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Home Ice: Reflections on Backyard Rinks and Frozen Ponds [Paperback]

Jack Falla
5.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (4 customer reviews)

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Product Description

From Amazon

Anyone who's ever played hockey in the open air will treasure Jack Falla's warm, witty memoir, Home Ice. The New England sports journalist describes how building his backyard rink became a yearly ritual, drawing him closer to family and friends as he "descended the ladder of sports evolution" toward the heart of the game he loves. Falla quotes with approval his 8-year-old daughter, who turns down his offer of figure skating lessons-- "I want to have my own fun, not somebody else's fun." Wonderful moments are captured: an afternoon after a desultory indoor practice when the teenage team he coaches finds a stretch of frozen river on the way home and rediscovers the joy of playing; Falla and his wife together on the rink at midnight, welcoming in the new millennium. We see the rink becoming his best way to connect with the world, a place where friends play shinny, unwind, and reveal their characters by the degree of their willingness to shovel the ice. Near the end he even offers useful instructions on the best way to set up a backyard rink of one's own. Home Ice is an unassuming classic, indispensable for anyone who wants to really understand the world's greatest game. --David Gowdey

From Library Journal

There is no shortage of books that describe how participating in a particular sporting activity strengthens bonds between people. Falla's book accomplishes this feat through a collection of essays on backyard skating rinks and frozen ponds and how these local skating venues allow their participants to get in touch with the game of hockey in addition to building relationships with family and friends. The author, a sportswriter and author of Sports Illustrated Hockey, is the architect and CEO of his full-scale backyard rink, the Bacon Street Omni, around which neighborhood life seems to revolve during the long, cold months. Each essay is short and provides for excellent recreational reading for people interested in skating in general and hockey in particular. Throughout, the author's love for winter sports is clear, especially as a link between his New England childhood and his current life, but readers who have never put on a pair of skates may have trouble connecting with this well written book. Recommended for public libraries already stocked with a strong collection of winter-oriented sports books.DPatrick Mahoney, Off-Campus Lib. Svcs., Central Michigan Univ.
Copyright 2001 Reed Business Information, Inc. --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

Review

“Home Ice is a treasure.…Possibly the best book since Ken Dryden’s The Game.”
–Eric Duhatschek

“Literary hot chocolate that will warm your heart.”
New York Times

From the Publisher

Jack Falla`s work has appeared in SPORTS ILLUSTRATED, THE HOCKEY NEWS, BOSTONIA MAGAZINE, and many more national sports periodicals. He is also the author of SPORTS ILLUSTRATED HOCKEY. Falla is an adjunct professor at Boston University`s College of Communication. --This text refers to an alternate Paperback edition.

From the Back Cover

“Home Ice is a treasure.…Possibly the best book since Ken Dryden’s The Game.”
–Eric Duhatschek

“Literary hot chocolate that will warm your heart.”
New York Times

About the Author

Jack Falla has written for Sports Illustrated and The Hockey News, and is the author of Sports Illustrated Hockey. His backyard rink, which he has built each winter for the last 18 years, has been featured in Sports Illustrated, and on the television programs Hockey Night in Canada and CBS News Sunday Morning. Jack Falla teaches Sports Journalism at Boston University’s College of Communication. He lives in Natick, Massachusetts.
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