Vous voulez voir cette page en français ? Cliquez ici.

CDN$ 11.01 + CDN$ 3.49 shipping
In Stock. Sold by cddvd4u_ca

or
Sign in to turn on 1-Click ordering.
More Buying Choices
moviemars-c... Add to Cart
CDN$ 24.57
Vanderbilt CA Add to Cart
CDN$ 24.57
marvelio-ca Add to Cart
CDN$ 24.58
Have one to sell? Sell yours here

Horenstein conducts Mahler Symphony No. 1 & Bruckner Symphony No. 9

J-Vienna Symp Orch Horensdtein Audio CD
5.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (2 customer reviews)
Price: CDN$ 11.01
o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o
In Stock.
Ships from and sold by cddvd4u_ca.

Customers Who Bought This Item Also Bought


Product Details


Disc: 1
1. Symphony No. 1 in D major ('Titan'): 1. Langsam, schleppend
2. Symphony No. 1 in D major ('Titan'): 2. Kräftig bewegt, doch nicht zu schnell
3. Symphony No. 1 in D major ('Titan'): 3. Feierlich und gemessen, ohne zu schleppen
4. Symphony No. 1 in D major ('Titan'): 4. Stürmisch Bewegt
Disc: 2
1. Symphony No. 9 in D minor, WAB 109: 1. Feierlich, misterioso
2. Symphony No. 9 in D minor, WAB 109: 2. Scherzo (Bewegt, lebhaft)
3. Symphony No. 9 in D minor, WAB 109: 3. Adagio (Langsam, feierlich)

Product Description


Customer Reviews

4 star
0
3 star
0
2 star
0
1 star
0
5.0 out of 5 stars
5.0 out of 5 stars
Most helpful customer reviews
5.0 out of 5 stars Top Notch Mahler and Bruckner for a Song Nov. 19 2001
Jascha Horenstein (1899-1973) was an incomparable Bruckner and Mahler conductor who, unfortunately, made few commercial recordings. Late in his life he re-recorded the Mahler First and Bruckner Ninth symphonies in stereo, but, as good as those recordings are (on Unicorn and BBC Classics CDs), these earlier performances on Vox are still very special. Yes, the playing is sometimes scrappy and the sound is mono, but Horenstein's intelligent intensity carries all before it. Every element of both scores is projected with amazing clarity, yet there is a palpable sense - at all times - of a transcending "grand line" that shapes the details into completely convincing wholes. And let's not overstate the scrappiness of the playing by the Vienna Symphony. Vox made these recordings on shoestring budgets with next to no opportunity for rehearsal. Given the complexity of these scores, what Horenstein and the orchestra achieved under such conditions is nothing less than miraculous. Sound quality is good for the date (ca. 1955); indeed, in the Bruckner 9th more than good. It is certainly good enough to allow you to hear how great the performances are and to enjoy them as music. And the price is quite spectacular! Playing Mahler and Bruckner in the 1950s was by no means a common thing, and hearing these recordings today captures some of the sense of pioneer excitement that accompanied their original release.
Was this review helpful to you?
Okay, why is it that your neighborhood amateur orchestras survive? My theory is that you have enthusiastic amateurs, often skilled, often not, who give their all into a performance. Sure, the strings are often out of tune, the woodwinds miss their entrances, and the brass flub left and right, but you don't go there to hear perfect technique; you go there for the music, which can transcend the limits of the performers when presented with enthusiastic magnetism, especially when the podium is bearing a talented, patient leader.
The Vienna Symphony was a mighty scrappy bunch when Horenstein made these recordings. But Horenstein was on the podium, and every player believed in him to the last man, or so it sounds. You have not heard Mahler's 1st until you've heard this incredible performance. Forget that the horns can't play in tune at all in the Finale; forgive the strings for their wildly undisciplined playing. It all comes together into a transcendental experience.
The Bruckner 9th I can't comment on in detail since I don't know it as well. All I do know is that when I listen to it, gee, it sounds well, short! Yet it gets its own disc, so I assume it is in the ballpark timingwise of other performances, and I enjoy it too. Same comments, btw, about the engineering and the orchestra.
The engineering: it's mono. It's not too bad. It doesn't hinder the performance, so I guess it is "open" enough. I rarely buy mono performances, but Horenstein's outings on Vox are an exception I'm almost always happy to make.
Was this review helpful to you?
Most Helpful Customer Reviews on Amazon.com (beta)
Amazon.com: 4.7 out of 5 stars  7 reviews
20 of 20 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Top Notch Mahler and Bruckner for a Song Nov. 19 2001
By T. Beers - Published on Amazon.com
Jascha Horenstein (1899-1973) was an incomparable Bruckner and Mahler conductor who, unfortunately, made few commercial recordings. Late in his life he re-recorded the Mahler First and Bruckner Ninth symphonies in stereo, but, as good as those recordings are (on Unicorn and BBC Classics CDs), these earlier performances on Vox are still very special. Yes, the playing is sometimes scrappy and the sound is mono, but Horenstein's intelligent intensity carries all before it. Every element of both scores is projected with amazing clarity, yet there is a palpable sense - at all times - of a transcending "grand line" that shapes the details into completely convincing wholes. And let's not overstate the scrappiness of the playing by the Vienna Symphony. Vox made these recordings on shoestring budgets with next to no opportunity for rehearsal. Given the complexity of these scores, what Horenstein and the orchestra achieved under such conditions is nothing less than miraculous. Sound quality is good for the date (ca. 1955); indeed, in the Bruckner 9th more than good. It is certainly good enough to allow you to hear how great the performances are and to enjoy them as music. And the price is quite spectacular! Playing Mahler and Bruckner in the 1950s was by no means a common thing, and hearing these recordings today captures some of the sense of pioneer excitement that accompanied their original release.
16 of 20 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars An amazing interpretation with scrappy playing and recording July 24 2000
By Gregory M. Zinkl - Published on Amazon.com
Okay, why is it that your neighborhood amateur orchestras survive? My theory is that you have enthusiastic amateurs, often skilled, often not, who give their all into a performance. Sure, the strings are often out of tune, the woodwinds miss their entrances, and the brass flub left and right, but you don't go there to hear perfect technique; you go there for the music, which can transcend the limits of the performers when presented with enthusiastic magnetism, especially when the podium is bearing a talented, patient leader.
The Vienna Symphony was a mighty scrappy bunch when Horenstein made these recordings. But Horenstein was on the podium, and every player believed in him to the last man, or so it sounds. You have not heard Mahler's 1st until you've heard this incredible performance. Forget that the horns can't play in tune at all in the Finale; forgive the strings for their wildly undisciplined playing. It all comes together into a transcendental experience.
The Bruckner 9th I can't comment on in detail since I don't know it as well. All I do know is that when I listen to it, gee, it sounds well, short! Yet it gets its own disc, so I assume it is in the ballpark timingwise of other performances, and I enjoy it too. Same comments, btw, about the engineering and the orchestra.
The engineering: it's mono. It's not too bad. It doesn't hinder the performance, so I guess it is "open" enough. I rarely buy mono performances, but Horenstein's outings on Vox are an exception I'm almost always happy to make.
3 of 4 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars stellar performances July 27 2005
By einv - Published on Amazon.com
the mahler symphony especially is well nuanced. unlike the other reviewer(s), i felt that the belated entry of brass and winds in some passages was intentional, part of horenstein's interpretation, and not due to the supposedly primitive state of affairs with the then vienna orchestra. the final movement is unparalleled, the climaxes beautifully controlled, and the orchestra behaves like a living organism rather than a well-oiled machine, a trap into which so many recent mahler performances fall.

