Auto boutiques-francophones Simple and secure cloud storage Personal Care Furniture Kindle Music Deals Store Cycling Tools minions
Hickory Dickory Dock: A Hercule Poirot Mystery and over one million other books are available for Amazon Kindle. Learn more
CDN$ 15.19
  • List Price: CDN$ 15.99
  • You Save: CDN$ 0.80 (5%)
FREE Shipping on orders over CDN$ 25.
Only 1 left in stock (more on the way).
Ships from and sold by Amazon.ca.
Gift-wrap available.
Quantity:1
Hickory Dickory Dock: A H... has been added to your Cart
Have one to sell?
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See all 2 images

Hickory Dickory Dock: A Hercule Poirot Mystery Paperback – Sep 9 2011


See all 41 formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Amazon Price New from Used from
Kindle Edition
"Please retry"
Paperback
"Please retry"
CDN$ 15.19
CDN$ 5.03 CDN$ 4.91

Unlimited FREE Two-Day Shipping for Six Months When You Try Amazon Student


Frequently Bought Together

Hickory Dickory Dock: A Hercule Poirot Mystery + Cat Among The Pigeons: A Hercule Poirot Mystery + Third Girl: A Hercule Poirot Mystery
Price For All Three: CDN$ 42.61

Buy the selected items together



Product Details

  • Paperback: 224 pages
  • Publisher: Avon; Reissue edition (Sept. 9 2011)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0062073966
  • ISBN-13: 978-0062073969
  • Product Dimensions: 13.5 x 1.5 x 20.3 cm
  • Shipping Weight: 222 g
  • Average Customer Review: 3.7 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (3 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: #366,323 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Product Description

From Publishers Weekly

Starred Review. Fraser, who played Captain Hastings, the sidekick for arch Belgian detective Hercule Poirot in the PBS Mystery series, now performs the entire cast in Christie's 1955 mystery. Fraser's Poirot is derivative of the stellar performance of the series' star, David Suchet; nevertheless, Fraser gives Christie's work his own imprimatur. Poirot is absent much of the time in this tale of kleptomania, malice and murder set at a boarding house for students. Add to the mix a number of students from England, a temperamental Greek landlady and an Italian house staff, and one must conclude that Fraser is some sort of magician to keep all the players sorted out as they converge in the common room. Not to be missed among the clamoring voices is Christie's narrative, from which Fraser manages to wring every wry drop. The producers at the Mystery Masters division of the Audio Partners were smart to hire Fraser to record this classic, and listeners will find it a delightful romp that passes all too quickly. (Dec.)
Copyright © Reed Business Information, a division of Reed Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved. --This text refers to the Audio CD edition.

Review

“When it comes to fiendish plotting, there’s nobody to compare with Agatha Christie.” (Peter Robinson, New York Times bestselling author of the Inspector Banks novels)

“The Christie fan of longest standing, who thinks he knows every one of her tricks, will still be surprised by some of the twists here.” (New York Times)

“The characters are as good as ever and there is plenty of entertainment.” (Times Literary Supplement (London))

See all Product Description

Inside This Book

(Learn More)
Browse Sample Pages
Front Cover | Copyright | Excerpt | Back Cover
Search inside this book:

What Other Items Do Customers Buy After Viewing This Item?

Customer Reviews

3.7 out of 5 stars
5 star
0
4 star
2
3 star
1
2 star
0
1 star
0
See all 3 customer reviews
Share your thoughts with other customers

