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How to Kill a Judge

Franco Nero , Françoise Fabian , Damiano Damiani    Unrated   DVD

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Product Description

Product Description

International superstar Franco Nero (of DJANGO and DIE HARD 2 fame) stars as Giacomo Solaris, a director whose latest film depicts a prominent Sicilian judge as being on the Mafia’s payroll. But when the actual judge is found murdered, Solaris begins his own investigation. Has the Mob found a way to corrupt the nation’s top prosecutors? Should Solaris’ movie bear some responsibility for the killing? Or will a string of brutal assassinations lead to the most shocking conspiracy of all?

Françoise Fabian (BELLE DE JOUR, MADAME CLAUDE) co-stars in this provocative thriller from controversial writer/director Damiano Damiani (CONFESSIONS OF A POLICE CAPTAIN, A BULLET FOR THE GENERAL) that features a searing score by Riz Ortolani (MONDO CANE, KILL BILL) and stands as a startling reflection of Italy’s infamous decade of political violence.


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Most Helpful Customer Reviews on Amazon.com (beta)
Amazon.com: 3.5 out of 5 stars  4 reviews
3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
2.0 out of 5 stars Sicilian country side, power politics, misunderstood movie March 28 2007
By Pork Chop - Published on Amazon.com
Format:DVD
"Perche' si uccide un magistrato" or "How to Kill a Judge" is
somewhat of an archeological experience, much like seeing Star
Wars or another 70's movie, 30 years later. Yet, the changes
borne by society at large during that time, and as shown in the
movie to the present, are perhaps not as great as what some
people might think.

Intended commercially as a Eurofilm (Italy, Spain, Portugal,
etc.) at the time, but dubbed in English for international
release eventually, this work is somewhat of an acquired taste.
It will be appreciated by those wanting to see some imagery of
the Sicilian country side, many cities that often appear very
similar to those found in countries of Roman influence. It also
is curious in its presentation of how public institutions
function and how public servants interact in that culture.

Another, perhaps more mundane and less glamorous aspect, is how
the movie suggests a closed-mindedness of the public at large,
whose imaginations, thought processes, rational building blocks
are dominated by the mass media's output in terms of newspapers,
magazines, TV, and yes, even movies, such that, the human
subconscience is not as objective, independent, or free from
manipulation as most people would like to think. At worst, with
a controlled, or limited mass media, human minds follow in step
with Pavlov's Dog, unless they seek out new facts, new
information, new sources, and balance facts out, to
independently form accurate opinions and assessments.

In this story, a director's movie turns Sicily upside down, as
it candidly spins a biographical tale of a high ranking judge,
who is immersed in the politics of the region, with economic
interests and power struggles and lobbies to boot. The director
actually becomes part of his own movie, as the town's reality is
then changed and shaped from its repercussions on the
part-fictional tale that the audience sees.

This movie will be appreciated by those keen on following
politics and how things sometimes are played out behind the
scens, or how jaded people they think they do, in some regions
such as Southern Italy, etc.

In the extras part of the DVD, Director Damiano Damiani explains
that the movie's goal wasn't clearly understood by all critics.
Perhaps the lack of humor in this work, had a lot to do with it,
as it's pretty dry stuff.
1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Misunderstood Maestro Aug. 30 2013
By V. Risoli - Published on Amazon.com
Format:DVD|Verified Purchase
I think Damiano Damiani, the director of "How to Kill a Judge" (1974) is a masterful Italian director that is somewhat misunderstood and also a director of considerable importance now that I am seeing some of the scope of his career. One of his earlier pictures that was quite controversial, and in my opinion, quite brilliant was 1964's "The Empty Canvas" with Horst Buchholz, Bette Davis and Catherine Spaak, all giving superb performances and he followed this with another equally brilliant film, "The Witch in Love" with Richard Johnson and Rosanna Schiaffino, not as well known, but quite good. That same year, 1966, he directed a thoughtful spaghetti western, "A Bullet for the General" and later directed things like "The Day of the Owl," "How to Kill a Judge" and in 1982 he was the director of "Amityville 2: The Possession." "How to Kill a Judge" stars a frequent collaborator with Damiani, star Franco Nero, who as one of the extras in Blue Underground's wonderful edition on DVD participated in 15 minutes of interviews entitled, "The Damiano/Nero Connection" with Damiani also, of their relationship and the demise of their collaboration which is very enlightening. Other extras are an English trailer and an Italian trailer. The film, based on a story by Damiani and the screenplay by Damiani, Fulvio Gicca-Palli and Enrico Ribulsi with a memorable score by Riz Ortolani, is fascinating and reflects Italy's infamous decade of political violence. Damiani's influence on the story makes "How to Kill a Judge" important and a different artistic spin on the crime and corruption genre this could normally be relegated as a sample. Damiano has Nero play a film director whose film about the assassination of a prosecutor becomes a success when the judge is then murdered after the film is shown and sparks controversy. Francoise Fabian stars opposite Nero. The color film is presented on Blue Underground's edition in an English version and an Italian with optional subtitles. This is supposedly the first time the film is presented this way ever in America and is quite welcome. It is an artistic vision of its political undertakings that is truly fascinating and well-done. Damiano got little recognition through the years, his "The Empty Canvas" grossly miscalculated by many critics. At this writing, I am not sure his directing "Amityville 2" was such a misfire, and I am interested enough to find out for myself. "How to Kill a Judge" is the fourth film I watched that he directed and I have not been disappointed, nor uncertain of his talent, yet.
1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars This is a good film, especially if you like Franco Nero Nov. 24 2007
By Lois Epstein - Published on Amazon.com
Format:DVD|Verified Purchase
I really liked this film. It was not a work of genius, but it was very interesting and didn't bore. I happen to like Franco Nero (for those who don't know him, if you like Bruce Willis' films, you'll probably appreciate this). It's got lots of action and counterplots. Also, it's in English which helps a lot. It's not a heavy weight, but very entertaining nonetheless.
3.0 out of 5 stars Good film, but the DVD was a little lacking Jan. 27 2014
By Jonny Powers - Published on Amazon.com
Format:DVD|Verified Purchase
As others have mentioned, the film was pretty good! I really enjoyed it, not as action-filled as other italian crime films of the era, but wonderful plotting and characterization. My only big gripe is that the english subtitles do not match up with the Italian language track, but instead with the English. Now I'm no expert on Italian, but I think it's glaringly obvious that the subtitles were a rush job when they appear when nobody is speaking. Now, I can't comment on the quality of the English language track other than that Franco Nero is using his real voice (thank God), but if they were going to include an Italian language track at least give us the courtesy of translating the Italian for the subtitles. Still, all in all, a pretty decent release by Blue Underground and still worth the price tag.

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