Havana World Series: A Novel and over one million other books are available for Amazon Kindle. Learn more

Vous voulez voir cette page en français ? Cliquez ici.

Have one to sell? Sell yours here
Start reading Havana World Series: A Novel on your Kindle in under a minute.

Don't have a Kindle? Get your Kindle here, or download a FREE Kindle Reading App.

Havana World Series: A Novel [Hardcover]

Jose Latour
5.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (1 customer review)

Available from these sellers.


Formats

Amazon Price New from Used from
Kindle Edition CDN $9.33  
Hardcover --  
Paperback CDN $12.76  
Join Amazon Student in Canada


Book Description

Jan. 21 2004
Internationally acclaimed author Jose Latour brings to life the flavor and rhythm of old Havana in a dark, sultry novel of intrigue. It is the fall of 1958 and all of Cuba is riveted by the World Series-Mickey Mantle's New York Yankees are playing the Milwaukee Braves and bets are coming in fast and furious. Thanks to his friends in the country's troubled dictatorship, the infamous Meyer Lansky's gambling empire is raking in millions, much to the envy of rival mafia boss Joe Bonanno. With a team of Cuba's boldest and most ingenious criminals, Bonanno plans to hijack the small fortune Lansky stands to gain from a Yankees win. The heist goes off brilliantly until Bonanno's point man is double-crossed and shot dead. As Lansky's man in the police department investigates the murder, he suspects the involvement of career criminal Mariano Contreras - and to get Bonanno out of the Cuban racket once and for all, Lansky will stop at nothing to track Contreras down. Alive with vibrant detail and a fantastic cast of misfit characters, Havana World Series is first-rate crime fiction and a brilliant portrait of a torn country hungry for revolution.

Product Details


Product Description

From Publishers Weekly

Cuban-born Latour's eighth book, the third novel he's written in English, pits Cuban crooks against an American crime boss in bustling, pre-Communist Havana. It's 1958, and Meyer Lansky is looking to make a killing-not just from his casino, but from all the betting on the World Series between the Yankees and the Milwaukee Braves. But mobsters Joe Bonanno and Joseph Profaci, Meyer's New York-based rivals, want a piece of the action, so they assemble a home team of criminals to rob Lansky's casino on the last night of the series. Led by Mariano "Ox" Contreras (so-called for the first thing he ever stole), they're a lively gang of smalltime swindlers, including "Wheel" Fermin, a short, balding and surprisingly prudish car thief, Arturo Heller, a smooth ex-law student, and Willy Pi, a former prostitute and cork bark collector who works at Lansky's Casino de Capri. Their heist-despite having to begin two hours ahead of schedule owing to the death of Pope Pius XII, in whose honor the casino plans to close early-goes very well. But it doesn't go perfectly, which gives the Bureau of Investigations, in the person of Col. Orlando Grava, a place to work from. Meyer Lansky, who's good friends with the struggling President Batista, can't wait to get his hands on the culprits either. But can anyone, good guy or bad, be fully trusted? Latour's occasionally stilted prose ("for of late he had become a man of archaic immorality") hardly detracts from a lively, entertaining read.
Copyright © Reed Business Information, a division of Reed Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

From Booklist

Thrillers set in Cuba have been washing up on these shores at an ever-increasing rate (see "Cuban Noir" [BKL My 1 03]), but in terms of verisimilitude, Cuban-born Latour's work stands apart. In Outcast (1999), he put a human face on the daily deprivations of life in contemporary Cuba; this time he looks behind the neon decadence of pre-Castro, Mafia-run Havana. In a documentary-like narrative that combines the gritty fatalism of Bob Le Flambeur and the meticulous detail of Ocean's Eleven, Latour tells the story of a gang of Cuban crooks, funded by New York Mob boss Joe Bonanno, who sets out to rob Meyer Lansky's Capri casino on the last day of the 1958 World Series (when the coffers are overflowing). The portraits of Lansky, Bonnano, and the other gangsters are full-bodied, but it's the fictional blue-collar crooks, led by mastermind Ox Contreras, who give the novel its appeal and afford the best view of Cuban life. Although the documentary style occasionally seems flat, it contrasts nicely with the richness of detail and quirkiness of character. Bill Ott
Copyright © American Library Association. All rights reserved

Inside This Book (Learn More)
First Sentence
The last day that Angelo Dick spent in Havana, Cube-October 1, 1958-began in a most auspicious way around 2 A.M., in the ascending elevator cage of the plush, twenty-two-story apartment building where he lived. Read the first page
Explore More
Concordance
Browse Sample Pages
Front Cover | Copyright | Excerpt | Back Cover
Search inside this book:

What Other Items Do Customers Buy After Viewing This Item?


