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Graphic Guide to Frame Construction [Paperback]

Rob Thallon
4.8 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (18 customer reviews)

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Book Description

Jan. 1 2009 For Pros By Pros
The classic guide - revised and updated. The book that builders, architects, and students have relied on for almost 20 years has been completely updated to cover new materials, construction methods, and the latest building code revisions. The standard reference in its field, Rob Thallons Graphic Guide to Frame Construction is the ultimate visual guide to building with wood. Filled with hundreds of detailed drawings, helpful annotations, and field-tested advice, the guide covers foundations, floors, walls, roofs, and stairs. This third revised edition also offers additional information on advanced framing, engineered and composite materials, and construction in high-wind and seismic areas.

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From Library Journal

For over 100 years, the majority of North American homes have been built using wooden framing. This technique is strong, conserves materials, and allows great design flexibility. Framing Basics (part of Sterling's excellent "Basics" series, which covers numerous tools and woodworking techniques) offers a helpful introduction to framing for do-it-yourselfers. Readers for whom this book is intended aren't going to build an entire house; they are homeowners who want to move, remove, or install a wall or create built-in storage. Peters covers tool-use, materials, methods of work, and demolition in easily understood text supplemented with numerous color photographs. Thallon, a professor of architecture, takes frame construction to the next level, showing how to build a house's entire shell from the foundation to the roof. He believes that when properly constructed, a wood-framed house should be able to last for 200 years or more. This title's intended audience is professional builders and designers; a great deal of reader knowledge is assumed by the author. Broad sections include foundations, floors, walls, roofs, and stairs. The text is brief and to the point, with a huge number of excellent illustrations providing the details. Libraries that own the original edition (1991) of this title should consider this revisionDit covers recent developments such as new sheathing methods, wood I-joists, and vinyl windows. A comprehensive glossary and list of resources round out this title. Structural insulated panels (SIPs) consist of slabs of foam insulation sandwiched between oriented strand board or plywood. They represent one of the newest technologies and may render wood-framing methods obsolete. Morley, a builder who specializes in SIPs construction, gives a compelling argument for this new systemDit's structurally superior, better insulated, faster to erect, and more environmentally friendly than traditional methods. The use of SIPs requires many specialized tools and techniques, all of which are covered in detail. A large resource list provides the names of architects, builders, and companies that deal with this system. Framing Basics is well written and is geared toward the beginner; with other titles in Sterling's "Basics" series, it deserves a place in most public library collections. Both Thallon's and Morley's works are excellent but are geared toward a specialized audience; public libraries with comprehensive collections and academic library architecture collections should consider them.DJonathan Hershey, Akron-Summit Cty. P.L.
Copyright 2001 Reed Business Information, Inc. --This text refers to the Spiral-bound edition.

Review

"An invaluable reference for experienced designers and builders; an essential aid for beginners." Richard Meyer, National Association of Home Builders" --This text refers to the Spiral-bound edition.

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Front Cover | Copyright | Table of Contents | Excerpt | Index | Back Cover
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Customer Reviews

