Hotspur (Sister Jane) and over one million other books are available for Amazon Kindle. Learn more
Have one to sell?
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See this image

Hotspur Hardcover – Nov 26 2002


See all 4 formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Amazon Price New from Used from
Kindle Edition
"Please retry"
Hardcover
"Please retry"
CDN$ 33.98 CDN$ 0.07

Best Canadian Books of 2014
Margaret Atwood's stunning new collection of stories, Stone Mattress, is our #1 Canadian pick for 2014. See all

Customers Who Bought This Item Also Bought



Product Details

  • Hardcover: 352 pages
  • Publisher: Ballantine Books; 1 edition (Nov. 26 2002)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0345428226
  • ISBN-13: 978-0345428226
  • Product Dimensions: 24.1 x 16.3 x 2.9 cm
  • Shipping Weight: 603 g
  • Average Customer Review: 3.2 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (14 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: #745,044 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Product Description

From Publishers Weekly

Tally-ho! From bestseller Brown (Outfoxed and many other delicious books) comes a dashing and vibrant novel that revolves around foxhunting. The rolling hills of central Virginia are home to the Jefferson Hunt-and to scores of sly foxes, red, black and gray. When 34-year-old Peppermint dies peacefully of natural causes, the grave dug for the beloved horse uncovers the skeleton of Nola Bancroft, identifiable by her ring, the Hapsburg sapphire. The ravishing Nola disappeared without a trace from Sorrel Burrus's party 21 years earlier, leaving behind a shocked and, eventually, mourning father and mother, Edward and Tedi, and a sister, Sibyl. Many members of the hunt thought she'd eloped with handsome (but socially inferior) Guy Ramy, the sheriff's son, who went missing at the same time. Seventy-one-year-old Master of the Hunt Jane "Sister" Arnold soon finds herself searching for human prey as well as foxes. The author portrays the hunt family with such warmth and luxury of detail, one feels a friendship with each and every character, animals included. The reader will romp through the book like a hunter on a thoroughbred, never stopping for a meal or a night's sleep. A glossary of useful terms will aid those who've never ridden to the hounds.
Copyright 2002 Reed Business Information, Inc.

From Library Journal

While burying a dead horse, several members of the Jefferson Hunt Club uncover a human body. Seventysomething master of the hunt Jane Arnold recognizes the ring on the skeleton's finger. It belonged to a sexy young club member who, along with her boyfriend, disappeared 21 years earlier. Later, the young man's skeleton is also found. Having believed that she knew her club's members well, Jane is stunned to realize that one or more of them may be murderers. Determined to uncover the killer, she sets a trap (which is very contrived, compelling the reader to suspend disbelief). Despite the promising beginning, this follow-up to Outfoxed ultimately disappoints. There is too much tell and not enough show, and endless dialog from the human and animal characters distracts rather than adds to the plot. Recommended only for public libraries with avid Brown fans.
--Patsy E. Gray, Huntsville
Copyright 2002 Reed Business Information, Inc.

Inside This Book (Learn More)
Browse and search another edition of this book.
Browse Sample Pages
Front Cover | Copyright | Excerpt
Search inside this book:

