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How to Change the World: Social Entrepreneurs and the Power of New Ideas Hardcover – Jan 6 2004


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Product Details

  • Hardcover: 336 pages
  • Publisher: Oxford University Press; 1 edition (Jan. 6 2004)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0195138058
  • ISBN-13: 978-0195138054
  • Product Dimensions: 23.6 x 15.2 x 3 cm
  • Shipping Weight: 658 g
  • Average Customer Review: 4.9 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (12 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: #467,526 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)


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This is a book about people who solve social problems on a large scale. Read the first page
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Format: Hardcover
I have nothing but praise for this book.

It contains numerous inspirational stories about individuals who have started organizations to positively change the world. It also provides insight into the practices used by Ashoka to find/fund projects with enormous transformation potential. If you're someone who reads a lot of business books (e.g. management/leadership, marketing, etc.) - like me, this book might provide you with a lot of insight and ideas for your for-profit transformation projects.

I borrowed this from my public library. Loved it so much that I purchased it and now find myself reading bits and pieces of it often.

If you like this book, I also highly recommend David Bornstein's other book called "The Price of a Dream". It is a book focused solely on the Grameen Bank and their micro-financing approach in helpling to lift people out of poverty in Bangladesh.
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Format: Hardcover
Is there hope? Can we change the world? Is globalization a benefit to the world or a curse? The western world look at globalization as a curse (the loss of wealth and power status) while the rest of the world looks at it as hope for life and quality of life. Social Entrepreneurs have these and many other issues to contend with. This a good book and highly recommended. Also, Stop Working by Rohan Hall which deals with globalization and entrepreneurship is an excellent companion book that also deals with these challenges.
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By A Customer on March 22 2004
Format: Hardcover
My takeaway from this highly inspirational book is: Dare to care. In a self-obsessed world, where the "I" reigns supreme, along comes a book that has the potential to change that for ever. I would be surprised if this book did not serve as a catalyst for all those people who are aching to leave their mark on the earth's future by altering the world for the better.

In How to Change the World, author David Bornstein presents short biographies of ordinary citizens who have cared enough to actually go out and change what is wrong in society. The nine stories of social entrepreneurs or innovators, dubbed 'transformative forces' by the author, have the power to inspire readers to want to do something. The fine examples of social entrepreneurship within the pages of this book make one realize that there is hope for the planet after all.
To quote Bornstein, "Across the world, social entrepreneurs are demonstrating new approaches to many social ills and new models to create social wealth, promote social well-being, and restore the environment." What is tremendously energizing is that so many of these change agents already exist and are moving mountains for you and me, and for our children.

The major contribution of the book is that it underlines that one doesn't have to be rich or powerful to alter the current reality. What is required is to feel empathy and concern in high doses, and to recognize and understand a problem. The stories trace how, if one is sufficiently charged, creative ideas for 'getting around' problem areas -- be it public apathy or bureaucratic indifference -- flow naturally. The hallmark of a true social entrepreneur really shines through at the next stage, when these ideas are converted into reality.
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Format: Hardcover
This book is a wonderful collection of stories about social entrepreneurs who were able to effect a change in their communities. Though not always 100% succesful, their stories illustrate that business, government, and social concerns do not have to be at odds with each other and in fact, they can often complement each other to bring about a greater good. For those in a corporate or academic setting, the chapters from this book could easily be excerpted and used as case studies for your organization. Highly recommended! If you liked this book, you should also read "Banker to the Poor" by Muhammad Yunus.
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Format: Hardcover
David Bornstein's book How to Change the World is worth reading if you
a) prefer action instead of stagnancy
b) prefer good solutions instead of persisting problems
c) prefer justice and opportunity instead of poverty and neglect, or,
d) prefer good writing, period.
Bornstein accurately writes, "Anyone who has ever dreamt of solving a problem or making a positive change in his or her environment will find encouraging and instructive stories here." He takes us around the world to visit social entrepreneurs and find out what makes these people tireless fighters for their causes.
Each profile is like an episode of VH1's Driven - we see what inspires these people, how they overcome obstacles, and why they succeed - but instead of following a pop star to a record deal and a fleet of Escalades, we watch social entrepreneurs achieve rights for people with disabilities, compassionate home care for HIV / AIDS patients, and electricity for the rural poor. Unlike celebrities or CEOs, these folks have no interest in fame and fortune. We are lucky indeed that Bornstein has taken it upon himself to describe their efforts; they are far too busy pursuing their dreams of a better world to stop and promote themselves. Many advocate endlessly for their causes, but as Bornstein points out, they have in common a willingness to work quietly, to share credit, and to plow through their own savings and time to make progress. Social entrepreneurs have a greater attachment to finding solutions than to being right, rich, or recognized.
These and other common traits are highlighted throughout the book. We see that social entrepreneurs don't start with the perfect plan, they just have a complete commitment to solving a problem.
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