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Hamlet Paperback – Sep 24 1992


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Product Details

  • Paperback: 128 pages
  • Publisher: Dover Publications; Reprinted edition edition (Sept. 24 1992)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0486272788
  • ISBN-13: 978-0486272788
  • Product Dimensions: 20.8 x 13.2 x 1 cm
  • Shipping Weight: 100 g
  • Average Customer Review: 4.2 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (141 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: #6,823 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)
  • See Complete Table of Contents

Product Description

From Amazon

Undoubtedly the most famous of all of Shakespeare's plays, Hamlet remains one of the most enduring but also enigmatic pieces of western literature. The story of Hamlet, the young Prince of Denmark, his tortured relationship with his mother, and his quest to avenge his father's murder at the hand of his brother Claudius has fascinated writers and audiences ever since it was written around 1600.

For many years interest focused on both Hamlet's inability to avenge his father's death, claiming that "the native hue of resolution / Is sicklied o'er with the pale cast of thought", and, according to none other than Freud, his oedipal fixation with his mother. However, more recently critics have turned their attention to Hamlet's bold theatrical self-reflexivity (most famously reflected in the performance of "The Mousetrap"), its fascination with issues of theology and Renaissance humanism, and its dense, complex poetic language. What is so remarkable about the play is the way in which it tends to uncannily reflect the concerns of different epochs. As a result, Hamlet has been at different moments defined as a romantic rebel, an angst-ridden existentialist, a paralysed intellectual and an ambivalent New Man. Whatever subsequent generations make of Hamlet, they are unlikely to exhaust the possibilities of this most extraordinary play. --Jerry Brotton --This text refers to an alternate Paperback edition.

From Library Journal

The big H comes to Penguin's great revamped "Pelican Shakespeare" line. What else do you need to know? Buy it!
Copyright 2002 Cahners Business Information, Inc. --This text refers to an alternate Paperback edition.

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Customer Reviews

4.2 out of 5 stars

Most helpful customer reviews

1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By A. Matsen on March 1 2000
Format: Mass Market Paperback
I absolutely love Shakespeare and Hamlet is my favorite Shakespearian play thus far. Besides Shakespeare's usual flare for the English language, Hamlet's quick wit, philosophical and artful masterpieces of soliloque, and a wonderfully tragic plot make Hamlet an engaging read (or viewing, I've done both). The characters arouse all the sympathy, hatred, and love they were intended to. I read this play in a matter of days because I couldn't put it down. If you don't have time to read this play, or comprehending the language is a trial PLEASE see it somewhere. Watching the actors and listening to their voice inflections will help a lot, I promise.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on Dec 10 1999
Format: Mass Market Paperback
I am writing this review not so much as in reference to any one particular title, rather to the Folger Library editions of Shakepeare. I find this company's books to be of most value when reading Shakepeare because the book reviews terms no longer used,and helps to make plots clearer. It is often hard for some to understand the complexities of Shakeperean work, and I have seen the way Folger's organizes their books help readers to understand them better. Any book you order from this company will be enlightening and helpful, providing you with a more enjoyable exposure the Shakespeare's great works.
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By bernie TOP 100 REVIEWER on Sept. 23 2006
Format: Paperback
This really is "The Tragical History of Hamlet Prince of Denmark" and not only the Prince but his family. Not only his family but his friends. Not only his friends but all though that came before him and is told to those that came after him.

You can slow down and pick apart many underlying themes and may of the phrases that now challenge Bible sayings in today's sound bites. But the real fun is in just reading the story and you will find that it is not as foreign as you may have thought.

A quick synopsis is that Old Hamlet conquered Old Fortinbras seizing his land. Now that Old Hamlet is dead, Young Fortinbras wants his land back and is willing to take it by force. Meanwhile back in D'nemark Young Hamlet who is excessively grieving for the loss of his father, gets a now insight from his fathers ghost. Looks like he was a victim of a "murder most foul"; it looks like his mother and uncle were in cahoots on the murder.

