Good Meat and over one million other books are available for Amazon Kindle. Learn more

Vous voulez voir cette page en français ? Cliquez ici.


or
Sign in to turn on 1-Click ordering.
or
Amazon Prime Free Trial required. Sign up when you check out. Learn More
More Buying Choices
Have one to sell? Sell yours here
Start reading Good Meat on your Kindle in under a minute.

Don't have a Kindle? Get your Kindle here, or download a FREE Kindle Reading App.

Good Meat: The Complete Guide to Sourcing and Cooking Sustainable Meat [Hardcover]

Deborah Krasner , Marcus Nilsson
4.5 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (2 customer reviews)
List Price: CDN$ 48.00
Price: CDN$ 30.10 & FREE Shipping. Details
You Save: CDN$ 17.90 (37%)
o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o
Only 2 left in stock (more on the way).
Ships from and sold by Amazon.ca. Gift-wrap available.
Want it delivered Thursday, October 23? Choose One-Day Shipping at checkout.

Formats

Amazon Price New from Used from
Kindle Edition CDN $25.64  
Hardcover CDN $30.10  
Join Amazon Student in Canada


Book Description

Sept. 1 2010

Good Meat is a comprehensive guide to sourcing and enjoying sustainable meat. With the rising popularity of the locavore and organic food movements—and the terms “grass fed” and “free range” commonly seen on menus and in grocery stores—people across the country are turning their attention to where their meat comes from. Whether for environmental reasons, health benefits, or the astounding difference in taste, consumers want to know that their meat was raised well.

 

With more than 200 recipes for pork, beef, lamb, poultry, and game, stunning photos of delicious dishes, and tips on raising sustainable meat and buying from local farmers, Good Meat is sure to become the classic cooking resource of the sustainable meat movement. 

Praise for Good Meat:

"Good Meat: The Complete Guide to Sourcing and Cooking Sustainable Meat belongs on the shelf of every carnivore out there. If you eat meat and if you raise animals for meat or if you have ever considered eating meat or eggs, you need a copy of Deborah Krasner's work of art. The thoughtful essays, equipment and seasonings chapters alone are worth the price of admission, but the anatomy lessons, cutting instructions and more than 200 recipes make the book a rare bargain indeed."
 -Grit.com

“Deborah Krasner is part of a revolution in food, in agriculture, in nutrition, that is taking place in our nation. Her book is a fine contribution to that revolution, teaching us how to eat more healthfully, how to buy from local farmers, how to cook what they raise.” —Senator Bernie Sanders, from the foreword

“The healing local food movement's success hinges on artisanal farming and domestic culinary arts. Good Meat takes the mystery out of both in a masterful way, bringing all of us another giant step closer to healing the planet one bite at a time. Beautiful pictures and delightful explanations . . . Everyone interested in local, earth-friendly food will love this book." —Joel Salatin, owner of Polyface Farm

"Good Meat is a template for all future cookbooks: one that educates on the culinary differences between factory-farmed meats and animals raised on family farms, and the utilization of the entire animal in a sustainable manner." —Patrick Martins, founder of Slow Food USA, Heritage Foods USA 

"Good Meat is the cookbook for all who have made the choice to eschew factory-farmed meat for grass-fed and pasture-raised meat. This book provides the knowledge to make sustainably raised meat a reality at your table." —Bruce Aidells, author of The Complete Meat Cookbook 

"If you want to cook delicious meals from humanely raised meat, Good Meat is for you. It offers superb recipes designed for grass-fed meat, and provides cooks with the first useful guide to ordering direct from the farm. This book makes you feel good about the meat you eat." —Paula Wolfert, author of Clay Pot Cooking

Frequently Bought Together

Good Meat: The Complete Guide to Sourcing and Cooking Sustainable Meat + The Grassfed Gourmet Cookbook: Healthy Cooking and Good Living with Pasture-Raised Foods
Price For Both: CDN$ 46.72


Customers Who Bought This Item Also Bought


Product Details


Product Description

About the Author

Deborah Krasner is a writer and food professional living in Vermont. She hosts culinary vacations in Italy and Vermont, which have been featured in GQ, Bon Appétit, and the Boston Globe. Krasner won a James Beard Award in 2003 for her cookbook The Flavors of Olive Oil. She appears regularly on NPR’s The Splendid Table and contributes to Bon Appétit and Real Simple, among other publications.


