Hotspur ("Sister" Jane) and over one million other books are available for Amazon Kindle. Learn more

Vous voulez voir cette page en français ? Cliquez ici.

Have one to sell? Sell yours here
Start reading Hotspur ("Sister" Jane) on your Kindle in under a minute.

Don't have a Kindle? Get your Kindle here, or download a FREE Kindle Reading App.

Hotspur [Hardcover]

Rita Mae Brown
3.2 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (14 customer reviews)

Available from these sellers.


Formats

Amazon Price New from Used from
Kindle Edition --  
Hardcover --  
Mass Market Paperback CDN $9.99  
Join Amazon Student in Canada


Book Description

Nov. 26 2002
In her well-received novel Outfoxed, Rita Mae Brown vividly and deftly brought to life the genteel world of foxhunting, where hunters, horses, hounds, and foxes form a tightly knit community amidst old money and simmering conflicts. With Hotspur, we return to the Southern chase–and to a hunt on the trail of a murderer.

Jane “Sister” Arnold may be in her seventies, but she shows no signs of losing her love for the Hunt. As Master of the prestigious Jefferson Hunt Club in a well-heeled Virginia Blue Ridge Mountain town, she is the most powerful and revered woman in the county. She can assess the true merits of a man or a horse with uncanny skill. In short, Sister Jane is not easily duped.

When the skeleton of Nola Bancroft, still wearing an exquisite sapphire ring on her finger, is unearthed, it brings back a twenty-one year old mystery. Beautiful Nola was a girl who had more male admirers than her family had money, which was certainly quite a feat. In a world where a woman’s ability to ride was considered one of her most important social graces, Nola was queen of the stable. She had a weakness for men, and her tastes often ventured towards the inappropriate, like the sheriff’s striking son, Guy Ramy. But even Guy couldn’t keep her eyes from wandering.

When Nola and Guy disappeared on the Hunt’s ceremonial first day of cubbing more than two decades ago, everyone assumed one of two things: Guy and Nola eloped to escape her family’s disapproval; or Guy killed Nola in a jealous rage and vanished. But Sister Jane had never bought either of those theories.
Sister knows that all the players are probably still in place, the old feuds haven’t died, and the sparks that led to a long-ago murder could flare up at any time.

Hotspur brings all of Rita Mae Brown’s storytelling gifts to the fore. It’s a tale of Southern small-town manners and rituals, a compelling and intricate murder mystery, and a look at the human/animal relationship in all its complexity and charm.

Customers Who Bought This Item Also Bought


Product Details


Product Description

From Publishers Weekly

Tally-ho! From bestseller Brown (Outfoxed and many other delicious books) comes a dashing and vibrant novel that revolves around foxhunting. The rolling hills of central Virginia are home to the Jefferson Hunt-and to scores of sly foxes, red, black and gray. When 34-year-old Peppermint dies peacefully of natural causes, the grave dug for the beloved horse uncovers the skeleton of Nola Bancroft, identifiable by her ring, the Hapsburg sapphire. The ravishing Nola disappeared without a trace from Sorrel Burrus's party 21 years earlier, leaving behind a shocked and, eventually, mourning father and mother, Edward and Tedi, and a sister, Sibyl. Many members of the hunt thought she'd eloped with handsome (but socially inferior) Guy Ramy, the sheriff's son, who went missing at the same time. Seventy-one-year-old Master of the Hunt Jane "Sister" Arnold soon finds herself searching for human prey as well as foxes. The author portrays the hunt family with such warmth and luxury of detail, one feels a friendship with each and every character, animals included. The reader will romp through the book like a hunter on a thoroughbred, never stopping for a meal or a night's sleep. A glossary of useful terms will aid those who've never ridden to the hounds.
Copyright 2002 Reed Business Information, Inc.

