CDN$ 14.78
FREE Shipping on orders over CDN$ 25.
Usually ships within 1 to 2 months.
Ships from and sold by Amazon.ca.
Gift-wrap available.
Quantity:1
Have one to sell?
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See this image

Hell Paperback – Mar 1 1995


See all 3 formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Amazon Price New from Used from
Hardcover
"Please retry"
CDN$ 11.50
Paperback
"Please retry"
CDN$ 14.78
CDN$ 12.13 CDN$ 7.90

Best Books of 2014
Unruly Places, Alastair Bonnett’s tour of the world’s most unlikely micro-nations, moving villages, secret cities, and no man’s lands, is our #1 pick for 2014. See all

Customers Who Bought This Item Also Bought



Product Details

  • Paperback: 255 pages
  • Publisher: Turtle Point Pr; New edition edition (March 1 1995)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1885983018
  • ISBN-13: 978-1885983015
  • Product Dimensions: 14 x 1.7 x 20.3 cm
  • Shipping Weight: 340 g
  • Average Customer Review: 5.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (2 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: #679,897 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Customer Reviews

5.0 out of 5 stars
5 star
2
4 star
0
3 star
0
2 star
0
1 star
0
See both customer reviews
Share your thoughts with other customers

Most helpful customer reviews

1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Luc REYNAERT on Nov. 5 2002
Format: Paperback
Although sometimes considered as an erotic work, this is in fact a philosophical novel about solipsism.
This theme is treated brilliantly: a man looks through a hole in a wall in a hotel room into another room, where he observes scenes about life and death, like sex or a dying person who insults a priest.
He always asks himself: is this real or are these scenes only in my thoughts? Does the world outside me exist? His answer is negative: I am alone.
It brings him on the brink of schizophrenia. Even science cannot help him. But ultimately he chooses to continue to live, because there is still a sparkle of hope. To find out why, you should read this novel.
An ambitious, not always well understood, but brilliant work about an essential philosophical problem.
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again.
By Daffy Bibliophile TOP 500 REVIEWER on July 24 2011
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
First of all, what this book is not: this book is not voyeurism, if that's what you're looking for, look elsewhere. So what is this book? This book is an examination of human nature. But it's not a dry, pedantic examination, it's a look at human nature in all of its beauty and all of its unseemliness. The lust, the love, the suffering, the solitude is all in that room into which Henri Barbusse has allowed us to look. Barbusse shows us that we live in a world of pretension, a world in which we all strive to create a superficial image, a plastic persona, in order to impress our fellow human beings, a world of ego and lies.

The protagonist of this novel finds a hole in the wall above a blocked off doorway in his hotel room, a hole which allows him to observe the occupants of the other room without their knowledge. What he sees - birth, death, young love, forbidden love, adultery - shows him what human nature is without the affectations of society. What he sees is Humanity stripped bare. He'll never see society the same way again and neither will you after reading this book. Forget about going down the rabbit hole, just take a peak through Barbusse's hole in the wall.
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again.

Most Helpful Customer Reviews on Amazon.com (beta)

Amazon.com: 14 reviews
44 of 45 people found the following review helpful
Solipsism. Nov. 5 2002
By Luc REYNAERT - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Paperback
Although sometimes considered as an erotic work, this is in fact a philosophical novel about solipsism.
This theme is treated brilliantly: a man looks through a hole in a wall in a hotel room into another room, where he observes scenes about life and death, like sex or a dying person who insults a priest.
He always asks himself: is this real or are these scenes only in my thoughts? Does the world outside me exist? His answer is negative: I am alone.
It brings him on the brink of schizophrenia. Even science cannot help him. But ultimately he chooses to continue to live, because there is still a sparkle of hope. To find out why, you should read this novel.
An ambitious, not always well understood, but brilliant work about an essential philosophical problem.
52 of 58 people found the following review helpful
One of a kind July 23 2004
By J from NY - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Paperback
It is hard to overestimate the power of this book. A young man (it is regrettable that we never get to put a name to the narrator) cuts a small hole in the wall of his room and watches life, quite literally, 'pass him by'. He bears witness to everything: false love, carnal desire, death (there is an unforgettable scene in which a volatile old man refuses to confess to a priest on his deathbed) all the while making biting observations which strip away, layer by layer, the lies we tell ourselves to keep living. As one reads one almost feels guilty, thinking to oneself "yes, I claimed to love and didn't really love in this situation, I behaved in this way, etc...." It is that true to life despite being a work of solipsism. This is a must.
6 of 6 people found the following review helpful
"There is no hell other than our mad longing to live" Oct. 3 2008
By Medusa - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Paperback
L'enfer or Hell is a philosophical novel dealing with solipsism and existentialism. The release of "Hell" in English started a burning scandal because of its depiction of voyeurism. The story revolves around a young man in a Paris boarding house peeking through a hole in his bedroom wall to witness love, death, adultery, and birth in the most graphic way.