Customer Reviews

3 star
0
2 star
0
1 star
0
4.5 out of 5 stars
4.5 out of 5 stars
Most helpful customer reviews
1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Very big book! Feb. 6 2012
By Jodi-Hummingbird TOP 100 REVIEWER
Format:Hardcover
The book has more than 200 recipes for pork, beef, lamb, poultry, and game. The book is almost all recipes. Readers should know however that most of these recipes are far more in the theme of gourmet eating rather than a strictly-health-based Paleo approach. (Many recipes have grains and things like white pasta in.) Lots of the recipes looked very tasty though.

For those that are interested in sustainable meat for environmental reasons or because it tastes better, this book is a good choice.

For those that are interested in those things but are also very driven by health, and using diet to treat disease, and have chosen to eat a Paleo diet, then a better choice would probably be the excellent Primal Blueprint Quick and Easy Meals: Delicious, Primal-approved meals you can make in under 30 minutes (Primal Blueprint Series) by Mark Sisson.

All the best health books such as Eat Fat, Lose Fat: The Healthy Alternative to Trans Fats, Primal Body, Primal Mind: Beyond the Paleo Diet for Total Health and a Longer Life, The Primal Blueprint: Reprogram your genes for effortless weight loss, vibrant health, and boundless energy (Primal Blueprint Series) and Minding My Mitochondria 2nd Edition: How I overcame secondary progressive multiple sclerosis (MS) and got out of my wheelchair. all recommend buying non-factory-farmed meat (and organ meats) as an essential part of healthy eating.

Meat from animals that aren't fed corn or other unnatural foods really does taste better than factory-farmed meats. This isn't a subtle difference either, it is really noticeable - especially with steaks I find. Grain fed cows are ill cows too as this is an annatural diet for them and it isn't something you want your food budget dollars to support.
Read more ›
Was this review helpful to you?
5.0 out of 5 stars awesome March 28 2011
Format:Hardcover
I have tried at least 10 recipes so far and they are fantastic
i'm now cooking with love
I used to think cooking with great ingredients was enough
I now know better
Was this review helpful to you?
Most Helpful Customer Reviews on Amazon.com (beta)
Amazon.com: 4.6 out of 5 stars  26 reviews
44 of 44 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Delicious Meat! Sept. 29 2010
By cookbookworm - Published on Amazon.com
Format:Hardcover|Verified Purchase
When my roommate decided to buy a side of grass-fed beef from a co-worker 10 years ago, she came home with a single sheet of paper in her hand.
"What is it?" I asked, holding the sparsely typed page gingerly, noting where we were to indicate our preference for steaks or roasts or ground beef.
"The farmer says it's a cut sheet." she shrugged, "I guess we fill it out." She pulled down the old Joy of Cooking from above the fridge, saying, "This book has some diagrams in it, maybe it will help."
We struggled with the cut sheet for a few hours before coming to any decisions. We also bought a second-hand freezer as well, because we thought it might be a good idea to have some extra room for all of that beef. It was a very good idea. We didn't know what we were doing, but after tasting the quality of the grass-fed meat, we were hooked.
Ten years of buying sides and shares of beef and lamb, CSA shares of pork and whole chickens, turkeys, geese and ducks have passed since then. I'm married now, with a growing family to feed, a second freezer and yet I still struggle with filling out a cut sheet.
Thrilled I am, indeed, to find Deborah Krasner's recent book, "Good Meat: The Complete Guide to Sourcing and Cooking Sustainable Meat". In this book, what was perennially intimidating has been laid out for me, in one book, clearly and with lots of diagrams - just the way I like it.
Ms. Krasner has organized her book into sections dealing with each animal, how to source them, what cuts come from which primal, how to ask for what you want, and how to cook the cuts you get to the best advantage. Diagrams, color photos and clear instructions lead each chapter, even before the recipes begin.
The recipes I tried were delicious. My husband said of the Sirloin Steak with Red Wine, "This tastes like something you'd get in a restaurant!" What home cook doesn't secretly want to hear that! For lamb, I loved the Merguez Sausages, saving half the recipe for the freezer to put into a cassoulet later. Black Bean Soup with Smoked Hocks and Sherry introduced me to this wonderful cut. As a result, I'll always have some on hand in my freezer.
From the Poultry section, our favorite has become the Roasted Cardamom, Oregano and Garlic Chicken Thighs. So aromatic, I think there is nothing more lovely than the smell of this chicken floating through the house.
For those who do not eat meat, Ms. Krasner has also included a large section on eggs and other side dishes, among which the Vermont Cheddar Souffle and the Clementine, Fennel and Olive Salad are standouts.
Even beyond the increasingly important issues of grass-fed vs. commercial meat: nutritional, environmental, good animal-husbandry, etc., the book reminds those among us who eat meat to look with honesty and clarity at where our meat comes from. She gives us the tools to access this world without too much stress. I know this for sure, thanks to "Good Meat", I'll never be anxious about filling out a cut sheet again.
16 of 16 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars 5 lbs of amazing information March 9 2011
By Danna Seevers - Published on Amazon.com
Format:Hardcover|Verified Purchase
Whether you're already consuming sustainable meats like grass-fed beef, or you're heading in that direction, it's important to understand that meat raised on grass cannot always be prepared in the same way as conventional meat. Grass-fed beef is much leaner so there is little to insulate it from the heat source, making it important to cook with lower temperatures. Also because of the lack of insulation, the meat will cook about 30-50% faster! I'm embarrassed to admit how many grass-fed roasts and steaks I've ruined because I didn't know how to properly cook them!