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Most helpful customer reviews
4 of 4 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A must have May 11 2005
By A Customer
Format:Spiral-bound
For anyone involved or intereted in home frame construction this is the book to have. I am an architectural draftsman and this book, in my opinion, is the best reference book I own. Whatever the construction detail, this book has it. The detailed drawings are clear and well explained. What I really like most is that they give you several details for floors,decks,roofs,etc. depending on the situation. This is very helpful when you deal with custom designed homes when no two are alike.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Best Framing book for Do-It-Yourselfers! Aug. 6 2003
Format:Spiral-bound
I had to replace a small shed roof (15'X4.5') on the back of a sun room and was very disappointed in ALL of the responses I received from the local contractors. Northern Virginia has been a hot spot for home renovations the past 5 years and apparently, these guys simply do not have to try to get work. Their complete lack of professionalism, responsiveness, and outrageous prices convinced me to do the project myself and thankfully, I found this book before I started. It provided clear, concise drawings and pictures that showed me, a beginner, how to frame, flash, and roof my entire project. The room is dry as bone now and I can't tell you how often I hear, "You did that yourself!". Great book.
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Format:Spiral-bound
I am a homeowner and adventurous tinkerer with all things mechancial/technical. I have never swung a hammer for a living, and am fairly clueless when it comes to general construction. (I have installed windows, replaced drywall, repaired plumbing, and run electrical simple lines, never built anything from scratch).
I am about to embark on a complete remodel of a previously converted garage, and wanted to do most of the work myself. Armed with a copy of Visio 2002, I planned the layout of the new room (about 20' x 15') which will include moving some interior walls and doors, blocking an exterior window, installing a new interior window, and extensive removal and replacement of siding, sheathing, drywall, stucco, flooring, etc.
Well, I needed a book that could augment my basic "sense" of the way things should look with some actual technical information. For example, how exactly do you frame an opening for a new window or door? How do you frame up a new wall segment that joins to an existing wall segment? What the heck is a "king stud" any way?
All of this information is laid out very nicely in a textbook-like format, with lots of diagrams. The great thing is the way that the author starts each section with an overview drawing (say of a typical exterior frame of a house), then points to specific features, which are then detailed in subsequent sections.
I would liken this to a "Bentley Manual" for automotive repair; it will not tell the complete novice how to build a wall, but for someone who already knows the difference between a 10d hot-dipped box nail and a 8 x 1-1/4" Drywall screw it is a great reference and can add a LOT of clarity to the way that homes are actually constructed using "best practices".
Read more ›
Was this review helpful to you?
Format:Spiral-bound
I am a homeowner and adventurous tinkerer with all things mechancial/technical. I have never swung a hammer for a living, and am fairly clueless when it comes to general construction. (I have installed windows, replaced drywall, repaired plumbing, and run electrical simple lines, never built anything from scratch).
I am about to embark on a complete remodel of a previously converted garage, and wanted to do most of the work myself. Armed with a copy of Visio 2002, I planned the layout of the new room (about 20' x 15') which will include moving some interior walls and doors, blocking an exterior window, installing a new interior window, and extensive removal and replacement of siding, sheathing, drywall, stucco, flooring, etc.
Well, I needed a book that could augment my basic "sense" of the way things should look with some actual technical information. For example, how exactly do you frame an opening for a new window or door? How do you frame up a new wall segment that joins to an existing wall segment? What the heck is a "king stud" any way?
All of this information is laid out very nicely in a textbook-like format, with lots of diagrams. The great thing is the way that the author starts each section with an overview drawing (say of a typical exterior frame of a house), then points to specific features, which are then detailed in subsequent sections.
I would liken this to a "Bentley Manual" for automotive repair; it will not tell the complete novice how to build a wall, but for someone who already knows the difference between a 10d hot-dipped box nail and a 8 x 1-1/4" Drywall screw it is a great reference and can add a LOT of clarity to the way that homes are actually constructed using "best practices".
Read more ›
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4.0 out of 5 stars Excellent text, awesome drawings Nov. 7 2001
Format:Spiral-bound
"Graphic Guide to Frame Construction" is an excellently illustrated spiral bound 'book' on wood frame construction. It covers all the major elements of home construction, from foundation, to floors, to walls, to roofs. It can be read as a book but is very reference-able. It does however assume some basic understanding of home construction, so it's not an absolute starter book. The text is a bit terse and requires some mulling over, but the drawings are fantastic. If you are considering building an outbuilding, adding on to your home, or perhaps even building your own home, this is one must have book, worth every single penny paid. Did I say that the illustrations are fantastic? They are.
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Most recent customer reviews
5.0 out of 5 stars Five Stars
Like a new
Published 19 days ago by cassandre bouchard
5.0 out of 5 stars Highly recommended as a guide to wood framing
This book was recommended to me by an engineer for drawing architectural plan details for the most up to date information. Read more
Published 18 months ago by Dirk Pitt
5.0 out of 5 stars Great book
For anyone interested in construction this is a great book.
There's a lot of illustration, so this is great for DIY like me
Published 18 months ago by Antoine Martin
5.0 out of 5 stars Fabulous book
I purchased this book for my dad as he was about to embark on a crazy reno project. Since we received it his nose has been firmly planted within the pages, the content is concise... Read more
Published on Nov. 14 2010 by Ben
5.0 out of 5 stars my most-used reference book
I am a residential architect, and I refer to this book constantly when drawing details for a variety of projects. Read more
Published on Dec 3 2003
5.0 out of 5 stars Excellent Reference for Pros and Do it yourselfers!
This book is part of Taunton's "For Pros by Pros" Series. While I (As a building "Pro") would argue that some of the books in this series would not really be... Read more
Published on July 8 2003 by Michael Giacomin
4.0 out of 5 stars not bad
This book is great for learning about general framing. It's a good book to have around. Wish it had more detail (or should I say any at all regarding the subject of roofing and... Read more
Published on April 5 2003 by Mr. Noel K. Selewa
5.0 out of 5 stars Great book!
I bought this book along with an armful of others its type to help me with a remodel. It is by far the best and easiest to understand. Read more
Published on Feb. 10 2003 by "chuck_mead"
5.0 out of 5 stars A wonderful tool for working on your home
This book far exceeded my expectations. The drawings, diagrams, tables and descriptions really helped me finish up the details for designing my own home.
Published on Nov. 11 2002 by Bridger
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