CDN$ 35.78 + CDN$ 3.49 shipping
In Stock. Sold by importcds__
Quantity:1

Compare Offers on Amazon
Add to Cart
CDN$ 37.88
+ CDN$ 3.49 shipping
Sold by: moviemars-canada
Add to Cart
CDN$ 37.89
+ CDN$ 3.49 shipping
Sold by: Rarewaves-US
Add to Cart
CDN$ 39.56
+ CDN$ 3.49 shipping
Sold by: marvelio-ca
Have one to sell? Sell on Amazon

Image Unavailable

Image not available for
Colour:
  • HOUSE OF WAX 3D
  • Sorry, this item is not available in
      

HOUSE OF WAX 3D


List Price: CDN$ 45.97
Price: CDN$ 35.78
You Save: CDN$ 10.19 (22%)
In Stock.
Ships from and sold by importcds__.
14 new from CDN$ 35.78 3 used from CDN$ 50.36

Today Only: "Psych: The Complete Series" for $69.99
For one day only: Psych: The Complete Series is at a one day special price. Offer valid on April 27, 2015, applies only to purchases of products sold by Amazon.ca, and does not apply to products sold by third-party merchants and other sellers through the Amazon.ca site. Learn more
CDN$ 35.78 In Stock. Ships from and sold by importcds__.


Frequently Bought Together

HOUSE OF WAX 3D + Dial M for Murder 3D - Le crime était presque parfait [Blu-ray 3D + Blu-ray] (Bilingual)
Price For Both: CDN$ 79.77

These items are shipped from and sold by different sellers.

Buy the selected items together

Product Details

  • Format: Blu-ray
  • Language: English
  • Region: All Regions
  • Aspect Ratio: 1.77:1
  • Number of discs: 1
  • MPAA Rating: UNRATED
  • Average Customer Review: 4.1 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (41 customer reviews)
  • ASIN: B00DQLQN3S
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: #108,104 in DVD (See Top 100 in DVD)

Product Description

In the wicked performance that crowned him the movie's master of the macabre, Vincent Price plays a renowned wax sculptor plunged into madness when an arsonist destroys his life's work. Unable to use his flame-scarred hands, he devises a new - and murderous - way of restocking his House of Wax.