As someone who knew very little about cooking until 10 years ago, I tend to depend a lot on cookbooks (truth be told, I'm a "cookbook junkie") for guidance and instruction. That's why I am so thrilled about a new cookbook designed specifically for sustainably raised meats. This is not just a 400 page cook book with over 200 recipes (weighing in at 5 pounds)! It's a complete educational resource. My favorite part is the section on "Cow Anatomy" where she breaks down where each cut of meat comes from and how to communicate a cutting order to the butcher. When I first started buying meat directly from the farmer, nothing was more intimidating than getting that call to say "Your beef is ready, time to get your cutting order to the butcher!" Yikes! I had no clue what was I doing.

Krasner's cookbook not only does this for beef, but offers the same great information on lamb, pork, rabbit and poultry! If you're like I was and the only thing stopping you from buying a whole side of beef, pork or lamb is not understanding how to find it and order it, this is for you. The book is packed with beautiful full-color photographs, thorough explanations of cooking techniques and, for those of you blessed with a little acreage, she even discusses the economics of raising meat in your own backyard.
23 of 25 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Good Meat for Great Cooking! Aug. 22 2010
By Deborah A. Vargo - Published on Amazon.com
Format:Hardcover|Verified Purchase
Full disclosure: I know Deborah from having spent one amazing Autumn week at her cooking school in Vermont. From the terrific food we made then, I knew this book would be amazing. It is. The Salt-Seared Burger with Red Wine Reduction Sauce provides a new way to really amplify burgers. Pig Candy has become a family and friend favorite, creating a smile before even tasting! Deborah's thoughtful writing brings you very close to the animal -- from living being to the meal on your plate. I am delighted to see a huge range of recipes, from beef to lamb, rabbit, pig and poultry. The two that are tempting me next are: Marinated Lamb Shanks with Pomegranate Molasses, Tomatoes and Fresh Mint and Char Siu Bao, tiny pork stuffed buns. That picture alone just make my mouth water! Also included are many recipes for homemade spice blends. We used some of these at the school and we smelled all of them while perusing the spice drawer at Deborah's!
13 of 14 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Very big book! Jan. 31 2012
By Jodi-Hummingbird - Published on Amazon.com
Format:Hardcover
The book has more than 200 recipes for pork, beef, lamb, poultry, and game. The book is almost all recipes. Readers should know however that most of these recipes are far more in the theme of gourmet eating rather than a strictly-health-based Paleo approach. (Many recipes have grains and things like white pasta in.) Lots of the recipes looked very tasty though.