From Library Journal

While burying a dead horse, several members of the Jefferson Hunt Club uncover a human body. Seventysomething master of the hunt Jane Arnold recognizes the ring on the skeleton's finger. It belonged to a sexy young club member who, along with her boyfriend, disappeared 21 years earlier. Later, the young man's skeleton is also found. Having believed that she knew her club's members well, Jane is stunned to realize that one or more of them may be murderers. Determined to uncover the killer, she sets a trap (which is very contrived, compelling the reader to suspend disbelief). Despite the promising beginning, this follow-up to Outfoxed ultimately disappoints. There is too much tell and not enough show, and endless dialog from the human and animal characters distracts rather than adds to the plot. Recommended only for public libraries with avid Brown fans.
--Patsy E. Gray, Huntsville
Copyright 2002 Reed Business Information, Inc.

Inside This Book (Learn More)
Browse and search another edition of this book.
Browse Sample Pages
Front Cover | Copyright | Excerpt
Search inside this book:

Customer Reviews

Most helpful customer reviews
2.0 out of 5 stars Tally Ho July 8 2004
Format:Mass Market Paperback
An o.k. story if you can get past the talking birds and animals. Tough to be outfoxed by a fox! I thought this was the first book by Ms Brown I had read, but on checking my list of books read, I find "Riding Shotgun" which I don't recall one bit. I guess there were no talking animals in it. Guess not too much effort was put into solving the mystery at the time of Nola's disappearance cause everyone thought the 2 eloped. But had there been, it wouldn't have been difficult to uncover the culprit at that time and might have spared another person's life.
Long live the clever fox.
Was this review helpful to you?
1.0 out of 5 stars Bored to tears May 3 2004
By A Customer
Format:Mass Market Paperback
This could have been a fabulous story with interesting and compelling characters. Instead, we have another self-indulgent wallow in the world of fox-hunting and so-called gracious southern living. I gave up on Rita Mae Brown several years ago when she stopped writing inventive and intriguing novels and started writing stories about talking animals. Recently I picked up Hotspur hoping some of the old zing had come back into her writing. Sadly, it hasn't.
Was this review helpful to you?
5.0 out of 5 stars "MORE...PLEASE" April 6 2004
By LJM
Format:Mass Market Paperback
I enjoyed this book, as I do all Rita Mae Brown's "Horsey" stories! I hope more are coming...fast !
Was this review helpful to you?
2.0 out of 5 stars Tedious Jan. 4 2004
By A Customer
Format:Mass Market Paperback
I have been a fan of Rita Mae Brown's for about 20 years and have read most of her books, and this was by far the most tedious. I like horses/horse people, have ridden in many disciplines and know the culture. That aspect may be interesting to people who know nothing about foxhunting, horses, etc., but I don't know that it adds much to the story, and if you don't care about such things, try another book. I think Ms. Brown should just write a book on foxhunting, as such, and get it out of her system.
The story, presumably being the murder mystery, is ho-hum. I didn't care about the deceased - they were far less vivid than even the peripheral animal characters - and since there was no real investigation to follow, I found myself wondering why I kept reading.
Oh yeah, builds character.
Was this review helpful to you?
4.0 out of 5 stars I'm so glad I found this book Nov. 13 2003
Format:Mass Market Paperback
I adored this book. It took me away to another world. It is full of violence, passion, lust, envy, anger, love and grace. The folks in the Jefferson County Hunt Club are all so complex and each one has his or her own fully fleshed out backstory and then there are the animals: Dragon the arrogant hound, Inky the black fox, wise Aunt Netty the red fox, Athena the fearless horned owl and Raleigh the devoted Doberman. The creatures in Rita Mae Browns books all have intense lives and opinions of their own and I cared about them as much if not more than the people.
Some reviewers complained that the book gets too deeply into the day to day life of the hunt but that IS what the book is about :Sister Jane's life with murder thrown in to complicate things. I loved Sister. She's a tough old girl with a mind as sharp as Jane Marple. My only regret with this entire series is that Sister is 71. I hope this series goes on for quite a while and at this rate Sister may have to live to be over 100 like Poirot did.