Most helpful customer reviews

Format: Mass Market Paperback
revealing that she has a sister! Poirot had never before considered that his incredibly efficient secretary could be so human. Miss Lemon's sister was responsible for the errors as well, there were troubling things taking place in her life. There were thefts taking place at the youth hostel where she worked. Poirot decided to look into the matter as a favor to Miss Lemon and so he could restore the order in his own life.
Poirot begins his investigation of the hostel and its residents but before he can solve the rash of petty thefts a murder occurs, a murder that is only the first of a series. The trail leads Poirot and the police into a world of smuggling with side trips through young love and family secrets.
In typical Christie fashion the clues are all laid out for the reader to follow. There are red herrings to confuse the armchair detective - perhaps a few too many in this one - and of course, the usual Christie 'twist' at the end.
It is often suggested that a writer should write about what they know and this book points out that Christie didn't know very much about unversity students in the mid-fifties. The characters do not come to life in this one they way they do in most of her other books. Keeping the various students/suspects sorted out it difficult because they really aren't very memorable. Also this one seems to suffer from too much - too much plot drug AND gem smuggling, too many red herrings and too many conincidences.
It should be noted that this book was originally written in 1955 and certain parts are very much representative of that time. Stereotypes of Italians, blacks, Indians, Cockneys etc are all present and tend to make the 21st century reader cringe.
Even though this is not one of Christie's masterpieces it is still an excellent read, thoroughly challenging and enjoyable.
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again.
Format: Mass Market Paperback
Hercule Poirot is startled when Miss Lemon, his "perfect machine" of a secretary, makes three mistakes in typing a simple letter. Clearly, something is amiss. Miss Lemon, on questioning, reveals that she is worried about her sister, Mrs. Hubbard. After spending her married life in Singapore, Mrs. Hubbard has returned to England a widow, where she is living as matron of a youth hostel in Hickory Road, an establishment that caters to an international group of students. It seems that things, "odd things," have been disappearing from the hostel, "And all in rather an unnatural way." Miss Lemon suspects it's something more than petty thievery or kleptomania, and Poirot agrees to meet Felicity Lemon's distressed sibling.
Although the story starts strongly with a colourful description of the students in the hostel, it deteriorates rather quickly into a complex micmac of red herrings. It seems as though Christie herself is not sure of the outcome when plotting her story. Of course, it is always fun to meet our dearest detective Hercule Poirot, but the amount of mischief going on in the hostel imposes some strain on the reader's patience as well on Poirot's ingenuity. Clearly one of the weakest novels to feature Poirot.
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again.
Format: Mass Market Paperback
Just as Poirot is noted for his love of order and symmetry, so is his secretary Miss Lemon. Therefore, Poirot is shocked when one morning Miss Lemon makes not one, but three mistakes. Poirot is at first mystified and then discovers that Miss Lemon is worried about her sister, Mrs. Hubbard. Poirot decides he must solve Mrs. Hubbard's problem so Miss Lemon can be her super-efficient self once more.
Mrs. Hubbard, a widow who had previously been living in Singapore, manages a youth hostel at 26 Hickory Road. Youths from many backgrounds, both sexes, and various races have been living together in relative harmony, but suddenly a series of unusual objects begin disappearing from the hostel. After a visit from Poirot, one of the youths admits to the stealing, but that same youth is murdered the next evening. Trouble is just beginning as two more deaths occur. It is up to Poirot to figure out how a false passport, red hair clutched in a dead girl's hand, memories of a college dance, and stolen morphine can explain the strange happenings. Excellent characterizations and plotting, plus Poirot's brilliant detecting make this a classic.
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again.

Most Helpful Customer Reviews on Amazon.com (beta)