Customer Reviews

4 star
0
3 star
0
2 star
0
1 star
0
5.0 out of 5 stars
5.0 out of 5 stars
Most helpful customer reviews
3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
Format:Hardcover
Billed as a master of "Cuban noir," Jose Latour presents a dark novel of gambling, the American mob, and violence in Havana in 1958, during the presidency of Fulgencio Batista, a friend of mob boss Meyer Lansky. Lansky is deeply involved with the Casino at the Capri Hotel, having made deals with many of the employees, inspectors, and supervisors. Now, during the World Series between the New York Yankees and the Milwaukee Braves, he also expects to rake in hundreds of thousands of dollars in bets on the games. A motley group of locals, working for Elias Naguib, a businessman with ties to New York mob boss Joe Bonanno, has been planning a "fool-proof" robbery of Lansky's take, but ironically, the death of Pope Pius XII and the early closing of the casinos "out of respect" on the last night of the World Series changes the timing of the heist, and a bloody mess results.

Tawdry Havana with all its neon tackiness and grubby glamour comes alive here. Corrupt politicians, paid-off police, and mobsters control businesses ranging from prostitution and abortion to the international sugar, jewelry, gaming, and spare auto parts industries. Massive collusion leaves the average citizen powerless to control his own destiny, as Latour recreates the atmosphere which propels Fidel Castro to power a few months after the novel concludes. By alternating Lansky's activities with the play-by-play of each of the six World Series games, the author creates a sense of credibility and realism, and as the bodies pile up, the internecine rivalry among New York mob families adds external complications to the complex internal struggles for influence in Havana.
Read more ›
Was this review helpful to you?
Most Helpful Customer Reviews on Amazon.com (beta)
Amazon.com: 4.7 out of 5 stars  6 reviews
5 of 5 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars "We're making a bundle. It's too good to be true..." Jan. 31 2004
By Mary Whipple - Published on Amazon.com
Format:Hardcover
Billed as a master of "Cuban noir," Jose Latour presents a dark novel of gambling, the American mob, and violence in Havana in 1958, during the presidency of Fulgencio Batista, a friend of mob boss Meyer Lansky. Lansky is deeply involved with the Casino at the Capri Hotel, having made deals with many of the employees, inspectors, and supervisors. Now, during the World Series between the New York Yankees and the Milwaukee Braves, he also expects to rake in hundreds of thousands of dollars in bets on the games. A motley group of locals, working for Elias Naguib, a businessman with ties to New York mob boss Joe Bonanno, has been planning a "fool-proof" robbery of Lansky's take, but ironically, the death of Pope Pius XII and the early closing of the casinos "out of respect" on the last night of the World Series changes the timing of the heist, and a bloody mess results.

Tawdry Havana with all its neon tackiness and grubby glamour comes alive here. Corrupt politicians, paid-off police, and mobsters control businesses ranging from prostitution and abortion to the international sugar, jewelry, gaming, and spare auto parts industries. Massive collusion leaves the average citizen powerless to control his own destiny, as Latour recreates the atmosphere which propels Fidel Castro to power a few months after the novel concludes. By alternating Lansky's activities with the play-by-play of each of the six World Series games, the author creates a sense of credibility and realism, and as the bodies pile up, the internecine rivalry among New York mob families adds external complications to the complex internal struggles for influence in Havana.
Latour is an extremely precise, controlled writer who has plotted his novel to the last microdetail, leaving no loose ends, and the novel moves along smartly, despite its complexity. Developing drama and suspense through his careful selection of details and his ability to create a milieu by amassing specifics and piling them upon each other, he allows himself no forays into romantic description or heart-tugging literary pictures. What you "see" here of Havana appears to be presented with almost journalistic impartiality. Complex and exciting in its plotting and fully detailed in its depiction of 1958 Havana, this is a fine novel, bold and masculine in its presentation and full of the violence and uncertainty which presaged Castro's arrival into Havana. Mary Whipple
1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Cuban Caper Novel Aug. 26 2004
By Suzanne Epstein - Published on Amazon.com
Format:Hardcover
In the early 1950's, Cuban President Fulgencio Batista, in an attempt to bolster Cuban economy and draw American tourists, invited successful crime bosses to upgrade and oversee the gambling operations in Havana. Meyer Lansky was able to oversee construction and development of several major hotel/casinos and had a friendly working relationship with the government. This book takes place in 1958, just as the World Series between the Yankees and the Milwaukee Braves, is beginning. Betting on the outcome is in full swing, and we meet a gang of small-time Cuban ex-cons who are planning a heist of the take from the Capri Casino, one of Lansky's operations.

