Vous voulez voir cette page en franÁais ? Cliquez ici.


or
Sign in to turn on 1-Click ordering.
More Buying Choices
Have one to sell? Sell yours here

Hero [Import]

Tan Dun Audio CD
3.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (4 customer reviews)
Price: CDN$ 58.86 & FREE Shipping. Details
o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o
Temporarily out of stock.
Order now and we'll deliver when available. We'll e-mail you with an estimated delivery date as soon as we have more information. Your account will only be charged when we ship the item.
Ships from and sold by Amazon.ca. Gift-wrap available.
Join Amazon Student in Canada


Product Details


1. Hero : Overture
2. For the World: Theme Music
3. Warriors
4. Gone with Leaves
5. Longing
6. At Emperor's Palace
7. In the Chess Court
8. Love in Distance
9. Spirit Fight
10. Swift Sword
11. Farewell, Hero
12. Sorrow in Desert
13. Take Me Home
14. Above Water
15. Cnow
16. Yearning for the Peace
17. Hero [*] - Tan Dun,

Product Description

Product Description

Japanese pressing of the soundtrack to the hit 2004 film. Packaged in an original jacket. Sony.

Customer Reviews

Most helpful customer reviews
For those few fans who took the time to look deeper into what made Crouching Tiger, Hidden Dragon a good film, you may have learned the name Tan Dun. While others would seek his work, because of his contributions to Crouching, I know of those few, like myself, who have a deeper understanding of music, would seek this album, in hopes to expand the beautiful Composition that is Crouching Tiger, Hidden Dragon. This Review is for you.
While like myself had hoped, you would expect something awe inspiring and completely original out of Hero, when in fact this is not the case. To begin, Tan Dun chose another famous Soloist in hopes for success as he found on Crouching. Yo-Yo Ma who is incomparable was quite possibly the reason for the success of his first score, this time around, however, he chose Itzhak Perlman, a violinist who‚€™s works were made famous after his appearance on John Williams ‚€œSchindler‚€™s List.‚€� While on paper, this would sound amazing, Itzhak is very talented and makes the best of what he‚€™s given in the score, but ultimately Tan fails to deliver. His lack of diversity and range is really revealed in Hero, using slightly altered versions of his solo in Crouching performed by Yo in Cello to Itzhak in violin, to which by my opinion is degrading, I am a fan of the violin, but in this composition does not sound as pure and uplifting as the cello did in Crouching. Another fault, is consistency, Tan nearly flawlessly dispersed his cello solos throughout Crouching at nearly the perfect times, but in Hero the violin seems recycled and reused all to much, and while there is a ‚€œTheme solo‚€� to Crouching, it‚€™s not overbearing, where as in Hero it becomes uncomfortable and misplaced making this an almost unbearable album to listen to straight through.
Read more ›
Was this review helpful to you?
1.0 out of 5 stars ONE HERO April 4 2004
By A Customer
This score has only one Hero, the main cello theme for the whole movie. The rest of the score is mostly a constant rambling of music so simular to Tan Dun's Crouching Tiger I found it ruined the movie for me. The main cello theme is huanting and sad like the movie. The price of this disc is even sadder. Go for Crouching Tiger or The Last Samurai by Hans Zimmer.
Was this review helpful to you?
4.0 out of 5 stars Crouching Hero, Hidden Hero March 6 2004
By Banesto
It's similar to Crouching Tiger in way, but still have it's own temper and maner. The Cello is the main instrument on this score, so be ready to hear a LOT of it. I was annoyed of the cello during the movie, so it was hard in the way to hear the score from beginning to the end. You will need patience and specific mood - something like meditative or chillout.
Was this review helpful to you?
5.0 out of 5 stars Wonderful!!! July 14 2004
The movie and the music fit each other exellent!
Itzhak Perlman is amazing!
You will enjoy listening this music for a long time.
Was this review helpful to you?
Most Helpful Customer Reviews on Amazon.com (beta)
Amazon.com: 3.0 out of 5 stars  4 reviews
4 of 8 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Wonderful!!! July 14 2004
By Dominique - Published on Amazon.com
The movie and the music fit each other exellent!
Itzhak Perlman is amazing!
You will enjoy listening this music for a long time.
6 of 12 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Crouching Hero, Hidden Hero March 6 2004
By Banesto - Published on Amazon.com
It's similar to Crouching Tiger in way, but still have it's own temper and maner. The Cello is the main instrument on this score, so be ready to hear a LOT of it. I was annoyed of the cello during the movie, so it was hard in the way to hear the score from beginning to the end. You will need patience and specific mood - something like meditative or chillout.
