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Hear It Is


Price: CDN$ 15.94 & FREE Shipping on orders over CDN$ 25. Details
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Product Details

  • Audio CD (Jan. 14 2008)
  • Number of Discs: 1
  • Label: Restless Records
  • ASIN: B000003BFM
  • Other Editions: Audio CD  |  LP Record
  • Average Customer Review: 3.2 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (4 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: #27,604 in Music (See Top 100 in Music)

1. With You
2. Unplugged
3. Trains, Brains & Rain
4. Jesus Shootin' Heroin
5. Just Like Before
6. She Is Death
7. Chalie Manson Blues
8. Man From Pakistan
9. Godzilla Flickn
10. Staring At Sound/With You (Reprise)
11. Summertime Blues

Product Description

Customer Reviews

3.2 out of 5 stars
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Most helpful customer reviews

Format: Audio CD
Timing is everything, and the Flaming Lips debut album is a perfect validation of that statement. The Lips self-released eponymous EP paved the way for their signing to indie label Restless in the mid-'80's, a time when bands like the Replacements and Sonic Youth were just making their dent in what was to become "alternative" rock. Back then, it was just "college rock," and the Lips couldn't have stumbled into a better category. Their indefinable sound was a melange of psychedelia and self-effacing acid rock, often gaining them the unfair categorization as such. This is one heck of a sloppy record, but sincerity oozes from every track. Their cartoonish weirdness, evident on tracks such as "Trains, Brains & Rain" and "Staring At Sound" is offset by the underlying lyrical seriousness of "She Is Death" and "Godzilla Flick," hinting at a darker underside to this over-the-top band. Beneath their wall of noise and screwball guitar antics, the Lips had something to say; they don't quite get it out on this record (they really don't until much later on "In A Priest Driven Ambulance"), but these are the first steps in the right direction. Well worth a listen.
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Format: Audio CD
I just wanted to take this moment to review "Here it is" post release of Yoshimi, hoping of course that some of the new fans this album, which I consequently think it great, will take some time to listen to a bit of the history. The music on "Here it is" is, although probably not the best, a great start to the Flaming Lip's career. No matter how many times I hear this album, it still can give me chills. From the dark humor in the first track, "With You," to the get out of your seat rock of "Planes, Trains, and Brains" and "Charlie Manson Blues," not forgetting the utterly bizzare religious statement of "Jesus Shootin' Heroin," there is absolutely no way that this album will not keep interested until the very end. This is a great way to remember how music was while Michael Irvins still had "the hair."
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Format: Audio CD
After the Lips released an unimpressive EP in 1985, they made a very wise choice and let Wayne Coyne take over as lead vocalist, and let his drug-addict brother Mark step down. Their 1986 debut album, "Hear It Is", is nowhere near the hard rockin' trippiness of their later work, but still worth a listen. It's much darker than their follow-ups, especially on such songs as "Godzilla Flick" (a really sad song about Mark's near-fatal battle with drugs). There is slight signs of the Lips' trademark goofiness, in "Charlie Manson Blues" and "Trains, Brains And Rain".
Overall, nothing to warp your mind, but still worth getting, for historical reasons, and a must for any diehard Lips fan such as myself. And check out the album cover: gotta love Wayne's Julius Erving afro. He sure looks angry, too...
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By A Customer on March 6 2004
Format: Audio CD
Let me first say, the lips are incredibly innovative and interesting to listen to, but this album doesn't live up to others at all. It's just fairly boring "punk rawk". So if you're going to buy a lips cd, buy any other one (they're all incredible), but skip "hear it is".
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Most Helpful Customer Reviews on Amazon.com (beta)

