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Hawks & Doves Enhanced, Original recording remastered


Price: CDN$ 9.10 & FREE Shipping on orders over CDN$ 25. Details
Only 2 left in stock (more on the way).
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32 new from CDN$ 3.89 8 used from CDN$ 8.35 1 collectible from CDN$ 155.22

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Hawks & Doves + Re-ac-tor + Long May You Run
Price For All Three: CDN$ 32.04


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Product Details

  • Audio CD (Aug. 19 2003)
  • Number of Discs: 1
  • Format: Enhanced, Original recording remastered
  • Label: Reprise
  • ASIN: B00009P1O3
  • Other Editions: Audio CD  |  LP Record
  • Average Customer Review: 3.7 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (19 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: #15,112 in Music (See Top 100 in Music)

1. Little Wing
2. The Old Homestead
3. Lost In Space
4. Captain Kennedy
5. Stayin' Power
6. Coastline
7. Union Man
8. Comin' Apart At Every Nail
9. Hawks & Doves

Product Description

Typically, Neil followed up his raucous Rust Never Sleeps triumph with an abrupt left turn, releasing this low-key acoustic album in 1980.

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Customer Reviews

3.7 out of 5 stars
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Most helpful customer reviews

3 of 3 people found the following review helpful By matthew j. armstrong on Aug. 21 2003
Format: Audio CD
Hard to believe that this is the follow-up to the all-time classic "Rust Never Sleeps", but once again Neil confounded everyone with yet another bizarre release ala "American Stars & Bars". Like that album and "Rust" we have two stylistically different sides. Side one, tracks 1-4, consisted of material written and, in some cases, even recorded in '74-'75 and is the more interesting batch of songs. 'Little Wing' is a slight acoustic number w/ shimmering harmonica. 'Old Homestead' is a brilliant and oblique number that recalls classic acoustic Neil travelogues like 'Thrasher' & 'Ambulance Blues'. 'Lost in Space' is the weirdest one on the album, but may be the best. With its underwater sounding guitar, bizarre lyrics, and even children singing at one point, makes this one of the most enjoyable pieces in the Young cannon. 'Captain Kennedy' is a solo Neil story song. The second side, tracks 5-9, was played by a one-off country band assembled by long time Young compatriot, Ben Keith. The hokey honky-tonk songs about family, the working man, and good ol' USA, fit together very nicely but just aren't very strong songs. People must have thought he was crazy singing these just a year after screaming 'Rock and Roll can never die!' on "Rust". One would think the album would be better if he stuck with one style , however, no one knew at the time about the situation with his severely handicapped son which limited his time to write songs and record. Neil would only play one show in 1980 at the Bread & Roses festival...the lone show in a nearly four year period of live inactivity. Worth having in the collection if only for the first four songs.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Dominick Grace on Nov. 22 2010
Format: Audio CD
As the follow-up to Rust Never Sleeps, Hawks and Doves almost had to suffer by comparison, but I've always been surprised by how little love this album seems to get. Yes, it's short, clocking in at only half an hour or so. Yes, some of the songs are slight ("Stayin' Power" is a nice little love song but nothing special, for instance), but song for song, it compares favourably with most of Neil's albums. From the brief, haunting "Little Wing" that opens side one on, Young offers up a surreal and sardonic mix. Most of side one is taken up with more or less acoustic numbers, chock full of odd non-sequiturs and bizarre images, not to mention interesting if subtle commentaries. Listen to the lyrics of "Captain Kennedy," for instance, or "The Old Homestead," songs that are historically rooted and timeless at the same time. Side two shifts gears somewhat, offering a sequence of countrified hoedowns that superficially sound a lot alike--you might find once or twice that you think the song you just finished listening to is starting up again ("They all sound the same!" shouts a presumably disgruntled fan at the beginning of the live Year of the Horse set; "It's all one song!" Neil answers, which is really true of his work in a fundamental way.) But Young's using familiar country sounds to turn sideways or upside-down typical country paradigms--the working man song turned into a humorous comment on the AFM in "Union Man," or patriotism transcended in the final two numbers, "Comin' Apart at Every Nail," and "Hawks and Doves," which (the latter especially) some apparently hear as jingoistic pro-Americanism. Seriously, listen carefully to these songs. They're not anti-American by any stretch, but they're hardly thoughtless country paens to "my country, love it or leave it," either.Read more ›
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Philip J. Mayer on Oct. 4 2003
Format: Audio CD
Released in 1980, this album ended up under the radar, and from the sounds of it, a lot of Neil Young fans have tried to disown it altogether. Too bad, because Hawks and Doves is a great listen.
The first half is mostly acoustic with sparse backup which suits the songs perfectly. Little Wing is simple and evocative. It could have been an outtake from After The Gold Rush. The Old Homestead is weird and wonderful, full of extended metaphors that Neil really uses masterfully. Lost In Space is Neil at his most playful. It has some very nice guitar work, and the Marine Munchkins are great. Captain Kennedy is like an unplugged version of Powderfinger, which is to say, one of his very best.
The second half is all countrified, with a little rock and roll thrown into the mix. Not as sloppy as the stuff on American Stars and Bars, and not as forced as Old Ways. Both Staying Power and Coastline are straight forward examinations of Neil's newly found domestic bliss (he was recently married to his current wife). Not his best work, but pleasantly upbeat. Union Man is an absolute riot. I would give all I own to hear this one live.
The last two songs are where I think a lot of Neil Young fans lose interst. Both are terrific songs but signal a definite shift in Neil's politics. While Coming Apart At Every Nails at least shows some moderation, Hawks and Doves is a full bore patriotic stomper. If you want to box Neil in as the political gadfly he may have been in 1970, you might be a little shocked (but then again, that's what you get for wanting to box Neil in). If you're OK with it, you're in for a great ride.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Dasspunk on Sept. 7 2003
Format: Audio CD
You can not become an elitist Neil Young fan until you can say, with complete conviction, "Hawks & Doves is my favorite Neil Young album".
This album is fantastic but an acquired taste. On the first side you get Captain Kenedy, which is possibly the greatest sea shanty ever written. The second side is basically one long song and judging from the other reviewers, misunderstood. They clearly have forgotten that live music truly is better and that bumper stickers should indeed be issued.
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