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Harry Potter and the Order of the Phoenix [Unabridged] [Audio Cassette]

J.K. Rowling , Jim Dale , Jim Dale
4.6 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (1,080 customer reviews)

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Kindle Edition CDN $12.95  
Hardcover CDN $18.81  
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Audio, CD, Audiobook, Unabridged CDN $72.10  
Audio, Cassette, Unabridged, June 21 2003 --  
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Book Description

June 21 2003 Harry Potter (Book 5)
There is a door at the end of a silent corridor. And it's haunting Harry Potter's dreams. Why else would he be waking in the middle of the night, screaming in terror?

Here are just a few things on Harry's mind:

• A Defense Against the Dark Arts teacher with a personality like poisoned honey.

• A venomous, disgruntled house-elf

• Ron as keeper of the Gryffindor Quidditch team

• The looming terror of the end-of-term Ordinary Wizarding Level exams

. . . and of course, the growing threat of He-Who-Must-Not-Be-Named. In the richest installment yet of J. K. Rowling's seven-part story, Harry Potter is faced with the unreliability of the very government of the magical world and the impotence of the authorities at Hogwarts.

Despite this (or perhaps because of it), he finds depth and strength in his friends, beyond what even he knew, boundless loyalty; and unbearable sacrifice.

Though thick runs the plot, listeners will race through these tapes and leave Hogwarts, like Harry, wishing only for the next train back.

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From Amazon

As his fifth year at Hogwarts School of Witchcraft and Wizardry approaches, 15-year-old Harry Potter is in full-blown adolescence, complete with regular outbursts of rage, a nearly debilitating crush, and the blooming of a powerful sense of rebellion. It's been yet another infuriating and boring summer with the despicable Dursleys, this time with minimal contact from our hero's non-Muggle friends from school. Harry is feeling especially edgy at the lack of news from the magic world, wondering when the freshly revived evil Lord Voldemort will strike. Returning to Hogwarts will be a relief...or will it?

The fifth book in J.K. Rowling's Harry Potter series follows the darkest year yet for our young wizard, who finds himself knocked down a peg or three after the events of last year. Somehow, over the summer, gossip (usually traced back to the magic world's newspaper, the Daily Prophet) has turned Harry's tragic and heroic encounter with Voldemort at the Triwizard Tournament into an excuse to ridicule and discount the teen. Even Professor Dumbledore, headmaster of the school, has come under scrutiny by the Ministry of Magic, which refuses to officially acknowledge the terrifying truth: that Voldemort is back. Enter a particularly loathsome new character: the toad-like and simpering ("hem, hem") Dolores Umbridge, senior undersecretary to the Minister of Magic, who takes over the vacant position of Defense Against Dark Arts teacher--and in no time manages to become the High Inquisitor of Hogwarts, as well. Life isn't getting any easier for Harry Potter. With an overwhelming course load as the fifth years prepare for their Ordinary Wizarding Levels examinations (O.W.L.s), devastating changes in the Gryffindor Quidditch team lineup, vivid dreams about long hallways and closed doors, and increasing pain in his lightning-shaped scar, Harry's resilience is sorely tested.

Harry Potter and the Order of the Phoenix, more than any of the four previous novels in the series, is a coming-of-age story. Harry faces the thorny transition into adulthood, when adult heroes are revealed to be fallible, and matters that seemed black and white suddenly come out in shades of gray. Gone is the wide-eyed innocent, the whiz kid of Philosopher's Stone. Here we have an adolescent who's sometimes sullen, often confused (especially about girls), and always self-questioning. Confronting death again, as well as a startling prophecy, Harry ends his year at Hogwarts exhausted and pensive. Readers, on the other hand, will be energized as they enter yet again the long waiting period for the next title in the marvelous, magical series. (Ages 9 and older) --Emilie Coulter

