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The Hangman's Beautiful Daughter Turtleback – Aug 1 1995


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Turtleback, Aug 1 1995
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Product Details

  • Turtleback: 381 pages
  • Publisher: Demco Media (August 1995)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0606061479
  • ISBN-13: 978-0606061476
  • Product Dimensions: 20.6 x 15 x 2.5 cm
  • Shipping Weight: 522 g
  • Average Customer Review: 4.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (29 customer reviews)


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The road was dark. Read the first page
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Customer Reviews

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By blackrock woman on July 9 2013
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
"sharyn mcccrumb" on a book is a surety of star quality talent. I will save and read them again. she really picks me up and puts me in her mountains. I would and have praised her to all my friends and their brothers. not just girlie books.
loved this book too! shaon
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Format: Mass Market Paperback
There is no doubt about it. Sharyn McCrumb is a highly gifted author and this book proves that yet again. She has an incredible sense of voice and feeling. In relating the issues of poverty and environmental concerns, her lyrical (for lack of a better word) descriptions of the settings ring strong and clear. In reading this work, as with her other "Ballad" books, one feels almost transported to the places she describes. Sharyn McCrumb does an exceptional job of intwining the social horrors of poverty and pollution with the gentle beauty of the mountains. It is her voice, as clear as a bell, as soothing as a bird song that makes this book so darn good.
Her characters are all richly drawn and given fresh, literary life. Her sense of dialog is outstanding and there is nothing extraneous in her work. Sharyn McCrumb is here to stay.
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By A Customer on May 29 2004
Format: Mass Market Paperback
McCrumb has a tendency to toss in one completely unrealistic plot device to keep her stories moving in the way she wants them to go. In The Hangman's Beautiful Daughter, it's the ridiculously non-existant guardianship of the Underhill teens. Can you say, "Ward of the state?"
Also, what was with the whole thing about the Judds? Particularly since all the facts were wrong. McCrumb has Martha tell Spencer that the liver is the one organ that doesn't get better, when reality is exactly the opposite. The liver is the ONLY regenerative organ in the body. Also, what's with the talk of the hepatitis coming from bad road food? If you don't want to go into the modes of transmission of hepatitis C, don't make it a subplot. As someone with a family member with hep C, the misinformation here really annoyed me. It's horribly nitpicky to say it affected my enjoyment of the rest of the book, but I kept thinking, what other facts has she gotten completely wrong? not her best effort at all.
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By Cass on April 30 2004
Format: Mass Market Paperback
I started reading this book b/c of it the title. I love sort of off beat book titles and this was certainly different. It was depressing and didn't make a whole big bunch of sense. However I was intrigued with the writing and plot quality. I became enthralled with the SEER stuff and things of the supernatural. Being from the dark woods of the Ozarks I can totally respect those points of the book.
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By "turtlechick" on May 13 2003
Format: Mass Market Paperback
Nora Bonesteel, the wise woman of the Tennessee mountains is what her Celtic forebears would recognize as an "edge witch", one who patrols the boundaries between life and death, good and evil, the supernatural and the mundane. In this novel sorrow comes to the mountain community in the guise of an murder/suicide on a remote farm and via a polluted river that brings death into the valley. Nora Bonesteel, with her graveyard quilt and her herbal remedies does what she can do to protect the ordinary folk from tragedy. This is a wonderful novel to trace the continuance of Celtic heritage and folkways into America's Eastern mountains which were settled by Britain's Highlanders.
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By Theresa W on April 29 2003
Format: Mass Market Paperback
I read the first book in this series, Pretty Peggy-O and read this one right after. This book still seemed to have the author finding her way as a writer, but it was better than the first. And that's not to say I didn't like the first, I did. I liked this one better, but I think it still earns a 4. I am on to the next books in the series and I'm really excited, I think McCrumb has great potential as a writer. She creates stories and characters that you just seem to become wrapped up in. This is definitely a good susepense story.
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Format: School & Library Binding
I picked up this book reluctantly, because I have always found mysteries to be stale and boring. But this book has a way of pulling you in that you never want to get back out. It starts out that this big family gets murdered, all but two, and they know that one of the brothers did it and committed suicide when he was done. The reluctant wife of the minister is sent to deal with the survivors. The story goes from there, hopping from one person's point of view to another's, with many different little side-stories inter-twining all into one big picture. The characters are beautifully and sadly drawn, and all of the different stories come together with such preciseness that the reader is amazed. A definite must read.
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Format: Mass Market Paperback
There are several books that I call my "Seasonal Affective Disorder" books. I reread them every year during the dark nights of January, and they lift me up out of the winter doldrums. _The Hangman's Beautiful Daughter_ is the exact opposite. I read it in the middle of July, and it *gave* me a case of the winter doldrums. Sharyn McCrumb uses lovely prose to drag us into the depths of an Appalachian winter, where the tragedies are as pervasive as the cold.
Laura Bruce, the wife of the local minister, is summoned to the home of a family she barely knows, where the oldest son has shot his parents, youngest brother, and himself, leaving the two middle kids (who were out at the time) alive but distraught. This isn't really a mystery--there is no question as to whodunit, or even why--I guess I've read too many books, but I knew exactly what the family secret was from the very beginning. The question is, whay will become of the two remaining teenagers now that they are alone in the world? The law demands a guardian until the older sibling, the boy, reaches 18 in a few months. Laura Bruce takes on the position, but not the responsibility; she sees it mainly as a formality and doesn't check on them much. As the winter progresses, Laura becomes preoccupied with her own problems, and completely ignores the teenagers until disaster (quite literally) strikes. Hello? Why did Laura marry a minister if she didn't want to assume the social role of a minister's wife? And why, why, WHY did she agree to become these poor kids' guardian if she wasn't going to even give them a call once in a blue moon? Yes, I know she has her own problems, but she is almost forty, these kids are in high school, and she accepted the responsibility. She's an adult, and she doesn't act like one.
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