyboardist Rick Wakeman performed on it (it's also a good indication that Jon Anderson doesn't know how to spell *wondrous*). Wakeman's Moog washes over the chorus are very cool. The song features the vachalia, which Howe used on TYA's 'I've Seen All Good People.' It's a pithy, pleasant little ditty.
The title track is a wonderful tune, and next to 'Tempus Fugit' (from 1980's awesome Drama) it's my favorite short-form Yes song. It's very artsy and dissonant, but definitely grows on you after two or three listens. There's not much "progressive" about the song, other than Howe's use of a steel guitar all the way through. He gives one hell of an awesome solo from 2:05-2:40, which is the highlight of the song for me.
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