From School Library Journal

Grade 4 Up-Harry has just returned to Hogwarts after a lonely summer. Dumbledore is uncommunicative and most of the students seem to think Harry is either conceited or crazy for insisting that Voldemort is back and as evil as ever. Angry, scared, and unable to confide in his godfather, Sirius, the teen wizard lashes out at his friends and enemies alike. The head of the Ministry of Magic is determined to discredit Dumbledore and undermine his leadership of Hogwarts, and he appoints nasty, pink-cardigan-clad Professor Umbridge as the new Defense Against the Dark Arts teacher and High Inquisitor of the school, bringing misery upon staff and students alike. This bureaucratic nightmare, added to Harry's certain knowledge that Voldemort is becoming more powerful, creates a desperate, Kafkaesque feeling during Harry's fifth year at Hogwarts. The adults all seem evil, misguided, or simply powerless, so the students must take matters into their own hands. Harry's confusion about his godfather and father, and his apparent rejection by Dumbledore make him question his own motives and the condition of his soul. Also, Harry is now 15, and the hormones are beginning to kick in. There are a lot of secret doings, a little romance, and very little Quidditch or Hagrid (more reasons for Harry's gloom), but the power of this book comes from the young magician's struggles with his emotions and identity. Particularly moving is the unveiling, after a final devastating tragedy, of Dumbledore's very strong feelings of attachment and responsibility toward Harry. Children will enjoy the magic and the Hogwarts mystique, and young adult readers will find a rich and compelling coming-of-age story as well.
Eva Mitnick, Los Angeles Public Library
Copyright 2003 Reed Business Information, Inc. --This text refers to the Hardcover edition.