Amazon.com: 6 reviews
10 of 11 people found the following review helpful
Psychedelic, or nascent genius? April 24 1999
By caparo@email.unc.edu - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Audio CD
Timing is everything, and the Flaming Lips debut album is a perfect validation of that statement. The Lips self-released eponymous EP paved the way for their signing to indie label Restless in the mid-'80's, a time when bands like the Replacements and Sonic Youth were just making their dent in what was to become "alternative" rock. Back then, it was just "college rock," and the Lips couldn't have stumbled into a better category. Their indefinable sound was a melange of psychedelia and self-effacing acid rock, often gaining them the unfair categorization as such. This is one heck of a sloppy record, but sincerity oozes from every track. Their cartoonish weirdness, evident on tracks such as "Trains, Brains & Rain" and "Staring At Sound" is offset by the underlying lyrical seriousness of "She Is Death" and "Godzilla Flick," hinting at a darker underside to this over-the-top band. Beneath their wall of noise and screwball guitar antics, the Lips had something to say; they don't quite get it out on this record (they really don't until much later on "In A Priest Driven Ambulance"), but these are the first steps in the right direction. Well worth a listen.
2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
Nascent but not bad, especially "With You" June 1 2008
By Andrew Jensen - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Audio CD
At this point the Flaming Lips were just your basic loud amateur rock band, but with occasional signs of real songwriting ability. The thing opens with "With You," a pretty little ditty that shows that right from the get-go Wayne had a decent ear for melody and knew how to get loud and quiet and then loud again. I think "Trains, Brains and Rain" is a mockery of folkie seriousness and nostalgia, but even if that's not what it's about it is a catchy little tune. And of course there's "Jesus Shootin' Heroin," probably the most well-known song on this debut LP. By pairing a good and extremely simple riff with eerie wails and then alternating that with Wayne speak-singing some vaguely anti-religious lyrics that don't make much sense over some chanting backing vocals, the Flaming Lips came up with something here that doesn't sound like any other song I've ever heard. That doesn't make it great, but it does make it memorable, and it's worth hearing if you've got any kind of interest in these guys. I'd be very surprised to see them do any of this stuff live, but this album's worth hearing if you like any of their other pre-Transmissions stuff.

Song by song:

1 With You ***
2 Unplugged **
3 Trains, Brains & Rain ***
4 Jesus Shootin' Heroin ***
5 Just Like Before **
6 She Is Death **
7 Charlie Manson Blues ***
8 Man from Pakistan ***
9 Godzilla Flick **
10 Staring at Sound / With You (Reprise) ***
6 of 8 people found the following review helpful
the Lips say "Yo, we're here." April 20 2002
By Scuzzbopper - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Audio CD
After the Lips released an unimpressive EP in 1985, they made a very wise choice and let Wayne Coyne take over as lead vocalist, and let his drug-addict brother Mark step down. Their 1986 debut album, "Hear It Is", is nowhere near the hard rockin' trippiness of their later work, but still worth a listen. It's much darker than their follow-ups, especially on such songs as "Godzilla Flick" (a really sad song about Mark's near-fatal battle with drugs). There is slight signs of the Lips' trademark goofiness, in "Charlie Manson Blues" and "Trains, Brains And Rain".
Overall, nothing to warp your mind, but still worth getting, for historical reasons, and a must for any diehard Lips fan such as myself. And check out the album cover: gotta love Wayne's Julius Erving afro. He sure looks angry, too...
1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
Not The Best Debut Out There, But They're Trying Like Hell. Aug. 27 2007
By DominEl - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Audio CD
The Flaming Lips didn't always have members who knew how to play their instruments. At this point in their history, The Lips hardly knew what they were doing, but they practiced and practiced until they got enough songs together to record an album. This isn't my favorite music, by The Flaming Lips or anybody else, but it's a start... And a damn fine one, at that. After an almost unnoticed EP, this underground gem kicked off their careers with a hefty punch in the gut. It's sometimes hard to listen to, but their ambitions just make you respect them so much more.

But that doesn't mean all of it's bad. No, no, no. Some of this is great stuff. "With You" starts off very quietly, with some nice little noodling and a very simple melody with very basic lyrics... But the chorus climaxes with wailing guitars (And it doesn't matter that they don't know how to play, because the feedback just makes it sound good!) and gives the song some diversity.

After the song makes its quiet exit, the next song starts off very suddenly with a catchy punk/garage riff. Come to think of it, this whole album kind of sounds like a sixties' tribute with some sonic punk noise pulling it through the eighties. The third track has to be my favorite by far, though. Very catchy, and has jangly guitars accompanying the searing (once again, punky) electric guitar. In fact, the jangly acoustic could be considered a heavily played folk tune...

Although, after "Jesus Shootin' Heroin", there is not much more diversity on this album, except for "Godzilla Flick", which is a pretty, but a little bit bland, acoustic ditty. "Jesus Shootin' Heroin" is quite the pretentious, but with good reason, seven-minute religion-questioning rocker, which really could have used some time shaven off. So this is where The Flaming Lips start showing their artistic talent by making some good songs along with a few mediocre without really knowing what they're doing. They've found ways to cover up the fact that they're still learning by playing quickly or pasting distortion all over the place. The Flaming Lips only go up from here, but this is a promising start.
2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
Punk Rawk Jan. 18 2012
By The Gizzard - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Audio CD
This album is pure punk rawk. Those of us that were around when this was released became fans of this record right away.
This in no way compares to the sugar-coated stuff the masses are buying up, simply put...it's better.


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