The first part of the book details the careful set-up and execution of the robbery. Of course, a couple of things go wrong, and follow-up plans undergo a huge revision. The rest of the book describes the efforts of the local police, the mob, and the thieves to straighten out the mess and escape with some dignity intact. This is ironic, since there is not a single honest character in the entire story.

I found this book to be quite entertaining. Although the book contains some detailed baseball play-by-plays, you don't need to be a baseball fan to follow the action. The real story occurs around this event. It would have been helpful to have a "cast of characters" list in the book. Many of the men have nicknames, and it was a bit confusing to keep them straight. But the time period and setting seemed authentic, including the rumble of revolution in the background. The reader has an advantage over the characters, because we know what happened in Cuba a short time later. The author uses real mob bosses such as Joe Bonanno and Joseph Profaci, in addition to Lansky to lend authenticity to the story (which is completely fictional). As in most "caper" novels, the reader tends to root for the crooks, even knowing they are acting outside of the law. I suppose that's what makes them so much fun. This book does not disappoint, and the conclusion seems satisfying for all involved.
1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A classic crime novel Aug. 3 2004
By S. Harris - Published on Amazon.com
Format:Hardcover|Verified Purchase
Jose Latour's new novel, "Havana World Series," tells the story of a gang of Cuban toughs who knock off Meyer Lansky's Casino de Capri. As background for the heist: the 1958 World Series, playing everywhere on radios and tv, while plots are perfected. And in the hills Castro gets closer and closer. This is fascinating stuff, and in many ways serves as a satisfying expansion on the "Cuban" parts of Godfather II.

Latour knows the people, and the times. Dialogue and description blend seamlessly and accurately in prose that is Hemingwayesque in its leaness and precision. Historical figures, such as Lansky and Joe Bonanno, are believably lethal. Fictional characters, such as ringleader Mariano "Ox" Contreras, are just as believable (and lethal). Cuba was a tough place in 1958, where money and death could be made or found, depending on the breaks and maybe your brains. Honor, deception, sex, violence, baseball, torture, and revolution, it's all here. Good general comparisons (dialogue, description, intricate plotting) could probably be found in George Higgins' "The Friends of Eddie Coyle," or his "Outlaws." That said, "Havana World Series" nevertheless stakes out its own impressive turf in the upper reaches of crime fiction, and on its own terms. A classic.
5.0 out of 5 stars One of the best novels I've read in years Feb. 23 2012
By jazznut - Published on Amazon.com
Format:Hardcover
The Cuban-born Latour writes better in his second language of English than most other writers for whom English is their first and only tongue. This suspenseful, spellbinding novel is set in Havana in the Fall of 1958, when the Yankees-Braves World Series was under way, and centers around the planning and attempted execution of a heist of money from the safe of a casino run by Meyer Lansky. Lansky and other real-life mobsters are characters, as are various hoodlums and police officials. The Revolution is brewing as well, of course. This is an intelligent, flawlessly written work that comes along only too rarely. Buy it and savor it.
5.0 out of 5 stars Excellent! Sept. 12 2011
By C. Chase - Published on Amazon.com
Format:Hardcover|Verified Purchase
Great book, wonderful story that gives us great insight into that mysterious place, Cuba! This writer is one of my favorates....I wish I could find more of his books in English.
Search Customer Reviews
Only search this product's reviews

Look for similar items by category


Feedback