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Hawks and Owls of the Great Lakes Region and Eastern North America Paperback – Mar 6 2004


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Product Details

  • Paperback: 128 pages
  • Publisher: Firefly Books (March 6 2004)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1552978478
  • ISBN-13: 978-1552978474
  • Product Dimensions: 0.9 x 13.9 x 21.4 cm
  • Shipping Weight: 304 g
  • Average Customer Review: 4.5 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (2 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: #281,859 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)
  • See Complete Table of Contents


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First Sentence
THE BLACK VULTURE IS FOUND from the southeastern U.S. all the way through Mexico and most of Central and South America. Read the first page
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Front Cover | Copyright | Table of Contents | Excerpt | Index | Back Cover
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful By Matthew R. Mullenix on July 8 2004
Format: Paperback
A lingering perk: Some publishers still have my name listed as editor of the NAFA Hawk Chalk. Evidently Firefly Books is one, and I'm thankful for that. Some very good natural history and reference titles are available from this company, and they recently sent me one for review.
Chris G. Earley (the Canadian biologist who produced similar regional guides to sparrows & finches, and warblers; both titles with Firefly) makes an excellent addition to the growing list of photographic guides to North American raptors. There are some heavy hitters in this field already (e.g., Clark and Wheeler's 1995 guide and subsequent editions), which raise the bar for any newcomers. But Earley's concise volume is well constructed and worth adding to any falconer or birder's library.
Earley presents the raptors (diurnals first, then the owls) in their basic taxonomic groups or genera. He opens with a brief discussion of the guide's conventions (size comparisons, the standard icons he uses for quick reference, etc.) and good, basic advice for hawk watchers (to wit: watch the hawk first, as long as you can, then look it up). He completes his introduction with diagrams of avian anatomy as they relate to field identification, adding notes on common "hawk look-alikes" and a chart for best raptor viewing by season and species.
The following species accounts are brief, each covering two to four pages with large, well-composed color photos illustrating. A short note on natural history is typically accompanied by viewing and ID tips (some include literary quotes), and capped with the book's standardized set of icons and field notes. The author's selection of images is especially helpful, with color morphs and age-appropriate plumages displayed in easy-to-compare views.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Island Girl on July 9 2010
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
Hawks and Owls is a wonderful book. It has numerous photos that are of excellent quality. There are numerous photos of each type of bird showing the bird at rest, in flight, and at different stages of its life. I have numerous bird books, and this is the best one that I have used to help me identify which type of birds that I have been seeing. Another good aspect of this book is that there is a range map included on each bird on the same page where the bird write up is. I was so impressed, that I bought four other books on birds that were written by Chris Earley.
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Most Helpful Customer Reviews on Amazon.com (beta)

Amazon.com: 8 reviews
15 of 15 people found the following review helpful
A Welcome Addition to a Crowded Field July 8 2004
By Matthew R. Mullenix - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Paperback
A lingering perk: Some publishers still have my name listed as editor of the NAFA Hawk Chalk. Evidently Firefly Books is one, and I'm thankful for that. Some very good natural history and reference titles are available from this company, and they recently sent me one for review.
Chris G. Earley (the Canadian biologist who produced similar regional guides to sparrows & finches, and warblers; both titles with Firefly) makes an excellent addition to the growing list of photographic guides to North American raptors. There are some heavy hitters in this field already (e.g., Clark and Wheeler's 1995 guide and subsequent editions), which raise the bar for any newcomers. But Earley's concise volume is well constructed and worth adding to any falconer or birder's library.
Earley presents the raptors (diurnals first, then the owls) in their basic taxonomic groups or genera. He opens with a brief discussion of the guide's conventions (size comparisons, the standard icons he uses for quick reference, etc.) and good, basic advice for hawk watchers (to wit: watch the hawk first, as long as you can, then look it up). He completes his introduction with diagrams of avian anatomy as they relate to field identification, adding notes on common "hawk look-alikes" and a chart for best raptor viewing by season and species.
The following species accounts are brief, each covering two to four pages with large, well-composed color photos illustrating. A short note on natural history is typically accompanied by viewing and ID tips (some include literary quotes), and capped with the book's standardized set of icons and field notes. The author's selection of images is especially helpful, with color morphs and age-appropriate plumages displayed in easy-to-compare views. It is noteworthy that unlike some of the less qualified sources of raptor photo ID (especially those on the Web), the Cooper's hawks shown herein are actually Cooper's hawks; the Sharp-shins actually Sharp-shins. One particularly fine image (by Brian Wheeler) shows an adult male and female Cooper's standing together and dramatically captures their size dimorphism.
Earley closes this small volume with notes on how the public may help and observe raptors in their area, some suggested reading and a very helpful photographic "summing up" of included species that allows, via a series of charts, direct comparisons of similar species: the accipiters to each other, buteos to other buteos, and so on, which saves the reader the task of flipping pages to note the differences. Of course, I happily flipped between the pages anyway.
4 of 4 people found the following review helpful
Excellent Guide for the Beginner March 15 2005
By K Scheffler - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Paperback
Birds of prey are regarded with particular fascination by many birders, but their identification presents a number of problems that can daunt the beginner. Hawks & Owls of the Great Lakes Region and Eastern North America, therefore, is an excellent introductory guide.

Each species has between two to four pages devotes to it. The majority of this space consists of photographs, depicting the species in flight and perched; save for a few, the photographs are crisp and clear. Aside from the brief introductory note and the more brief "nature notes," text is devoted to pointing out key features of the given species. Size, characteristics while perched and in flight, differences between males, females and juveniles, flight traits, and distinguishing calls are dealt with for each species, while relevant information concerning morphs and second year plummage, etc. is included when applicable.

Overall, I'm very impressed by this guide and highly recommend it to the beginning birder.
3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
Not only for beginners. Sept. 17 2005
By S. Kral - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Paperback
The excellent quality of this field guide matches others by Chris Earley. Being able to study the large, clear, color closeups of these species will enhance your identification skills. Seasonal range maps, special notations, calls and sounds made, plus additional comparison charts in the back make this another must have. It's lightweight, easy to carry and worth adding to your collection of field guides!
1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
Exactly what I was looking for Jan. 12 2011
By Jacob Aicholtz - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
If you like to identify raptors as I do, this book is perfect. Other books have pictures separate from the bird information, this book keeps everything in order as it should be. The book is concise enough to be small, but still very informative.
exactly Aug. 26 2013
By Chas. M. Humphrey - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
This book was exactly what we wanted, and has seen a great deal of use. Had I known it existed, I would have purchased it long ago.

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