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History of Advertising - Animation (1940-1950) DVD [Import]

A2ZCDS.com    NR (Not Rated)   DVD

Price: CDN$ 19.95
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Product Details

  • Directors: A2ZCDS.com
  • Format: Animated, Black & White, Collector's Edition, Color, DVD-Video, Full length, Full Screen, Original recording remastered, Restored, Special Edition, NTSC, Import
  • Language: English
  • Region: All RegionsAll Regions
  • Aspect Ratio: 1.33:1
  • Number of discs: 1
  • MPAA Rating: NR
  • Studio: Tapeworm
  • Release Date: Sept. 7 2006
  • Run Time: 66 minutes
  • ASIN: B00078JWCM

Product Description

From the Contributor

Amongst The Funniest Animated Advertisements From The 1940s! A Unique Collection From The Golden Age Of Animation! From Classic Lucky Strike Ads To Clever AT&T Promotions, This DVD Has It All! This DVD is a veritable blast from the past! Take an exciting journey re-visiting this classic decade of animated advertising. If you are fascinated by classic hand drawn animation or just want to see some amusing film shorts you need the History Of Advertising - Animation 1940-1950 DVD! Beautiful Hand Drawn Animation! Today’s computer generated graphics may make for highly realistic movie special effects, but face it – they are not works of art. These advertising shorts, however, are all hand drawn by master animation craftsmen. Frame by frame, these artists labored over these classic ads. Each one is a work of art! See Classic Cigarette Advertisements! While today even cigarette billboards generate controversy, in the 1940s it was common to see ads for tobacco on television and in the movies. This DVD contains some of the best cigarette advertising ever created for Lucky Strike. You think Joe Camel was aimed at children? You will realize how quickly attitudes towards cigarettes have changed when you see live action animation used to encourage people to smoke! It’s incredible! This Is One Of The Greatest Eras Of Animation Ever! By the 1940s studios had finally mastered the art of hand drawn animation. That is why on this amazing DVD you will see some of the greatest animated ads ever put on the screen! You will be amazed at the level of detail these dedicated artists were able to put together! Take an exciting journey, re-visiting this decade of animated advertising. This DVD has some of the great production houses of the era such as Jam Handy, U.S. Dept. of Agriculture (Forest Service) and John Sutherland, providing glimpses of the marketing strategies used during the sunrise of motion pictures and the birth of television.

Customer Reviews

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Most Helpful Customer Reviews on Amazon.com (beta)
Amazon.com: 4.5 out of 5 stars  11 reviews
2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Advertising? Education? Propaganda? Jan. 30 2005
By R. Jurosik - Published on Amazon.com
Format:DVD
Animation isn't just for entertainment - it's an incredible teaching tool, enabling the animator/producer to present a clear visual argument or succinct explanation of otherwise complex processes. Today we rarely ever see animation in the classroom, and only occasionally in a handful of commercials, but in the 1940s, over 40% of advertising was animated. These shrewd producers - Oldsmobile, General Motors, AT&T, GE, Lucky Strike, Kellogg and the New York Stock Exchange, among others - knew the power of the medium, and they used it!

Curious as to what some of these ads looked like? I picked up DVD copies of the entire History of Advertising: Animation series put out by A2ZCDs, and I have to admit that I'm very impressed by both the quality of the transfers and the variety of films included. If you're curious, here's a list of the contents for each:

H of A: Animation 1930-1940: My Merry Oldsmobile, Down the Gasoline Trail, A Coach for Cinderella, A Ride for Cinderella, Peg Leg Pedro, Extra Esso, Breakfast Pals, The Princess and the Pauper

H of A: Animation 1940-1950: Something for Nothing, Drawing Account, Just Imagine, The Adventures of Junior Raindrop, Lucky Strike Marching, Lucky Strike Dancing, Going Places, Meet King Joe

H of A: Animation 1950-1960: Eisenhower for President, Freedom and Power, What Makes Us Tick, It's Everybody's Business, Destination Earth, Working Dollars

What is so great about these cartoons is that they force us to examine the definitions of entertainment, education and propaganda. At a time when "Communist" animators were being hunted down through HUAC hearings for the crime of influencing the masses, "Capitalist" producers were busy commissioning a stream of public films supporting free-market ideologies, consumer choices and shareholder investments. As Karl F. Cohen writes in his 1997 book, Forbidden Animation, "While these historic films may be seen as harmless educational messages, what if a group that you disagree with sponsors television cartoons in the future?" In an increasingly polemic society, it's an important question, and one that these advertising anthologies can bring back into light.

Or, you can simply enjoy the first Snap!, Crackle!, Pop! Rice Krispies commercial, "Breakfast Pals" - it's your choice, after all.
1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars It Brought Back My Youth May 5 2006
By delores - Published on Amazon.com
Format:DVD
Why aren't more advertisements like this made today. They are so innocent and not awful like the comercials on the television.

Seeing these ads made me very happy. I could actually sing along to many of the older commercials and I had forgotten how much fun some of these were.

The cartoons are silly of course, but in a wholesome nice way.
1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Wow! This taught me a lot!" May 2 2006
By Jonathan Champlovier - Published on Amazon.com
Format:DVD
"I showed these DVDs to my advertising professor! He couldn't believe it! All of the supposedly "modern" advertising methods we were learning were on display here - back in the 1930s! Wow! This taught me a lot!"
1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A Laugh Riot May 2 2006
By Arthur - Published on Amazon.com
Format:DVD
This DVD is great for the sheer amusement factor alone. In the early 1940s we were in a golden age of cinema, but we clearly were not in a golden age of using moving pictures to sell products.

Because the medium was so new, these directors seemed ready to try anything to sell stuff and simply see what would work. So, they made a lot of cartoon characters - some cute, some simply bizarre - to try to get movie patrons to buy products.

The results includes square dancing, musical cigarettes and other strange, strange cartoon characters.

The cuts are somewhat rough, but I simply could not stop watching the trainwreck that some of these ads are.

I loved it.
5 of 7 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Welcome to the real world April 25 2006
By Wayne A. - Published on Amazon.com
Format:DVD
The quality is not terrific and there are problems--and this stuff is in the public domain. However, this is about the only way to get this material and it is of considerable interest for animators and cultural historians.

Before DVD people didn't "restore" films much and before DVD and video tape (an era I remember too well) access to just about everything was limited to the point of just not there for you. We've gotten a bit spoiled and our expectations on media material are way too high; unrealistic even. If this material was restored the DVD would cost an exorbitant amount of money and probably wouldn't exist--restoration is expensive. One of my favorite East German science fiction films was restored by the University of Massachusetts German language department and offered for educational sale only for $150--it was the only way they could justify the expense.

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