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Harry Potter and the Goblet of Fire (Book 4) Hardcover – Aug 1 2000

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Hardcover, Aug 1 2000
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Product Details

  • Hardcover: 734 pages
  • Publisher: Scholastic Press (Aug. 1 2000)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0439139597
  • ISBN-13: 978-0439139595
  • Product Dimensions: 5.7 x 15.9 x 24.1 cm
  • Shipping Weight: 1.1 Kg
  • Average Customer Review: 4.8 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (4,278 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: #244,396 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Product Description

Harry Potter And The Goblet Of Fire (Book 4)

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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By Daniel Jolley TOP 100 REVIEWER on June 21 2006
Format: Hardcover
It is quite hard to believe just how good Harry Potter and the Goblet of Fire is; the first three books, all of which impressed me deeply, seem almost forgettable compared to this intense fourth entry in the series. This is as rich a reading experience as you will find, no matter what your age. The storyline as it exists at the end of this mammoth epic has more of a hold on me now, as an adult, than the Star Wars saga had on me as a kid, which is saying a great deal, I assure you. One barely knows where to start one's praises of this book; yes, it does have both dark overtones and undertones to it, yet it also boasts some of the funniest moments of the series. We learn a great deal more about the major characters and turn our attention to new attractions such as the unique new Defense Against the Dark Arts professor, Mad-Eye Moody. Events in magical circles outside of Hogwarts increase the landscape of Rowling's magical world many times over as we are given insight into the workings of the Ministry of Magic, are treated to the best seat in the house at the Quidditch World Cup championship, and are introduced to two wholly new magical schools in foreign locations. The pattern one might have come to expect of Harry's fourth year at Hogwarts is thrown immediately out of the window; there are no school Quidditch matches this year, nor is there even an inter-house cup competition. Instead, Professor Dumbledore makes the extraordinary announcement that the Triwizard Tournament has not only been reinstituted after many years, it will take place at Hogwarts. Only sixth- and seventh-year students are eligible to compete, seeming to leave Harry Potter quite out of the mix, which is fine by him.Read more ›
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Soccergirl on Feb. 2 2003
Format: Audio CD
Harry gets himself into yet more trouble as his name is drawn to compete against other schools of witchcraft and wizardry as a Hogwarts school Champion. He wishes he were just spectating the tournament, but someone put his name in the Goblet of Fire to get him in trouble! Strange things start happening, but Harry gets help from the new Defense Against the Arts Teacher Mad Eye Moody. Harry has taken a liking to Moody until he realizes the awful truth. In the fourth and final task of the tournament, Harry finds himself tied with Cedric Diggory, the only Seeker ever to beat Harry. He encounters Voldemort where Diggory is killed by the UNFORGIVABLE CURSE Avada Kedavra. Harry meets his parents and Voldemort takes away his only protection given to him by his mother that lead to the temporary downfall of the Dark Lord!
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Format: Hardcover
The story begins with a murder committed far away from Hogwarts. Yes, this one is way darker than the first three Harry Potter books. JK Rowling has handled this superbly well. The children who must have been lapping up the books were also growing along with Harry Potter. The negative picture of the story has been introduced in stages. Excellent!

Harry goes to stay at the Weasleys home towards the end of the summer holidays. Harry, Ron and Hermione get the opportunity of a lifetime – to go to the Quidditch World Cup match along with Mr. Weasley, Percy, Fred, George and Ginny. The ground where the match is to take place is totally bewitched with more than a million witches and wizards from around the world coming together to watch the match. One has to read the sequence to understand the magnitude of the author’s imagination as she describes the scene. Then, there is the match itself with the veelas (introducing yet another batch of magical creatures in the form of beautiful women) and Leprechauns fighting it out (literally) on behalf of the players of their countries.

There is Barty Crouch from the ministry and Ludo Bagman who is supposed to be in charge of organizing the match - interesting characters that move the story along.

The Dark Mark is set off immediately after the match and the Death Eaters (Lord Voldemort’s followers) are rather excited. This brings about the question whether the evil Voldemort is coming back.

The fourth year begins at Hogwarts and this year, they get yet another defense against the dark arts teacher in the form of Professor Moody. Moody has the oddest appearance that one could have ever seen. Beautifully described!
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Format: Hardcover
J.K. follows up her first mature story with a bit of a departure to the past. One last shout-out to a young child's story, but at over 700 pages, she stretches this jaunt to previous elements somewhat too long. Thankfully the beginning and ending harkens us back to the edgier Potter we get for the rest of the series. Harry Potter and the Goblet of Fire by J.K. Rowling is another transition book.

To start with, what did not thrill me. The games of the Triwizard tournament really do not hold my interest that much, or at all. While she does an admirable job of expanding the wizarding universe and make the magic more sensible and workable, the actual tournament just strikes me as another plot device to facilitate her "Year In The Life" structure. So often a new challenge would pop up, and my interests would wane and wait for the real story to kick into high gear. Another idea started, and thankfully ending here, is Ron being a compete dolt. For those Potterheads about to argue here, Hallows was a different reason because Ron was noticeably under the influence. His character turn to jerk comes out of nowhere and is only resolved when he realizes Harry is yet again in mortal danger. Yes, I know Ron has an inferiority complex, but hating your best friend simply because you believe life sucks is not how the Weasleys raised him.

As for what worked in Goblet? The very beginning, with the horrors of the history of the Riddle house, has all the hallmarks of J.K. hitting her stride. The absolute gothic despair mixed with urban legends and topped by exotic folklore all fill the pages with dread. It just feels like a stew of evil was always boiling in Tom Riddle's life, and we see further along in this series, the roots of this goes even further.
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