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Good Omens: The Nice and Accurate Prophecies of Agnes Nutter, Witch [Mass Market Paperback]

Neil Gaiman , Terry Pratchett
4.6 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (342 customer reviews)
Price: CDN$ 8.77 & FREE Shipping on orders over CDN$ 25. Details
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Book Description

Nov. 28 2006

According to The Nice and Accurate Prophecies of Agnes Nutter, Witch (the world's only completely accurate book of prophecies, written in 1655, before she exploded), the world will end on a Saturday. Next Saturday, in fact. Just before dinner.

So the armies of Good and Evil are amassing, Atlantis is rising, frogs are falling, tempers are flaring. Everything appears to be going according to Divine Plan. Except a somewhat fussy angel and a fast-living demon—both of whom have lived amongst Earth's mortals since The Beginning and have grown rather fond of the lifestyle—are not actually looking forward to the coming Rapture.

And someone seems to have misplaced the Antichrist . . .


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Good Omens: The Nice and Accurate Prophecies of Agnes Nutter, Witch + American Gods + Neverwhere: A Novel
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Product Description

From Amazon

Pratchett (of Discworld fame) and Gaiman (of Sandman fame) may seem an unlikely combination, but the topic (Armageddon) of this fast-paced novel is old hat to both. Pratchett's wackiness collaborates with Gaiman's morbid humor; the result is a humanist delight to be savored and reread again and again. You see, there was a bit of a mixup when the Antichrist was born, due in part to the machinations of Crowley, who did not so much fall as saunter downwards, and in part to the mysterious ways as manifested in the form of a part-time rare book dealer, an angel named Aziraphale. Like top agents everywhere, they've long had more in common with each other than the sides they represent, or the conflict they are nominally engaged in. The only person who knows how it will all end is Agnes Nutter, a witch whose prophecies all come true, if one can only manage to decipher them. The minor characters along the way (Famine makes an appearance as diet crazes, no-calorie food and anorexia epidemics) are as much fun as the story as a whole, which adds up to one of those rare books which is enormous fun to read the first time, and the second time, and the third time... --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

From Publishers Weekly

When a scatterbrained Satanist nun goofs up a baby-switching scheme and delivers the infant Antichrist to the wrong couple, it's just the beginning of the comic errors in the divine plan for Armageddon which this fast-paced novel by two British writers zanily details. Aziraphale, an angel who doubles as a rare-book dealer, and Crowley, a demon friend who's assigned to the same territory, like life on Earth too much to allow the long-planned war between Heaven and Hell to happen. They set out to find the Antichrist and avert Armageddon, on the way encountering the last living descendant of Agnes Nutter, Anathema, who's been deciphering accurate prophecies of the world's doom but is unaware she's living in the same town as the Antichrist, now a thoroughly human and normal 11-year-old named Adam. As the appointed day and hour approach, Aziraphale and Crowley blunder through seas of fire and rains of fish, and come across a misguided witch hunter, a middle-aged fortune teller and the Four Horsepersons of the Apocalypse. It's up to Adam in the neatly tied end, as his humanity prevails over the Divine Plan and earthly bungling. Some humor is strictly British, but most will appeal even to Americans "and other aliens." Literary Guild alternate.
Copyright 1990 Reed Business Information, Inc. --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

