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Green Architecture Paperback – May 1 2000


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Product Details

  • Paperback: 240 pages
  • Publisher: Taschen (May 1 2000)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 3822863033
  • ISBN-13: 978-3822863039
  • Product Dimensions: 20.1 x 2.1 x 25.1 cm
  • Shipping Weight: 962 g
  • Average Customer Review: 3.5 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (2 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: #664,663 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

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L'idée écologique et la protection de l'environnement mèneront-elles au XXIe siècle à une nouvelle architecture ? James Wines, architecte américain et spécialiste d'environmental design, plaide dans ce livre pour une réconciliation de l'architecture et de la nature. Cette question est abordée d'un point de vue plus conceptuel et esthétique que technologique.

Après avoir passé en revue "l'architecture verte" au XXe siècle (Antonio Gaudi, Frank Lloyd Wright...), retracé l'histoire de l'habitat écologique du néolithique à nos jours, James Wines analyse les oeuvres de 38 architectes internationaux des années 90 qui ont participé, chacun à leur façon, à la formation d'une architecture écologique (Emilio Ambasz, Jean Nouvel, Renzo Piano...). Illustré de très nombreuses photographies couleur, ce livre s'adresse autant aux spécialistes d'architecture contemporaine qu'à un plus large public, intéressé par les questions d'environnement. --Franck Mimar --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.


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From an ecological perspective, mainstream architecture for the past two decades has sent out all the wrong messages. Read the first page
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Front Cover | Copyright | Table of Contents | Excerpt | Index | Back Cover
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful By James Ferguson on Sept. 30 2003
Format: Paperback
At first glance this seems like an excellent introduction to green architecture. James Wines has assembled an impressive collection of photographs of some of the eco-architecture that has been built over the past 30 years. But, a closer examination reveals numerous holes in the narrative. Wines has put together a grab bag of ideas that held my attention but left me scratching my head as to why he left so many important architects out of his survey, and included some of rather dubious distinction.
Wines holds Frank Lloyd Wright paramount in his pantheon of ecologically-minded architects, alluding to his concepts of "The Natural House" and "Organic Architecture," as virtually the only texts written on eco-architecture at the height of the Modern movement. Wines likes Wright more for his aesthetic vision of ecologically sensitive architecture than for any great technological innovations in the field of eco-architecture. Wines laments the fact that eco-architecture is driven too much by the latest technology, and not enough by aesthetic concerns.
He brushes over the Modern movement, which did offer a number of technological innovations, such as Buckminister Fuller's Dymaxion House and geodesic dome, and did explore traditional patterns in design, as in the work of Aldo Van Eyck, who was a contributing editor for Shelter. Wines wrote off Le Corbusier, ignoring the architect's later work, which was very site specific.
However, the most glaring omissions are contemporary architects like Ralph Erskine, Glenn Murcutt, Samuel Mockbee, and Ken Yeang who have all given a great deal of consideration to environmentally responsive architecture.
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Format: Paperback
This book questions the way architecture affects the environment, and encourages architects to ask the (W)right questions themselves to help remedy their destructive ways. I am disappointed that certain architects where left out of this book, for example there was one photo of a Malcolm Wells house, but no essay was done on him!? An essay on earthships would have fit into this book nicely also. I could go on, and on about all the Green Architects that where left out, maybe the author will include more with a new version 10 years from now. You need to be careful that you question all that the author tells you. For example the author seems convinced that Christians are bent on destruction because of their belief that the earth was made for them, therefore they have the right to destroy it, but in reality the Christian's point of view is just the opposite in that the earth was made for them so therefore it is their duty to protect it. What's with the photo taken in B.C. Canada, I never knew there where palm trees in Canada!? I bought this book for some of it's photos of unusual looking buildings, but have discovered there is allot more to the book than photo's. Read it, enjoy it, question it, question yourself.
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Most Helpful Customer Reviews on Amazon.com (beta)

