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Home of the Brave [Blu-ray] [Import]


List Price: CDN$ 35.99
Price: CDN$ 24.98 & FREE Shipping on orders over CDN$ 25. Details
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    FREE Shipping on orders over CDN$ CDN$ 25. Details

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Product Details

  • Format: NTSC, Import
  • Language: English
  • Region: Region A/1
  • Aspect Ratio: 1.33:1
  • Number of discs: 1
  • MPAA Rating: UNRATED
  • Studio: Mongrel Media
  • Release Date: May 13 2014
  • ASIN: B00IQAUO3O


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Most Helpful Customer Reviews on Amazon.com (beta)

Amazon.com: 10 reviews
17 of 17 people found the following review helpful
"Coward, Take My Coward Hand" Oct. 23 2006
By Kevin Killian - Published on Amazon.com
Format: VHS Tape
Watched this one having read Donald Bogle's book and curious about James Edwards, MGM's first black leading man in the 1940s. Bogle paints Edwards as a dangerous rebel, skilled in New York acting techniques and like other newcomers to the screen, Brando and Clift, striving to bring a new realism to glossy studio confections. And in the period there seems to have been a shortlived interest in producing progressive, "social awareness" pictures that inevitably included racial struggle. All of the Hollywood studios made one or two apiece during a single year, and MGM turned out this one (along with INTRUDER IN THE DUST, an old fashioned, classic film compared to the B-movie innovations of HOME OF THE BRAVE). It is a curious piece of work, but Edwards' performance is transfigurative. He rips up the screen as Private Peter Moss, a black serviceman attached to a white volunteer platoon of engineers assigned to mao out a dangerous Pacific atoll at the height of World War II.

Blacks weren't integrated into the larger Armed Services, and only later would Harry Truman force the policy of integration down the army's throat, but of course there were individual liberals and "social conservatives" everywhere, even during the 1940s. Lloyd Bridges plays a boyhood friend of "Mossy," and he seems genuinely, even freakishly colorblind, not understanding why Moss has a problem being his friend. For him, racism doesn't exist except if individual people see it as a problem. His character, Finch, a warm volkstümlich type of guy, gets captured by the Japanese on the island and the rest of the platoon, in hiding while surveying. Were the Japanese so cruel as this movie makes them out to be? To lure the remaining men out of the underbrush, they pierce Finch with bayonets to make him scream, over and over again. No wonder Mossy suffers from post traumatic stress and loses the ability to walk again!

A kindly yet gruff psychiatrist (Jeff Corey, authoritative and hammy as Freud himself) is assigned to snap Mossy out of it and return him to society in one piece.

But how can he do that when society itself has race consciousness embedded in it?

It's the rare US film in which a contemporary poem, in this case Eve Merriam's "The Coward," is given a full and dramatic close reading that preciptates the action on the one hand, and on the other helps to characterize one of the other GIs, the gruff sergeant, Mingo (Frank Lovejoy), whose wife supposedly wrote the poem, then a Dear John letter to him.

- Only we two, and yet our howling can

Encircle the world's end.

Frightened, you are my only friend.

And frightened, we are everyone.

Someone must make a stand.

Coward, take my coward's hand.

While Edwards is ostensibly the main character, HOME OF THE BRAVE is Corey's show too, and their pas de deux in the film's last quarter has the genuine power and sweep of director Mark Robson's best work.
9 of 11 people found the following review helpful
home of the brave Dec 19 2009
By Thomas D. Doherty - Published on Amazon.com
Verified Purchase
This is a great movie. This review does not reflect on the movie itself which is a 5 star movie. However the quality of both the audio and video of the dvd is terrible. It looks like a copy of a copy of a copy of a copy etc. Audio skips and is choppy at times. The video is of sub standard quality. The picture skips and or jumps at times. This dvd is essentialy a piece of junk and should not have been sold.
2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
Important breakthrough for black actors. Nov. 25 2009
By John F. Gillespie - Published on Amazon.com
The film re-enactment of the stage play was a break through for black actors as James Edwards portrayed an intelligent soldier who had developed a friendship growing up with a white teenager played by Lloyd Bridges. Sent on a mission to a Japanese held island to gather intelligence, the mission goes awry and Lloyd Bridges character is captured and tortured by the Japanese. James Edwards is forced to listen to the sounds of Bridges torture. The Americans escape, leaving Bridges behind and Edwards deeply scared by the experience. He is sent for psychartic care and under the influence of drug therapy re-lives growing up black with his white friend. In the end, the character played by Frank Lovejoy who has lost his arm and Edwards team up to work together by opening a bar in post war America, an early portent of blacks and whites being able to break out of traditional stereotypes.
1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
One of the best war dramas out there. Aug. 1 2008
By thesavvybamalady - Published on Amazon.com
Format: VHS Tape
One of the most interesting movies that I always wanted to see was this movie. I thought Lloyd Bridges would play this troop dogging on James Edwards character, but come to find out that Bridges and Edwards characters knew each other as children, and though Bridges is accepting of him, the others are more cagey of him. A very interesting character study on a platoon of soldiers in a precarious and delicate situation. I wish it was on DVD by now but sadly, it hasn't made the transition yet. I was blessed to see it on TCM (Turner Classic Movies)some years back.
3 of 4 people found the following review helpful
Important movie, terrible reproduction Jan. 25 2010
By D. Yarbrough - Published on Amazon.com
Verified Purchase
Sadly, this reproduction is of so poor quality that this movie is virtually unwatchable. I am keeping the DVD as it is the only copy I could fine, the message is somewhat obscured with all of the washouts, skips, lost dialog...but perhaps the message of understand, patience, and tolerance can be learned by watching such a bad reproduction.
I would recommend this movie to everyone, just not this copy of it.

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