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Customer Reviews

Most helpful customer reviews
9 of 9 people found the following review helpful
Format:Mass Market Paperback
Bad news. The Apocalypse is coming. Soon. Luckily, Heaven and Hell have left the business with the Anti-Christ in the hands of Crowley and Aziraphale, demon and angel respectively. Now they have misplaced the Anti-Christ and pretty much decided they really like humanity a lot more than their either of their bosses.
In the first edition, the full title of this book was "The Nice & Accurate Prophecies of Agnes Nutter, Witch." "Nice," in this context, meaning precisely correct. Agnes saw it all coming, from her being burned alive as a witch to the air force base where Armageddon will begin ("Peas is our professiune."). Agnes, her descendant, Anathema, the Four Horseman - Horsepersons - and the Other Four Horseman (a different chapter of Hell's Angels); it all comes together with the serried ranks of angels and demons gathered overhead.
Yes, this is an hysterically funny book. A satire and a parody, it lampoons everything in sight. From Elvis sightings to televangelists to the destruction of all intelligent life ("nothing left but dust and fundamentalists."), little escapes the scathing wit of Gaiman and Pratchett.
Of course the demon, Crowley, drives a 1926 Bentley. Of course any tape left in its glove box for more than two weeks turns into something by Queen. Of course the flaming sword used by War is delivered to her by International Express.
And what happens to the telephone solicitor, Lisa Morrow? Come on now, you secretly thought all telephone solicitors deserved it, right?
In the tradition of Jonathan Swift and Mark Twain, the satire makes a point. That point may be unpalatable to the religiously inflexible, or to those whose sense of righteousness hampers their sense of humor.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars If you like British humor... July 19 2004
Format:Mass Market Paperback
Think Monty Python meets Douglas Adams' Hitchiker's Guide. Throw in a bit of Dogma (the Kevin Smith film), and you have this book. If you like all three of these, you'll probably enjoy Good Omens. It helps to have a basic understanding of Biblical prophecy and a bit of appreciation for British humor. Without these, you might get a bit lost.
The only thing I didn't like about this book is that I had a hard time figuring out where it was going a lot of the time. It felt like there were a lot of unnecessary scenes. I kept waiting and waiting for the Apocalypse to come around, but it seemed to take forever.
Still, it was worth reading. I laughed outloud at several of the jokes, and the two main characters--the representitves from heaven and hell pictured on the cover were hysterical. It's worth the seven dollars just for them.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Very droll Sept. 14 2006
By Krypter
Format:Paperback
Good Omens is a novel of wit and humour that takes the Revelations chapter of the Bible and uses it to poke fun at human foibles and pretensions. A heartwarming story at its core, it delivers a non-stop barrage of dry British humour that will have fans of Douglas Adams rolling on the floor. Requires some, but not a lot of, familiarity with British culture and regions. While its eschatological delving may not be profound, it delivers a steady stream of fun, satire and well-deserved ribbing of modern society. I'll never listen to Freddie Mercury in the same way again.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Apocalypse WOW! June 18 2003
Format:Mass Market Paperback
Terry Pratchett has long been known (and admired) for his considerable ability to make anyone and anything a satirical target. He has taken on the police force, Death, and every conceivable political institution know to man. The Powers That Be, of course, are the only target left. And boy were they hit hard.
Teamed with the uber-talented Neil Gaiman, Pratchett has taken the wit and wisdom of his famed Discworld series and applied it to the end of the world. The result is one of the most brilliant books you will ever read.
The story of Good Omens follows a variety of characters, the principles being Crowley (a demon who has "gone native"), Aziraphale (an angel who has pretty much "gone native" as well), and Adam, the Antichrist, who was mistakenly switched at birth and has grownup away from the influence of Good and Evil. The Apocalypse has been right on schedule, until Hell realizes that the aforementioned Antichrist is not where he is supposed to be, and Crowley, now the focus of a great deal of blame, must find him. Of course, Pratchett's trademark humor is found throughout the book. The demons and angels have decidedly human qualities (Crowley attempts to enrage humanity into sinning by jamming all cell phones in London for example), which not only exposes our own flaws in a humorous way, but also adds to the appeal of the characters. Everything from poorly-made foreign cars, to bikers, to the entirety of Manchester has been lampooned with satirical perfection and when you aren't laughing at the subtle humor, you are marveling at how well the plot flows and the sheer variety of characters portrayed. Fair warning - if Douglas Adams and Monty Python have never been appealing to you, you will probably not "get" this book. For those of you who are so enlightened, however, this comes with my highest possible recommendation.