Amazon.com: 5 reviews
21 of 21 people found the following review helpful
More holes than in the Ozone layer Sept. 30 2003
By James Ferguson - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Paperback
At first glance this seems like an excellent introduction to green architecture. James Wines has assembled an impressive collection of photographs of some of the eco-architecture that has been built over the past 30 years. But, a closer examination reveals numerous holes in the narrative. Wines has put together a grab bag of ideas that held my attention but left me scratching my head as to why he left so many important architects out of his survey, and included some of rather dubious distinction.
Wines holds Frank Lloyd Wright paramount in his pantheon of ecologically-minded architects, alluding to his concepts of "The Natural House" and "Organic Architecture," as virtually the only texts written on eco-architecture at the height of the Modern movement. Wines likes Wright more for his aesthetic vision of ecologically sensitive architecture than for any great technological innovations in the field of eco-architecture. Wines laments the fact that eco-architecture is driven too much by the latest technology, and not enough by aesthetic concerns.
He brushes over the Modern movement, which did offer a number of technological innovations, such as Buckminister Fuller's Dymaxion House and geodesic dome, and did explore traditional patterns in design, as in the work of Aldo Van Eyck, who was a contributing editor for Shelter. Wines wrote off Le Corbusier, ignoring the architect's later work, which was very site specific.
However, the most glaring omissions are contemporary architects like Ralph Erskine, Glenn Murcutt, Samuel Mockbee, and Ken Yeang who have all given a great deal of consideration to environmentally responsive architecture. You certainly can't call them "eco-freaks," as their work has been readily accepted by the mainstream architectural community.
But, Wines does offer a number of engaging examples from which to draw from, including his own work with SITE. Perhaps the most interesting examples are the "prophetic visions" such as an Ozone-maker by Jeffrey Miles, seemingly inspired by Leonardo da Vinci, and Michael Sorkin's "Shroom," which has a wonderful kinetic quality like that of Kiesler's "Endless House." Great photos and illustrations, but read this book with grain of salt.
10 of 12 people found the following review helpful
On the path to Eden Dec 13 2000
By Alejandro Montero - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Paperback
Our basic way of thinking and living must change in order for the human species to survive and evolve on a sustainable planet. We already possess the knowledge and the technology to rebuild paradise on earth. We now need a growing, global conciousness and the wisdom necessary to move forward.
This book gives an excellent historical and philosophical account on the shifts of human settlements and explains the imperative necessity of a change in attitude towards our built environment and its intrinsic relationship with its natural context.
Many examples and a variety of projects, attitudes, perspectives, and approaches to the environmental problems back Mr. Wines view that there is no alternative, that a green architecture must become a basic constant and not remain a mere superficial trend.
6 of 8 people found the following review helpful
Questions & Direction Jan. 5 2003
By Scott Knudsen - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Paperback
This book questions the way architecture affects the environment, and encourages architects to ask the (W)right questions themselves to help remedy their destructive ways. I am disappointed that certain architects where left out of this book, for example there was one photo of a Malcolm Wells house, but no essay was done on him!? An essay on earthships would have fit into this book nicely also. I could go on, and on about all the Green Architects that where left out, maybe the author will include more with a new version 10 years from now. You need to be careful that you question all that the author tells you. For example the author seems convinced that Christians are bent on destruction because of their belief that the earth was made for them, therefore they have the right to destroy it, but in reality the Christian's point of view is just the opposite in that the earth was made for them so therefore it is their duty to protect it. What's with the photo taken in B.C. Canada, I never knew there where palm trees in Canada!? I bought this book for some of it's photos of unusual looking buildings, but have discovered there is allot more to the book than photo's. Read it, enjoy it, question it, question yourself.
1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
Valuable Jan. 11 2006
By P. SU - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Paperback
Lots of ideas,concepts,inspirations at 1/10 the price. Well worth the money towards architectural environmental consciousness.

However the discussion remains as an introduction without too much depth into project details
Green Architecture Nov. 13 2011
By George Walter Tedder III - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
James Wines book is well written. The photos and drawings lend depth to the topic of Green Architecture. James Wines challenges our concepts of beauty in the build environment and redefines form and function.


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