The story is about what each person felt and acted or did not act upon the situation.

You will find many movies and perverted imitations of the story but nothing will replace the original that was intended to be watched but reads well.
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By bernie TOP 100 REVIEWER on July 16 2006
Format: Paperback
This really is "The Tragical History of Hamlet Prince of Denmark" and not only the Prince but his family. Not only his family but his friends. Not only his friends but all though that came before him and is told to those that came after him.

You can take time to scrutinize and pick apart many underlying themes or may of the phrases that now challenge Bible sayings in today's sound bites. But the real fun is in just reading the story and you will find that it is not as foreign as you may have thought.

A quick synopsis is that Old Hamlet conquered Old Fortinbras seizing his land. Now that Old Hamlet is dead, Young Fortinbras wants his land back and is willing to take it by force. Meanwhile back in D'nemark Young Hamlet who is excessively grieving for the loss of his father, gets a now insight from his fathers ghost. Looks like he was a victim of a "murder most foul"; it looks like his mother and uncle were in cahoots on the murder.

The story is about what each person felt and acted or did not act upon the situation.

You will find many movies and perverted imitations of the story but nothing will replace the original scripts that were intended to be watched.
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
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By bernie TOP 100 REVIEWER on July 18 2005
Format: Paperback
This really is "The Tragical History of Hamlet Prince of Denmark" and not only the Prince but his family. Not only his family but his friends. Not only his friends but all though that came before him and is told to those that came after him.

You can take time to scrutinize and pick apart many underlying themes or may of the phrases that now challenge Bible sayings in today's sound bites. But the real fun is in just reading the story and you will find that it is not as foreign as you may have thought.

A quick synopsis is that Old Hamlet conquered Old Fortinbras seizing his land. Now that Old Hamlet is dead, Young Fortinbras wants his land back and is willing to take it by force. Meanwhile back in Dänemark Young Hamlet who is excessively grieving for the loss of his father, gets a now insight from his fathers ghost. Looks like he was a victim of a "murder most foul"; it looks like his mother and uncle were in cahoots on the murder.

The story is about what each person felt and acted or did not act upon the situation.

You will find many movies and perverted imitations of the story but nothing will replace the original scripts that were intended to be watched.
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
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By A Customer on Dec 14 2002
Format: Mass Market Paperback
Like another reviewer wrote, Hamlet is a tragedy of youth, but it isn't the tragedy of lost innocence, it's a tragedy of youthful rashness. Yes, I said rashness. Hamlet doesn't think too much, he thinks too rashly, too hastily, without mature consideration. Just because his mother is a whore he quickly concludes that all women therefore must be whores. This is why he torments Ophelia and bids her, "get thee to a nunnery". This is why he decries, "woman, thy name weakness". This is why he's despondent and unable to respond to his father's injunctions.
There are plenty of examples in the play of this youthful recklessness. Laertes, when he learns of his father's death, immediately rushes back to Denmark and assembles an army to exact revenge. Fortinbras does the same thing in order to retake the land his father lost to Hamlet's father. Both are checked in their youthful exuberance by their respective kings. Polonius' advice to his son is nothing but words of caution against youthful excesses (drink, women, gambling). Polonius' advice to his daughter is nothing but strictures against falling hopelessly in love with Hamlet. The little dialogue between Hamlet and Rosencrantz about the state of theater in London is about how a wild and vociferous younger generation of actors have sabotaged the stage and are holding the older generation at bay.
Hamlet himself exhibits other rash behavior. When he sees Ophelia's funeral procession and hears Laertes' expressions of grief, he (Hamlet), regardless of the danger he throws himself in, he recklessly jumps into the procession and proclaims HIS love above the brother's. When Hamlet first sees the ghost he doesn't think to question whether the apparition is authentic. He believes it instinctively.
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