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Customer Reviews

Most helpful customer reviews
3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Look at it logically... July 8 2003
Format:Audio CD
I thought that this book was positively amazing. Not only has Ms. Rowling continued to manage the complex wizarding world she has created in the last 4 books, but she has continued to make the emotions and lives of her characters real and down to earth. Creating an entire society with laws, governments, thousands of citizens, as well as dramatic events and problems, while managing to keep all the details straight cannot be easy. Also in this book you can truly see how the characters are growing and changing with the times. Harry's rage, while at first annoying and unwelcome, later shows the response of any humane person. He is worried about the safety of his friends, he is cut off from any useful information, he is put under enormous pressure in preparation for O.W.L.s, he is being called a liar, many beliefs and ideals he has clung to for support have recently been crushed, and much more. Perhaps it is just me but under those circumstances I'd be upset and full of rage too. I'm fifteen and a sophomore in high school and it took me about 15 hours to read the book (I'm somewhat sorry I read so fast). I firmly believe that while many of the decisions Ms. Rowling made in the writing of this book were widely unpopular (as is evident by many of these reviews), it was honest, realistic, and absolutely amazing. If anything had been changed or left out of the book I think that it would have lost much of the realism and brutal honesty we have come to expect for the wonderful world of Harry Potter.
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Exceeding expectations... for adults June 21 2003
Format:Hardcover
After years of waiting, the 5th book in the Harry potter series has finally been released.
Continuing on from the exciting advantures of the first 4 books, the Order of the Phoenix contains many interesting incidents, but also Harry Potter's first love interest, and revelations about Harry's nemesis, the evil Lord Voldemort.
Many of the questions we have all asked after the last book are now getting answered, are Harry and Voldemort linked more than they realised, and what on earth is Snape doing among the evil Death Eaters again?
However, I cannot lie and say everything about this book is good. Once again, as in many series of books bydifferent authors, as the main character grows older, you yourself must be older to fully understand the book, especially since the love interest will mean little to a reader aged 9 who has never had a girlfriend or boyfriend. The language used is more advanced than ever meaning that younger readers may struggle, and the increased levels of violence and death, while written of in a very lighthearted way, are slightly more disturbing than anything in the first 3 books, continuing the lines of the latter quarter of the 4th book.
I believe Joanne Rowling has finally come to realise that in England, her own country, her adult readers are more common than her child readers, and as a result she is writing to aim more at these older readers - afterall, parents must buy the book for their child, so will inevitably end up reading it themselves, either to their child, or themself.
Whatever the reasons, this book is even more gripping than the first 4 - the development of characters has reached a peak until we can fully understand the emotions and aims of the characters - whatever else can be said about the book, this is a wonderful book.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars The Best Yet July 2 2003
Format:Audio Cassette
Why would an adult be interested in Harry Potter? Because J. K. Rowling is the best storyteller since Tolkien. Part of the reason is that like Tolkein, Rowling prepared her world prior to writing the books. The reported outline of the seven episodes allows her to develop richness in plot and character development with which other series cannot compare.
Order of the Phoenix is the best yet. The quality of the character development is superb. Her description of the frustration and anger of the adolescent Harry is outstanding. Hermione's development rivals Harry's in scope and her quip to Ron about his inability to fathom Cho's emotions probably is one of the more succinct descriptions of the differences between the sexes in existence. Ron's dealing with an increasingly complex relationship with his friends and his tenure at Hogwarts is well done.
Additionally, we are treated to a developing depth of prose. Rowling's description of the change from October to November is almost poetic.
Aside from a great imagination combined with a great storyteller's gift, Rowling is just fun to read.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Audio even better than the print edition!!!!! July 13 2003
Format:Audio CD
Jim Dale does an amazing job bringing Rowling's characters to life!! He gives each charater his or her own voice and personality. I know that I would not appreciate the Potter books half as much if I read them in the print edition. For example, I found myself laughing out loud when Dale described Loona Lovegood on the Hogworts Express-- I know that I probably would have just breezed right through this part in the print edition without much thought.
The story itself is awesome-- each book has become more "adult" and is much better than the last. I can't wait for the next installment!
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Harry's adventures enter a larger world June 24 2003
By A Customer
Format:Hardcover
I took the day off of work to read this book basically cover to cover, so obviously I'm a big fan. That said, the end of book four set up a great expansion of the scope of the story that would be covered in this series, and I had some trepidation as to whether or not J.K. Rowling would be able to pull it off (especially under the immense pressure of currently being the world's most popular author, among her many other commitments). To my great delight, she succeeded brilliantly! In my mind, each book of the Harry Potter series as been better than the ones preceding it, and J.K. Rowling has accomplished this feat yet again. Book five is the best of the series so far, and I fully expect this trend to continue through books six and seven. While I found the first book in the series (particularly the beginning) to be somewhat formulaic, this series has really grown in the telling. The characters in book five become more complex and the sense of Harry and his friends going through their teenage years is well conveyed. The stakes are higher, the emotions deeper, and the intricacies of the plot increased. The heart of the story remains the courage and friendship of youth overcoming adversity. I recommend this book (and the entire series) whole-heartedly to children and adults alike.
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Most recent customer reviews
5.0 out of 5 stars Another important link in the chain of stories about Harry Potter and...
Love all of the books. This volume sheds important light on Harry's transition from boy to young man. Read more
Published 21 days ago by BGreenwood
5.0 out of 5 stars Jut gets better with age!
My children and I have read Order of the Phoenix multiple times and enjoyed it each time. There is always something new to discover with each read. Read more
Published 1 month ago by Mama Bert
5.0 out of 5 stars The fifth book gets quite serious with unexpected turns that shake up...
Harry is terribly upset with everyone – his godfather Sirius, Professor Dumbledore and especially his best friends Ron and Hermione. Read more
Published 5 months ago by Sundari Venkatraman
5.0 out of 5 stars Great
Just like the rest of the harry potter series this book is amazing, nothing is left to the imagination Rowling has a way with words. READ NOW~!
Published 8 months ago by naomi bir
4.0 out of 5 stars Good condition and a good book
I am filling our my Harry Potter collection and glad to add in #5. The book came in good condition and withing the estimated time.
Published 8 months ago by Ann C.
5.0 out of 5 stars Great book!
I have read the full collection of Harry Potter books, and I love them all! This series of books is well written, and allows you to escape to another world.
Published 9 months ago by Josee
5.0 out of 5 stars Awesome read
I loved the Potter series. It is worth reading even if you have seen the movies. It gives you more insight into the charaters and also includes thoughts, ideas and extras that... Read more
Published 17 months ago by K. Sheppard
5.0 out of 5 stars Order of the Phoenix
Great book, great series. The Book was a little more worn then described but overall I am happy with it
Published 19 months ago by Oubouu
5.0 out of 5 stars Harry Potter and the Order of the Phoenix: To Speak The Truth With...
We are over half way through the wonderfully amazing Harry Potter series, and from this point onwards every book is almost universally great. Read more
Published 24 months ago by Scoopriches
5.0 out of 5 stars Harry Potter you're growing up
Love The Order of The Phoenix. JK Rowling just keeps getting better and better keeping us wanting more of the story. Read more
Published on Sept. 3 2012 by K. L. Craddock
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