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Going Rate [Paperback]

John Brady
3.3 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (3 customer reviews)
List Price: CDN$ 24.95
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Book Description

Oct. 27 2008 1552787397 978-1552787397
Ireland's Hundred Thousand Welcomes continues to draw waves of immigrants and refugees to its still-roaring 'Celtic Tiger' economy . In Dublin's teeming streets, every second person seems to be Polish.  For those hundreds of thousands of Poles - Catholic, hard-working, white and like the Irish, survivors of an overbearing neighbour -  Ireland works. But the Tiger devours too, and barely a week in Ireland, 20 year old Tadeusz Klos lies in a coma on the rainswept streets of Ireland's capital.  He will not survive. This beating death is a new low, a tipping point. Gang violence and brazen shootings have already made Dublin's streets a battleground this last decade. This year gang on gang murders have escalated. Now, with outrage in the press in Poland and Ireland, the Gardai - Ireland's police - must come up with answers. Violent crime in Dublin is out of control, editorials declare. Can a team of Guards from a city station really do the job? And should the fabled specialist Murder Squad really have been disbanded three years ago?  Minogue is suddenly in demand, both for his background in that Murder Squad and for his current work in the Garda International Liaison office. 'Whatever you need' Minogue is told, but his arrival is resented in the local city Garda station. With little to go on, Minogue first forms a picture of a chance event, with bad timing, a swarm of drunken youths and racism. And Tadeusz Klos was no angel: this wayward and restless only child was involved in petty crime back in Poland. Ready or not, Minogue is about to  drop down a crevasse into Dublin's underworld.  There, not far from the busy world-class shopping and the crowded nightclubs, the glass clad offices tower and the massive rock concerts, is where drug lords and their hired killers rule.

Product Details


Product Description

About the Author

A native of Dublin, John Brady divides his time between Ireland and Canada, where John and his wife raise their family. He is the author of the Arthur Ellis award-winning Inspector Matt Minogue series. ISLANDBRIDGE was shortlisted for the Dashall Hammett prize.

Customer Reviews

3.3 out of 5 stars
3.3 out of 5 stars
Most helpful customer reviews
5.0 out of 5 stars The Going Rate June 13 2013
Format:Kindle Edition
This is another excellent mystery by John Brady. The characters are complex. The plot is complex. The result is excellent. A great read. Go Raibh Maith Agat!
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3.0 out of 5 stars Too Much Realism? Aug. 19 2011
By Debra Purdy Kong TOP 500 REVIEWER
Format:Paperback
When a Polish immigrant is found beaten to death on the streets of Dublin, officer Matt Minogue is asked to investigate. Meanwhile, aspiring screen writer, Dermot Fanning, is busily researching Dublin's crime scene. Fanning wants realism in his work, and gets more than he bargained for by witnessing a barbaric dog fight (this will be hard for animal lovers to read), among other things.

I have mixed feelings about this book. Details about the grittier aspects of Dublin are terrific, Minogue's character is well drawn, and the author nicely balances the personal lives of characters with the main plot. The problem was that Fanning's lack of common sense is so annoying that I found myself speed reading through his chapters, hoping to return to Minogue's story. Minogue's investigation became disappointing as well. Too many pages are spent interviewing surly, uncooperative teens who might, or might not, know how the victim died. These scenes slow the pace and, at times, actually diminish the tension with repetitious dialogue. Happily, the action picks up again near the end but, as in real police investigations, it seems to take a long time to get results in this 360 page novel.
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0 of 3 people found the following review helpful
2.0 out of 5 stars The Going Rate Nov. 15 2010
By Geta
Format:Paperback
Sorry, I can not read this book. I find it extremely confusing, and so much small talk stops the plot from moving along.
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Most Helpful Customer Reviews on Amazon.com (beta)
Amazon.com: 2.8 out of 5 stars  4 reviews
3.0 out of 5 stars The going rate May 21 2013
By Clare O'Beara - Published on Amazon.com
Format:Paperback
Another crime tale set in Dublin.
Sadly this is not a patch on Brady's earlier works. I blame the editor, or apparent lack of one. The production of the book is not great either: the print is ragged right edge instead of justified making it hard to read. The tale is about twice as long as it needs to be and we get chapter after chapter covering the same scenes, such as questioning four young people and their smart legal-aid lawyer and getting nothing out of them for hours on end, just because there aren't any other witnesses the police have found yet. (Hint to writers; you can skip ahead you know!) There are also a few details which are incorrect because Brady doesn't live in Ireland - a Garda car is an 'Octavia' which has never been used by them in Ireland. Here they mainly use Ford Focus and Maestro cars, occasionally others for undercover such as Audi.