For those that are interested in sustainable meat for environmental reasons or because it tastes better, this book is a good choice.

For those that are interested in those things but are also very driven by health, and using diet to treat disease, and have chosen to eat a Paleo diet, then a better choice would probably be the excellent Primal Blueprint Quick and Easy Meals: Delicious, Primal-approved meals you can make in under 30 minutes (Primal Blueprint Series) by Mark Sisson.

All the best health books such as Eat Fat, Lose Fat: The Healthy Alternative to Trans Fats, Primal Body, Primal Mind: Beyond the Paleo Diet for Total Health and a Longer Life, The Primal Blueprint: Reprogram your genes for effortless weight loss, vibrant health, and boundless energy (Primal Blueprint Series) and Minding My Mitochondria 2nd Edition: How I overcame secondary progressive multiple sclerosis (MS) and got out of my wheelchair. all recommend buying non-factory-farmed meat (and organ meats) as an essential part of healthy eating.

Meat from animals that aren't fed corn or other unnatural foods really does taste better than factory-farmed meats. This isn't a subtle difference either, it is really noticeable - especially with steaks I find. Grain fed cows are ill cows too as this is an annatural diet for them and it isn't something you want your food budget dollars to support.

This book is huge and very, very heavy. It is a lovely book if you like lots of big beautiful images printed on good quality paper, and who doesn't, but it is an almost impossible to read book if you need to read it lying down!

I had the choice of either crushing my chest or really hurting my arms and either way being able to do that for only a few minutes at a time. I realise this is a very uncommon problem though, so I felt it would be stupid to take any stars off for this at all. But for me it meant I had to take in as much of the book as I could as quickly as I could, and it ended up going back to the library pretty quickly, unfortunately.

Overall this is a beautiful and probably very useful book for the gourmet omnivore. The message that factory-farmed meats are no good for us is very hard to argue with.

Jodi Bassett, The Hummingbirds' Foundation for Myalgic Encephalomyelitis
13 of 14 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars a gorgeous book full of information and good recipes Oct. 9 2010
By Valerie Wright - Published on Amazon.com
Format:Hardcover
I agree with another reviewer that this book is tremendously helpful to people who buy animals whole or in shares. The explanations of the choices of cuts available for each animal are invaluable in filling out cut sheets. The book is just as useful for those who buy their grass-fed meat by the piece and want to understand better how to choose and prepare different cuts. While the book includes recipes for the unusual cuts you get when buying a whole animal, there are many more recipes for the cuts you are most likely to find and purchase individually.
I know Deborah Krasner and was a recipe tester for this book, so I have already had a chance to make many of the recipes. I have been most impressed by the variety of recipes and the thought that went into writing them. Krasner's love for the food of the Mediterranean shines in recipes like Sicilian Chicken Thigh Stew with Capers, Middle Eastern Lamb Meatballs with Cinnamon and Cherries, and Rabbit and Prunes Marinated in Red Wine. But Asian influences abound - one of my favorite recipes is Ants Climbing Trees, a Szechuan noodle dish that has entered my regular dinner rotation. Krasner's location in Vermont is unmistakably present in recipes such as New England-Style Slow Pork Butt Roast, and in the beautiful photographs of happy farm animals at home in lush Vermont pastures. This is my favorite kind of cookbook - highly informative, full of recipes I want to make, and written by someone with a passion for good food. I'm sure that I will enjoy reading it and cooking from it for years to come.
Search Customer Reviews
Only search this product's reviews

Look for similar items by category


Feedback