The topic or the actions described are not the reason for the greatness of this work, rather it is the way this young man describes regular daily events
Endless unforgettable scenes like the helpless exposed position of a woman during childbirth, two doctors discussing a health condition of a dying man, a man discussing religion/God right before his death, two lovers trying to escape emptiness through desire and fantasy. The greatness of the scenes is not the act as much as Barbusse's language:

* "And I think about myself, about myself who can neither know myself well nor get rid of myself; about myself who am like a heavy shadow between my heart and the sun"

* "Nothing can prevail against the absolute statement that I exist and cannot emerge from my self"

* "What's the matter? Nothing is the matter. It's just me"

* "Humanity is the longing for novelty combined with the fear of death"

* "God is merely a ready-made reply to mystery and hope, and there is no other reason for the reality of God but our longing for it"

I don't usually include phrases of the work itself in my reviews, but I'm making an exception for readers like me, who might be fascinated by Barbusse's use of language.

Whether Barbusse intended to deal with existentialism or solipsism or simply the inner hell of a total cynic, he created an absolutely brilliant work; the likes of which has no equal.

Philosophical ideas fall in and out of fashion with time, but the way an idea is delivered, as exemplified by Barbusse, can have a significant impact on how that idea is initially received and how it lives on. Barbusse's Hell is a timeless, great work.
17 of 21 people found the following review helpful
My judgment on Hell Aug. 24 2006
By Sudo Mayhap - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Paperback
The dialogue is a bit trite. For example, you have 13 year old lovers each speaking like... well, like despairing 19th century romantics alone in the privacy of their bathrooms. Clearly Barbusse was no master of dialogue. There are some inconsistencies and absurdities (in the ridiculous, not "good", sense) in the plot. However, this is well compensated for by the vivid description of the smallest details; instead of such a thing boring the reader, you find yourself anticipating when Barbusse will next describe the evening light on a cabinet, the formation of furniture, the casual setting of a cafe, etc. This book truly reads like a magnificent painting. Despite the 3 star rating (for reasons above), I highly recommend it.
4 of 4 people found the following review helpful
Beyond Beauty, Beyond Words ... Breathless May 23 2008
By Cheryl Anne @ Twisted Knickers - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Paperback
A man in his empty room ... witnessing through a hole in the wall all that mankind has to offer of its soul.

And what of this witness? Life greatest mysteries, triumphs, and desperate measures spread out before him, what torture. His reward - understanding. His punishment - the knowledge that he might never have all of those life's moments for himself. If you had the choice, which would you choose - Knowledge or Life?

This book is a deep look into the hidden passions of mankind. A voyeuristic look, but are we all not voyeurs in some way ... as we read the gossip columns, as we watch the so-called reality TV, or even when we read a book, we are choosing to be a voyeur, immersing ourselves in a life not our own for no other purpose than to see how it measures up to the life we have chosen for ourselves, and maybe to gain some small shred of insight into our own souls. Think of the infinite possibilities, the reasons, the rationale ... what do those wall hide from view? What darkness does it smother?

Henri's witness knows the answers to those questions. His Hell: knowing the truth in the intimate lives of others, yet never actually living himself - never feeling worthy of living.

The language has depth, overflowing with romanticism. This gives us valuable insight into the desperation of our witness, how he longs to be part of the world and yet remains so detached from it.

I would recommend this book to anyone who appreciates a bit of narrative philosophy while gazing through the peephole.

Look for similar items by category


Feedback