The main detective is Matt Minogue, who seems fairly useless and out of place in the modern era, making no effort to get to grips, shunted off to International liaison in HQ and dealing with a sad case of a dead Polish man. His younger colleague Malone, doing much more serious work, is the only one with a clue.
A large portion of the book is the interspersed tale of a man called Fanning who wants to make a TV drama about a crime underclass. He doesn't even have a script. In his quest for reality the man pays weird people to take him to a vicious dog fight with betting, a gunrunning deal and other unpleasant places where nobody sane should be. This idiot is neglecting his own family and toadying up to anyone who might finance his ideas. Inevitably he gets in to situations he can't handle and is used by the criminals. But we saw that coming from the start, we never liked him and we have no sympathy, and why have we had to spend hours reading about this idiot and the worst people in the world?
At the very end we get a nasty crime scene for Malone and Minogue to walk into and if the editor had done any work we'd have got there a lot sooner.

I have been a huge fan of Brady and I very much encourage readers to start with Kaddish in Dublin and A Stone of The Heart, moving on to The Good Life. Those are well written literary crime stories worth reading. Brady is an Irish man living in Canada.
1.0 out of 5 stars I couldn't finish it! Jan. 19 2013
By Robert M. Ferguson - Published on Amazon.com
Format:Kindle Edition|Verified Purchase
I thoroughly enjoyed all the previous books in this series except Islandbridge (rated it only 2 stars). This one was even worse. I put it aside twice and finally at the 33% mark I just gave up on it. Plodding, dull, uninteresting. Not sure if it's even worth reading the Coast Road. (Wish I had only bought them one at time instead buying all three ( based upon my enjoyment of the preceding books). I'll certainly not buy any further books by John Brady.
3.0 out of 5 stars Too Much Realism? Aug. 19 2011
By Debra Purdy Kong - Published on Amazon.com
Format:Paperback
When a Polish immigrant is found beaten to death on the streets of Dublin, officer Matt Minogue is asked to investigate. Meanwhile, aspiring screen writer, Dermot Fanning, is busily researching Dublin's crime scene. Fanning wants realism in his work, and gets more than he bargained for by witnessing a barbaric dog fight (this will be hard for animal lovers to read), among other things.

I have mixed feelings about this book. Details about the grittier aspects of Dublin are terrific, Minogue's character is well drawn, and the author nicely balances the personal lives of characters with the main plot. The problem was that Fanning's lack of common sense is so annoying that I found myself speed reading through his chapters, hoping to return to Minogue's story. Minogue's investigation became disappointing as well. Too many pages are spent interviewing surly, uncooperative teens who might, or might not, know how the victim died. These scenes slow the pace and, at times, actually diminish the tension with repetitious dialogue. Happily, the action picks up again near the end but, as in real police investigations, it seems to take a long time to get results in this 360 page novel.

Debra
4.0 out of 5 stars so glad that Matt Minogue is back! John Brady fans will rejoice! March 15 2011
By santera - Published on Amazon.com
Format:Paperback|Verified Purchase
so glad that Matt Minogue is back! John Brady fans will rejoice! Subject matter involving a dog fight with backers to the death hard to read. I'd so much rather read about humans getting killed! ;)
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