Was this review helpful to you?
1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Apocalypse WOW! June 18 2003
Format:Mass Market Paperback
Terry Pratchett has long been known (and admired) for his considerable ability to make anyone and anything a satirical target. He has taken on the police force, Death, and every conceivable political institution know to man. The Powers That Be, of course, are the only target left. And boy were they hit hard.
Teamed with the uber-talented Neil Gaiman, Pratchett has taken the wit and wisdom of his famed Discworld series and applied it to the end of the world. The result is one of the most brilliant books you will ever read.
The story of Good Omens follows a variety of characters, the principles being Crowley (a demon who has "gone native"), Aziraphale (an angel who has pretty much "gone native" as well), and Adam, the Antichrist, who was mistakenly switched at birth and has grownup away from the influence of Good and Evil. The Apocalypse has been right on schedule, until Hell realizes that the aforementioned Antichrist is not where he is supposed to be, and Crowley, now the focus of a great deal of blame, must find him. Of course, Pratchett's trademark humor is found throughout the book. The demons and angels have decidedly human qualities (Crowley attempts to enrage humanity into sinning by jamming all cell phones in London for example), which not only exposes our own flaws in a humorous way, but also adds to the appeal of the characters. Everything from poorly-made foreign cars, to bikers, to the entirety of Manchester has been lampooned with satirical perfection and when you aren't laughing at the subtle humor, you are marveling at how well the plot flows and the sheer variety of characters portrayed. Fair warning - if Douglas Adams and Monty Python have never been appealing to you, you will probably not "get" this book. For those of you who are so enlightened, however, this comes with my highest possible recommendation.
Was this review helpful to you?
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Most recent customer reviews
2.0 out of 5 stars Too many cooks/writers spoil the broth/novel............
While both authors are deservedly recognized as being the tops in their field, this 'combined writing adventure' leaves a great deal to be desired. Read more
Published 2 months ago by Ronald W. Maron
4.0 out of 5 stars Good Omens a bit of an end-of-the-world (not) romp through the English...
If you've ever read anything by Neil Gaimen, you don't need me to explain that this book is different in the way all of his writing is different. Read more
Published 11 months ago by Gina
4.0 out of 5 stars Superb!!
Great book to initiate readers to the wonderful world of Neil Gaiman...Could not put it down once I started. Already on my 3rd book by the author!!
Published 13 months ago by ashish
5.0 out of 5 stars Very Monty Pythonish
British humour at it's best. Even better it's launched me into Terry Pratchett's other work so thanks on multiple accounts there.
Published 14 months ago by Dan
5.0 out of 5 stars Good Omens
Good from start to finish, I love nearly all the characters, a definite page turner. This is my third copy.
Published on July 5 2012 by Cynrig
5.0 out of 5 stars Original
One of his best books. Gaiman really knows how to grab our attention. And the dialogs are really interesting.
Published on June 17 2010 by Luis Patricio
1.0 out of 5 stars Rip Off
While this book is, undoubtedly fantastic, and I have owned my ragged, dog-eared paperback copy for years, and love and own (legally) every copy of Mr. Read more
Published on Jan. 2 2010 by m hobcraft
1.0 out of 5 stars D+ for "Good Omens"
D+ for "Good Omens" by Neil Gaiman and Terry Pratchett

I started reading it, then I started enjoying it, and then stuff happened, the story jumped around, and then more... Read more
Published on Sept. 21 2009 by Zafri M.
5.0 out of 5 stars My lord, I love this book
Even when you're dealing with two of your favourite authors - as I am in this case - you can't be sure that their styles will gel. Read more
Published on Jan. 31 2009 by Jack Blatant
5.0 out of 5 stars Brilliant and Hysterical
While this novel is much darker than some of Terry Pratchett's other works it is still side splittingly hilarious. A must read in my own humble opinion. Read more
Published on Feb. 1 2008 by J. Collyer
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