Customer Reviews

4.1 out of 5 stars

Most helpful customer reviews

1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Ed Mich on June 22 2004
Format: DVD
I mananged to see a version of "House of Wax" on Turner Classic Movies and I thought that it was a great horror movie. Not being a big fan of horror films, I can't compare to other ones of that time, but this one was great. It stars horror movie legend Vincent Price and a young Charles Bronson who is credited as Charles Buchinsky. Having been to wax museums in the past, I can relate to the fact that after seeing the was figures for so long, you could begin to believe that all of the people around you who are not moving are actually made of wax, something that was briefly mentioned in the movie. A big problem with the movie was that it was made in 3D during its first release. This could create a problem for the present viewings because some things are pointless. They made things for the movie just so people can see the 3D effect. For example, a three minute sequence of women dancing, throwing their legs in the air. When it was made, it was cool seeing the legs come out of the screen, but while I was watching it, it was pretty much pointless.
The movie begins with Vincent Price as Professor Henry Jarrod. He takes pride in his wax figures which he often refers to as his friends. They speak to him, and he understands them well, and how they want to be made. In a way to make more money, an investor burns up the museum and flees the sight leaving Jarrod for dead. A couple of years later, people begin to disappear, kidnapped in the night. This happens at the same time that Jarrod, who is now in a wheelchair, wants to reopen his museum, with new figures that resemble some of the people that disappeared. He claims that he uses pictures of the missing people in the paper as a muse for the figures, but a women named Sue knows better.
Read more ›
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again.
1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Nix Pix on Aug. 5 2003
Format: DVD
"House of Wax" is a remake of "Mysteries of the Wax Museum" - both films are featured on this flipper disc from Warner Brothers. The plots of each film center around a gifted sculptor who, after suffering a terrible deception at the hands of his business associate, becomes psychotic and thereafter dips human subjects in wax to make his mannequins. "House of Wax" has three advantages over its predicessor; first - it was shot in Technicolor (not 2-tone Technicolor), second - it was shot in 3-D (then a relatively new gimmick) and third - it features goul, Vincent Price as the mad sculptor.
There's no kind way of saying this: The transfers on both movies are AN ABSOLUTE HORROR! "House of Wax" is plagued by faded colors, out of focus images, color bleeding, weak and/or undistinguished black and contrast levels and an incredible amount of film grain that makes the entire image very gritty on the eyes. Flesh tones are extremely inconsistent, appearing -for the most part - a overly pinkish mess. Of course, the film is NOT PRESENTED IN 3-D as the cover art and film credits indicate, leaving the usual banality of tossing things at the screen a wasted effort in flat projection. The audio track is mono, strident and poorly balanced.
"Mysteries of the Wax Museum" suffers from heavy age related artifacts, digital compression artifacts, edge enhancement and the inherant short-comings of the two tone color process that, even at its best (which this transfer is no where near) is weak on a spectrum of color. Once again the audio track is mono.
EXTRAS: A theatrical trailer for "House of Wax". Thanks a lot!
BOTTOM LINE: "House of Wax" is one of those super kitsch films that could only have been made in the fifties. But in the deplorable looking transfer we've been given and minus its 3-D appeal, there's really nothing to recommend this disc to anyone but a die hard Vincent Price fan.
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again.
1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Z. D. Houghton on July 18 2004
Format: DVD
Has anyone ever portrayed the Nice Man Gone Crazy as well as Vincent Price? Of course not, and in House of Wax, Price is in top form as a loving sculptor who emerges from a fire with a different, errr, method for creating his wax sculptures. I don't know about you, but just the thought of being alone in a wax museum after dark gives me the creeps. Add a dose of homicidal mania, and there's your recipe for terror.
Most people will find this movie creepy even today; those who love camp will enjoy the prolonged ping-pong paddle scene catered to the orginal 3-D audience.
All in all, one of Vincent Price's best films, proving once again that nobody goes horribly insane quite like Vincent Price.
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again.
2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By tony riccardi on Feb. 28 2013
Format: DVD Verified Purchase
There was no noticeable 3d , very poor, i was expecting alot more especially with the scene with the bouncing ball coming out at the audience
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again.
Format: DVD
What a contrast there is between the two cinematic accounts of this tale of horror and gore! "Mystery of the Wax Museum" is the earlier of the two, from 1933, set in the "roaring '20s" then moving onwards to the "flirty '30s", is faster moving, racier, and more light-hearted, a tale of a sassy gal reporter as much as, or more, than a tale of the macabre. Fay Wray, of gorilla-hugging fame in R.K.O. Studios' "King Kong", is the lass whose life the mad sculptor of wax and of human flesh (acted by Lionel Atwill) cuts short to become the corpse which the "artist" and his apprentices wax for the Joan of Arc exhibit in the infamous museum, but it is Glenda Farrell who plays the delectable part of the girl reporter! The 1933 film moves along at a lively clip and is, well, even a bit frantically paced, and a lot of fun.

The 1953 film, for its part titled "House of Wax", set in Edwardian times and starring Vincent Price, is the one that scared all of my childhood friends witless who went to see it, back then, for fifty cents admission or so, but for which I, turning ten years old that year, did not have the admission money (the Saturday kiddies' matinée of those times, usually only asking twenty-five cents admission for more ordinary triple bills of three movies, news reels, and cartoons, a 3-D film costing twice as much). Atwill and Price both are lugubrious characters, but, alas, so are too many of the other members of the later cast, making the 1953 film, even if only compared to the 1933 effort, a rather blandly genteel cinematic outing.

Both films look good as Warner Home Video's double-sided DVD. the two movies backing each other on the disc (bearing catalogue number 11054 for the North American edition viewed).
Read more ›
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again.

Most recent customer reviews


Look for similar items by category


Feedback