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Healing The Soul In The Age Of The Brain Paperback – Aug 27 2002


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Product Details

  • Paperback: 464 pages
  • Publisher: Penguin Paperbacks; 1 edition (Aug. 27 2002)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0140254897
  • ISBN-13: 978-0140254891
  • Product Dimensions: 2.8 x 13.3 x 21 cm
  • Shipping Weight: 590 g
  • Average Customer Review: 4.3 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (3 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: #400,506 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)


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Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
Elio Frattaroli is a man if intellect and integrity. His book is academically challenging while being spiritually enriching. In the tradition of M. Scott Peck and William Glasser, Elio challenges us to face life straight on without numbing ourselves with mind altering pharmaceuticals. I found his metaphor of life as a swimming pool or a quest a call to action in my life. Elio does not hand us ten easy steps to Nirvana. Instead he challenges those in the helping professions to assist people in learning life's lessons through the challenges that life brings. This is not light reading but for anyone who desires to live life on purpose a must read.
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Format: Paperback
I had been immersed in the psychoanalytic process for over three years when I came across this book. Having experienced, first hand, the soulful aspects of analysis, both pleasant and painful, I connected instantly to Dr. Frattaroli's accounts of his work with patients. I am convinced that the only sane and solid path to emotional well being is the long, introspective one described so eloquently in this book. If you have ever considered beginning psychoanalysis (or you are simply interested in learning more about what it means to be fully human) then I strongly recommend that you read this book.
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By A Customer on March 5 2003
Format: Paperback
THis book was obviously written by a great Freudian analyst. It is very thought-provoking, and worth the read, especially if you are in analysis or some form of talk-therapy. Frattaroli makes several important points about the importance of talk therapy, and giving up some of the medications to get the work done - no matter how difficult the journey.
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Most Helpful Customer Reviews on Amazon.com (beta)

Amazon.com: 5 reviews
5 of 5 people found the following review helpful
A Wonderful Companion to the Psychoanalytic Process May 27 2003
By John - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Paperback
I had been immersed in the psychoanalytic process for over three years when I came across this book. Having experienced, first hand, the soulful aspects of analysis, both pleasant and painful, I connected instantly to Dr. Frattaroli's accounts of his work with patients. I am convinced that the only sane and solid path to emotional well being is the long, introspective one described so eloquently in this book. If you have ever considered beginning psychoanalysis (or you are simply interested in learning more about what it means to be fully human) then I strongly recommend that you read this book.
7 of 8 people found the following review helpful
a great read March 5 2003
By A Customer - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Paperback
THis book was obviously written by a great Freudian analyst. It is very thought-provoking, and worth the read, especially if you are in analysis or some form of talk-therapy. Frattaroli makes several important points about the importance of talk therapy, and giving up some of the medications to get the work done - no matter how difficult the journey.
2 of 3 people found the following review helpful
the inherent duality of existence from a psychodynamic perspective March 1 2011
By Omar Azam - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Paperback
A really mind-opening book (quite an accomplishment for a psychological theorist).
I read the first half of it and was sufficiently blown away that I had to pause. Also,
the remainder is heavy on the case study and a psychdynamic case study which is a
little bit indulgent. However, the author has a very original and powerful theoretical
framework which inquiring minds should examine. I liked the opening chapters a lot
regarding the philosophy of science and the inherent duality of existence.

I was awakened to the undeniable existence of the subjective after
reading these chapters. As long as there is an "I", the I's interpretation of
reality is all that really matters to that individual, in the way one speaks
of Descartes epiphany. In the end, when you throw away everything you have
ever learned, all that is really cogent and true is that which is
subjective.

As a matter of fact, this book helped inspire the title of my
poetry website, Subjective Substance.

I really liked the concrete examples that challenged modern brain science.
It really seems that brain scientists are involved in trying to map
responses to brain manipulation to subjective states. For example, their
logic goes, "If we can find that manipulating this region of the brain leads
to the person seeing red, then we can conclude that we can assume that this
part of the brain maps to the color red for all people all the time."

A few of my thoughts on this:

A fundamental problem with this logic is that they are trying to correlate a
subjective state based on an objective manipulation and then throw away the
utility of the subjective report.

If we look at this from an experimental perspective, what they are trying to
do is perform a regression of subjective state on objective manipulation.
The predictor variable is the physical manipulation and the outcome variable
is the subjective state. One problem is that they are still relying on the
subjective report of the patient as the outcome variable! They are still
bound to consider the subjective state as they go about trying to equate
objective with subjective. Now, as long as the relationship between the
manipulation and the subjective state is 100% consistent within that subject
and between all subjects, they are correct in their unification theory. But
otherwise, this correlation is really spurious, because the subjective state
really is the litmus test.

My comment on the book, in my opinion, furthers the ammunition against the
attempt to throw away subjective report as the important thing.
Five Stars May 28 2013
By ofveracity - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Paperback
Terrific.
Brilliantly composed! Sept. 3 2008
By Int'l Trade And Corp - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Paperback
This is a wonderful exploration of psychiatry and the human condition examined through humanistic and philosophic lenses. Thoroughly challenging, delightful, and poignant. Re-readable for years. Highly recommended.

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