7 of 16 people found the following review helpful
1.0 out of 5 stars ONE HERO April 4 2004
By A Customer - Published on Amazon.com
This score has only one Hero, the main cello theme for the whole movie. The rest of the score is mostly a constant rambling of music so simular to Tan Dun's Crouching Tiger I found it ruined the movie for me. The main cello theme is huanting and sad like the movie. The price of this disc is even sadder. Go for Crouching Tiger or The Last Samurai by Hans Zimmer.
12 of 31 people found the following review helpful
2.0 out of 5 stars An Attempt, but simply that, to recreate what was. July 3 2004
By Robert Angier - Published on Amazon.com
Verified Purchase
For those few fans who took the time to look deeper into what made Crouching Tiger, Hidden Dragon a good film, you may have learned the name Tan Dun. While others would seek his work, because of his contributions to Crouching, I know of those few, like myself, who have a deeper understanding of music, would seek this album, in hopes to expand the beautiful Composition that is Crouching Tiger, Hidden Dragon. This Review is for you.
While like myself had hoped, you would expect something awe inspiring and completely original out of Hero, when in fact this is not the case. To begin, Tan Dun chose another famous Soloist in hopes for success as he found on Crouching. Yo-Yo Ma who is incomparable was quite possibly the reason for the success of his first score, this time around, however, he chose Itzhak Perlman, a violinist who’s works were made famous after his appearance on John Williams “Schindler’s List.” While on paper, this would sound amazing, Itzhak is very talented and makes the best of what he’s given in the score, but ultimately Tan fails to deliver. His lack of diversity and range is really revealed in Hero, using slightly altered versions of his solo in Crouching performed by Yo in Cello to Itzhak in violin, to which by my opinion is degrading, I am a fan of the violin, but in this composition does not sound as pure and uplifting as the cello did in Crouching. Another fault, is consistency, Tan nearly flawlessly dispersed his cello solos throughout Crouching at nearly the perfect times, but in Hero the violin seems recycled and reused all to much, and while there is a “Theme solo” to Crouching, it’s not overbearing, where as in Hero it becomes uncomfortable and misplaced making this an almost unbearable album to listen to straight through. Most of the time you’re confused as to whether your CD player is on repeat as most of the tracks sound identical, and where they differ, you aren’t paying nearly enough attention to care. Something that was absent from Crouching, Tan attempts to use in Hero, Choir, now before you get your hopes up, like I stated with Itzhak and violin, it does sound good on paper, but Tan’s limited ability is really shown, he chose to use an all male choir, and while it is hard for me to find, just unbearable, I truly cannot listen to it, the fact that it even exists on the score, kills my desire to see the film, the choirs not artistically used in any way, they simply, hum the recycled violin solo, again and again and again. The only ray of hope from the choir, is a female soprano who has her solo on the track entitled “Gone with the Leaves” and while it is one of the better, seemingly more original tracks, it isn’t worth a purchase and still the same solo… again and again and again. Another thing I had hoped for in listening to this score, was the return of his fabulous percussion, “Night Fight” on the Crouching album is so beautifully scored, it makes you wonder why there wasn’t more used, with Hero however, you’re left with a lot more questions, because KODO was used in collaboration with Tan on this score, and their renowned for their abilities with drums, so why is there only one track with a percussion solo? I honestly cannot answer that. Do not get the wrong impression however, you’ll hear plenty of KODO, it’s just either with the horrible violin solo, or the horrible choir, and you’ll have an arsenal of tracks to take your pick to hear both. Ultimately, there is just a lack of broadness, Crouching was diverse and expansive, sounding as Epic as anything, and as enchanting as your nighttime dreams, if you’re looking for another journey through the musical and beautiful dreams that is Chinese cinema and culture, you wont find it here, you’ll find traces and hints of genius scattered among boring reused themes and what would be the beautiful original score that we’d hoped for, fortunately for us, it already exists as Crouching Tiger, Hidden Dragon.
You’ll never know, until you listen to it yourself, but if I were you, I’d look else where.
Search Customer Reviews
Only search this product's reviews

Look for similar items by category


Feedback