If you want a book that offers a complete escape from the ordinary and you want a book that takes its time to settle into the story then you'll like Hostspur.
Was this review helpful to you?
4.0 out of 5 stars Lots & lots of info on fox hunting in America! July 15 2003
Format:Hardcover
Okay, so Rita Mae indulged in her love of hunting a bit too much for some readers! I actually enjoyed learning about this, especially since I didn't know that in this country they merely chase the fox to his/her den, and try to avoid killing them. That was always the reason I avoided books on this in England, it seems an inhumane sport there on the line of cockfighting in this country. The interplay between the various animals always has me cracking up in Brown's novels. Since I have cats and dogs of my own, I am very aware they have personalities, and often consider us humans to be their pets rather than vice versa. I also remember long ago in biology they used to teach that we could not anthromorphize animals (give them human traits) like playing, but I've seen too many animals do things just for the plain fun of it rather than merely to eat and reproduce...another scientific fallacy hits the fan!
In this book, the mystery seemed more of a side plot, with the hunting information taking precedence. I am sure this is what other readers complained about. This was not a big enough flaw for me to avoid finishing the book, I actually got through it quickly because I enjoyed it. So it wasn't gory...big deal. The mystery dealt with an old cold case, that actually wasn't even a case, since no one knew what had happened to the people involved. One beautiful young woman disappears off the face of the earth, along with one of her boyfriends. Unfortunately, the inevitable change in ground and water levels, added to hunting and dogs digging brought up some old bones, proving to be human.
Sister, the head of the hunt in this area, may be older, but certainly has not lost either her riding/hunting abilities, or her concern for others.
Read more ›
Was this review helpful to you?
2.0 out of 5 stars Boring June 18 2003
By A Customer
Format:Hardcover
I found that this book got too bogged down in details that were not necessary to the story, especially what people should and shouldn't wear for foxhunting and the breeding of hunting dogs. I usually love the Sneaky Pie series, and thought I would try another by her. I was very disappointed. The characters were very likeable, especially Sister and Shaker. The mystery itself was developed as an "oh, by the way" during her account of the Wide World of Foxhunting. I also thought that if she was going to have dialogue from the animals, they should have at least played a part in solving the mystery.
Was this review helpful to you?
Want to see more reviews on this item?
Most recent customer reviews
4.0 out of 5 stars Saturation is not always enjoyable.
While I love Rita Mae Brown's ability to co-mingle the animal and human experience, I found her detailing of the incredible complexity of the fox hunting set to be more information... Read more
Published on March 2 2003 by Terry Mathews
3.0 out of 5 stars Hotspur Review
I find myself disappointed with this book. I have thoroughly enjoyed the Sneaky Pie Brown books. But this, is it a story or a guide to foxhunting? Read more
Published on Feb. 1 2003
3.0 out of 5 stars enjoyable, but not quite what I was expecting...
Fortunately for me, I'd borrowed "Hotspur" from the library. The trouble was not that the book was poorly written or that it was terribly uninteresting and banal. Read more
Published on Jan. 30 2003 by tregatt
4.0 out of 5 stars Rita Mae at her best
While spottedtowhee obviously disagrees, as a self-described conservative Southerner I prefer Rita Mae's light hearted hunting and animal descriptions to her older... Read more
Published on Dec 25 2002
1.0 out of 5 stars Where oh where is Rita Mae Brown? I miss you!
What a disappointment. Yet ANOTHER Rita Mae Brown book about ... big surprise ... foxhunting, Southern manners, and some kind of perceived aristocracy that some people fancy... Read more
Published on Dec 16 2002 by C.M.
5.0 out of 5 stars for fans of the Mrs. Murphy series
There is a small little town in Virginia that is quite quaint and magical, a place where the animals understand and speak to one another. Read more
Published on Dec 16 2002 by Harriet Klausner
Search Customer Reviews
Only search this product's reviews

Look for similar items by category


Feedback