Amazon.com: 47 reviews
10 of 10 people found the following review helpful
WILL SOMEONE LET THE WOMAN SPEAK? May 13 2008
By Carver Green - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Mass Market Paperback
What "improvements" have been made for the Berkley edition? There are already major differences in punctuation, word choices, and scene breaks between the original Collins and Dodd Mead (HICKORY DICKORY DEATH) editions of this novel. There are further differences between the Dodd Mead editions republished by Random House/Avenel and the Dodd Mead editions republished by Simon & Shuster/Pocket. There are further differences still in the Signet, Bantam, and Black Dog & Leventhal editions. For every publishing house putting out her works, there seem to be a new batch of editors altering Agatha Christie's words and the sound of her voice. What's the matter with these publishers? Whose voice do they think we want to hear when we sit down to a novel by Agatha Christie? And what will she sound like twenty years from now? It's frightening that her estate has failed to see the importance of guarding her words as she wrote them. Please tell me I'm not the only one here who senses that a crime has been committed.
8 of 9 people found the following review helpful
Too many red herrings spoil the plot Feb. 6 2003
By Geert Daelemans - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Mass Market Paperback
Hercule Poirot is startled when Miss Lemon, his "perfect machine" of a secretary, makes three mistakes in typing a simple letter. Clearly, something is amiss. Miss Lemon, on questioning, reveals that she is worried about her sister, Mrs. Hubbard. After spending her married life in Singapore, Mrs. Hubbard has returned to England a widow, where she is living as matron of a youth hostel in Hickory Road, an establishment that caters to an international group of students. It seems that things, "odd things," have been disappearing from the hostel, "And all in rather an unnatural way." Miss Lemon suspects it's something more than petty thievery or kleptomania, and Poirot agrees to meet Felicity Lemon's distressed sibling.
Although the story starts strongly with a colourful description of the students in the hostel, it deteriorates rather quickly into a complex micmac of red herrings. It seems as though Christie herself is not sure of the outcome when plotting her story. Of course, it is always fun to meet our dearest detective Hercule Poirot, but the amount of mischief going on in the hostel imposes some strain on the reader's patience as well on Poirot's ingenuity. Clearly one of the weakest novels to feature Poirot.
5 of 5 people found the following review helpful
The usual Christie attention to details and twists and turns gives a satisfying twist to this audio. March 5 2007
By Midwest Book Review - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Audio CD
Agatha Christie's HICKORY DICKORY DOCK enjoys Hugh Fraser's warm voice as it tells of an outbreak of thefts at a student hostel, an odd series of missing or vandalized items, and eventually, murder. The usual Christie attention to details and twists and turns gives a satisfying twist to this audio.
5 of 5 people found the following review helpful
laur's review no. 2 Jan. 29 2007
By Tennis - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Audio CD
Hugh Fraser does a very credible job, with all of the accents and people in the book, especially Hercules Poirot - almost as good as David Suchet !!!
3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
"The Mouse Ran Up The Clock..." April 7 2011
By R. M. Fisher - Published on Amazon.com
Agatha Christie often drew upon nursery rhymes and children's stories to provide inspiration (and titles!) for her mysteries; these include A Pocket Full of Rye, Five Little Pigs, One, Two, Buckle My Shoe, and this: Hickory Dickory Dock. In this case however, the famous nursery rhyme is entirely incidental to the plot; you won't find any significant clocks or mice here - the setting of the mystery is on Hickory Road, and Poirot recites the song on the very last page, and that's it. It's a rather tenuous link, though the ITV adaptation milked the title for all it was worth by adding a soundtrack that (rather ridiculously) involved a chorus of singers that stage-whispered: "Hickory Dickory! Hickory Dickory!" every time something suspenseful happened.

But that's neither here nor there. Mr Poirot is astounded that his secretary Miss Lemon (described as hideous, unimaginative and so efficient that she was more machine than woman) has handed him a letter with several spelling mistakes in it. His bewilderment is compounded when Miss Lemon speaks of her sister Mrs Hubbard. Miss Lemon has a sister?! Once his surprise is under control, Poirot listens to what she has to say: that there is a spate of kleptomania going on in the boarding house that Mrs Hubbard helps run, and the thefts are getting more serious.

It's hardly something to interest the superior mind of a detective like Poirot, but his appetite is whetted when he catches a glimpse of the list of stolen items. They range from a diamond ring to light-bulbs to a single shoe to a rucksack which was found shredded into pieces, along with a variety of other disparate objects. He agrees to investigate, and after convincing the temperamental landlady of his good intentions, Mr Poirot suggests presenting a lecture on crime to the young students that live at the hostel in an attempt to flush out the thief. A murder follows soon after...

From here the mystery takes off, but I have to say at this point that "Hickory Dickory" is not one of Christie's best. In fact, it's one of her worst. Though the setting of a youth hostel and the relationships of the students therein is promising, the sheer amount of characters, plot-threads and red herrings that are packed into the novel become too much to keep track of. There are eleven students living at the hostel, many of whom are indistinguishable from each other, and several which are utterly superfluous (and modern readers will no doubt wince at the stereotypical portrayal of the ethnic minorities). Add the four staff members on top of that, and you have a dizzying array of characters in such a slender book.

Plot-wise, it feels like Christie is simply making it up as she goes along, especially when the final solution seems so disconnected from the initial premise, and there's an odd last-minute reveal of a mother/daughter relationship that means nothing and sheds no light on either character. Poirot is certainly at the top of his game when it comes to handling this case, though that's not necessarily a good thing considering he's almost clairvoyant in his deductions whilst at the same time not being as proactive as he usually is in his attempts to catch the killer.

Though it's an interesting premise, and nice to get a look at the personal life of a minor character that lives in Poirot's orbit, "Hickory Dickory" is a bit of a dud. I'd recommend it for Christie completists only.


Feedback