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Growing Up Digital: The Rise of the Net Generation Hardcover – Oct 1 1997


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Product Details

  • Hardcover: 338 pages
  • Publisher: Mcgraw-Hill (October 1997)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0070633614
  • ISBN-13: 978-0070633612
  • Product Dimensions: 22.6 x 15.2 x 3.2 cm
  • Shipping Weight: 699 g
  • Average Customer Review: 3.9 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (41 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: #1,515,812 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)
  • See Complete Table of Contents


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First Sentence
The Net Generation has arrived! Read the first page
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Front Cover | Copyright | Table of Contents | Excerpt | Index | Back Cover
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Customer Reviews

3.9 out of 5 stars
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By "sabsimon3" on Feb. 16 2004
Format: Paperback
This book will definitely appeal to young people. The author creates the term 'N-Generation' obstensibly because Generation-Y was owned by another author. The book creates a super youth culture that is underappreciated and misunderstood. If you want to write a book that will appeal to young people and get a good rating on the college campus ... just trash the previous generation and the youth will scramble on board the turnip cart. This book does a disservice to youth and to the previous generation by promoting stereotypes, underscoring obscure opinions, and understating the contributions made by the Boomers.
The author should keep in mind that the N-geners didn't create computers and for the most part, they are clueless when it comes to coding. They do not qualify as experts ... not by a long shot. To encourage youth today to believe that they are experts in computers ... and the people who designed them are not ... is setting them up for real disappointment.
The author's opinions on TV and media are also absurd. He creates a model in which the state of everything that is not N-Gen is fixed and unchanging ... while the opposite is true for his heroes. Perhaps the most convincing argument that can be made against this author's opinions is that a good deal of his computer-based examples are already 'off-the-air'. Moreover, his characterization of the pre-web media era as being fearful of the new technology is way off base ... and today's integration of technologies is proof of this.
The book was written to promote sales rather than good, usable, and thoughtful ideas. Young people will adore this author ... not because he makes a good case ... but because he writes what they want to hear ... and makes them feel the way they want to feel ... like heroes.
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Format: Paperback
When I first read it years ago, and rereading it today, I find a lot in this book that is insightful and, moreso, true. The author gives a look into the trends, ways, and lives of the N-Gen that is intriguing. Being one of this generation, it is like looking into my past and recalling my childhood.
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By A Customer on Jan. 2 2003
Format: Paperback
This is absolutely one of the best researched, most interesting, well written, and easy to read books on this topic. A must read for educators of Info-Age youngsters. It will enlighten the pre- Info-Age generations to a whole new world and way of thinking!
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By Kenneth P. Hetrick on March 9 2002
Format: Paperback
Maybe my expectations were too high based on the reviews. I found most of the information in this book to be news items. Also, anyone that follows technology in the news will not find much insight into this book. The book is an overview of how the younger generation uses technology in their social lives, play and work. If you are not very familiar with the internet and don't watch the news this book would be worthwhile. However, anyone who uses the internet and keeps up on the news won't get much out of it.
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Format: Paperback
Tapscott's compelling book provides us with an elucidating glimpse and revelation as to how the Net Generation's facility with the digital media is changing human interactions and impacting our future, with specific reference to education, business, economics, politics, and even parenting. These "bathed in bits" children, those between 2 and 22 in 2000, are characterized as tolerant of diversity, self-confident, curious, assertive, self-reliant, contrarian, flexible, and highly intelligent. These characteristics are a necessary consequence of their generation's exposure to the Net. The Net's structure has allowed for a more fluid interchange of information and interactive type of communication. In cyberspace, there are no hierarchies and the readily available access to information has created in its young netizens the quest to search for and be critical of information. This new information model is a digression and radical shift from the industrial, broadcast model that is top-down, linear, centralized, and passive. The new model is the antithesis of this broadcast model because it is interactive, distributed, and malleable.
"For the first time in history youth are an authority on an innovation central to society's development" (Preface, ix). Our children know a lot more than we do in terms of technology. According to Tapscott, this situation has created not just a generation gap, but a generation lap, akin to race track leads measured in terms of gaps that consequently metaphorically heightens the stark contrast of technological knowledge between children and parents. Because these children are born with technology, they assimilate them, rather than accommodate them, which is what adults do to cope with technological advances that often produces cognitive friction for them.
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Format: Paperback
Growing Up Digital: The Rise of the Net Generation. Don Tapscott 1998.
Tapscott acknowledges and celebrates that "The Children of a Digital Age" are reconfiguring our work environments, relationships, educational systems and learning modes, concepts of citizenship and democracy, and our present and future.
Tapscott, author of "Digital Economy" and others, President of New Paradigm Learning Corporation and chairman of a think tank funded by leading technology and government organizations, offers an insiders view of the "Net Generation".
The "N-Geners" are over 88 million strong and represent the largest demographic group in the United States and Canada. They are the pioneering generation growing up immersed in the ubiquitous new digital media - computers, the Internet, CD-ROMs, video games and more. Forget a childhood of imaginary playmates - "Net Geners" now use their imaginations and technology skills to communicate across the Web, ignoring limitations of location and time via digital media. Major themes explored in "Growing Up Digital" include social transformation, democracy and citizenship, the nature of education, learning, business, communication and interactivity in the digital media era.
Tapscott approaches this post "Smells like Teen Spirit" Nirvana-generation with sheer fascination and importantly, respect. Tapscott's strength is his willingness to listen. As a young "N-Gener" interviewee points out, she feels that adults take her opinion more seriously because she may know more about technology than they do. The Net interview discussions with 300 youth between the age of four and twenty, led by a research team leader all of 24 years old, produced fascinating insights into our future - who we are and who will be as students, teachers, workers, citizens, consumers.
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