Customer Reviews

3.2 out of 5 stars

Most helpful customer reviews

Format: Mass Market Paperback
I adored this book. It took me away to another world. It is full of violence, passion, lust, envy, anger, love and grace. The folks in the Jefferson County Hunt Club are all so complex and each one has his or her own fully fleshed out backstory and then there are the animals: Dragon the arrogant hound, Inky the black fox, wise Aunt Netty the red fox, Athena the fearless horned owl and Raleigh the devoted Doberman. The creatures in Rita Mae Browns books all have intense lives and opinions of their own and I cared about them as much if not more than the people.
Some reviewers complained that the book gets too deeply into the day to day life of the hunt but that IS what the book is about :Sister Jane's life with murder thrown in to complicate things. I loved Sister. She's a tough old girl with a mind as sharp as Jane Marple. My only regret with this entire series is that Sister is 71. I hope this series goes on for quite a while and at this rate Sister may have to live to be over 100 like Poirot did.
If you want a book that offers a complete escape from the ordinary and you want a book that takes its time to settle into the story then you'll like Hostspur.
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again.
Format: Hardcover
Okay, so Rita Mae indulged in her love of hunting a bit too much for some readers! I actually enjoyed learning about this, especially since I didn't know that in this country they merely chase the fox to his/her den, and try to avoid killing them. That was always the reason I avoided books on this in England, it seems an inhumane sport there on the line of cockfighting in this country. The interplay between the various animals always has me cracking up in Brown's novels. Since I have cats and dogs of my own, I am very aware they have personalities, and often consider us humans to be their pets rather than vice versa. I also remember long ago in biology they used to teach that we could not anthromorphize animals (give them human traits) like playing, but I've seen too many animals do things just for the plain fun of it rather than merely to eat and reproduce...another scientific fallacy hits the fan!
In this book, the mystery seemed more of a side plot, with the hunting information taking precedence. I am sure this is what other readers complained about. This was not a big enough flaw for me to avoid finishing the book, I actually got through it quickly because I enjoyed it. So it wasn't gory...big deal. The mystery dealt with an old cold case, that actually wasn't even a case, since no one knew what had happened to the people involved. One beautiful young woman disappears off the face of the earth, along with one of her boyfriends. Unfortunately, the inevitable change in ground and water levels, added to hunting and dogs digging brought up some old bones, proving to be human.
Sister, the head of the hunt in this area, may be older, but certainly has not lost either her riding/hunting abilities, or her concern for others.
Read more ›
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again.
Format: Hardcover
While I love Rita Mae Brown's ability to co-mingle the animal and human experience, I found her detailing of the incredible complexity of the fox hunting set to be more information than I need to read a mystery.
I love Jane "Sister" Arnold, the 71 year-old Master of the Hunt and her friends/hounds/horses, but the details in this book would appeal to only the most dedicated hunt fan. I did learn one good thing, however. Americans only hunt the fox to its den, not like their brutal British cousins who hunt to the death.
HOTSPUR's murder mystery takes a second -- or sometimes third -- seat to the machinations of the hunt season, the old money, the social climbers and all the ins and outs of hunt life. I suppose if you're a member of that set, these details and the constant fretting over your horse, your wardrobe and your standing in your club would make for good reading.
It just doesn't play in Peoria....or a small town in east Texas.
I'll continue to read Rita Mae Brown and hope she realizes she's exhausted the hunt and it's time to move on to other prey.
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again.
Format: Hardcover
Fortunately for me, I'd borrowed "Hotspur" from the library. The trouble was not that the book was poorly written or that it was terribly uninteresting and banal. The trouble was that I was expecting a mystery novel along the lines of Rita Mae Brown's "Wish You Were Here" & "Rest in Pieces;" the trouble was that the mystery plot kept getting sidelined by the ruminations of the animals (foxes, horses, owls, etc) and the politics of the Jefferson Hunt club. Another problem was that I couldn't for the life of me figure out how the title fitted into the novel. Indications seem to suggest that one of the characters had a Hotspur-like personality, except that I couldn't quite see it. But perhaps that fault lies with me.
"Hotspur" centers on the murder of Nola Bancroft. Nola, was the beautiful and capricious younger daughter of the well heeled Bancrofts, Edward and Tedi. And about twenty-one years ago, she disappeared. Since she was dating the sheriff's dashing son, Guy, and her parents openly disapproved of that relationship, everyone assumed when the couple suddenly disappeared that Nola and Guy had eloped. But as the years passed and nothing was heard of the pair, local gossip also included the speculation that Guy had murdered Nola in a fit of anger and left town in order to avoid arrest. The recent discovery of Nola's body now bolsters the latter theory. But "Sister" Jane Arnold, Master of the Jefferson Hunt Club doesn't believe that Guy murdered Nola, and she's determined to discover what really happened even if it means reopening old wounds and stirring things up -- even a murderer's ire...
Read more ›
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again.

Most recent customer reviews



Feedback