the relatively brisk pace of the bruckner 9th (the whole work takes place in about 52 minutes) causes some pacing problems which horenstein handles by slowing down the tempo during the climaxes. this gives the music a kind of deliberate and even affected ponderousness, not especially in keeping with the philosophical mood of bruckner. still, it is a great performance, even if it falls short of being among the greatest. here too, brass and woodwind entries are staggered to good effect, as in the mahler first. (it almost seems like a horenstein trademark.)
7 of 10 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Be careful! This is very subpar playing in boxy mono Sept. 21 2005
By Santa Fe Listener - Published on Amazon.com
HOrenstein is a great musician, but he was stuck in the Vox years with dismal orchestra and very poor mono sound. YOu get both in these two perfomances. I for one couldn't listen to them for all that I admire the conductor.
5.0 out of 5 stars Superb Interpretations Feb. 25 2014
By reading man - Published on Amazon.com
Verified Purchase
According to Norman Lebrecht, Horenstein is supposed to have said on his deathbed that one thing he regretted was that he would never hear DAS LIED VON DER ERDE again. (I'm pretty sure he said "hear", not "play").

On my deathbed, one of the things I'll regret is that I'll never hear Horenstein's recordings of Mahler and Bruckner again.

Even here with bad recorded sound, we have two masterpieces, essential to any lover of these two great composers.

Anything of Mahler or Bruckner by Horenstein is worth hearing, even his DAS LIED with Mitchinson and a female singer whose name I can't at the moment recall and a second-string orchestra.

The man was a genius in this repertoire and deserves to be ranked with the greats and certainly above the near-greats like Lenny Bernstein.
Search Customer Reviews
Only search this product's reviews

Look for similar items by category


Feedback