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How to Read a Financial Report: Wringing Vital Signs Out of the Numbers Paperback – Feb 13 2004


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Product Details

  • Paperback: 216 pages
  • Publisher: Wiley; 6 edition (Feb. 13 2004)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0471478679
  • ISBN-13: 978-0471478676
  • Product Dimensions: 25 x 1.4 x 17.2 cm
  • Shipping Weight: 363 g
  • Average Customer Review: 4.2 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (11 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: #712,999 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)
  • See Complete Table of Contents

Product Description

From the Inside Flap

How to Read a Financial Report

Lurking somewhere amidst all the figures in a financial report is vitally important information about where a company has been and where it is headed. But without a guide to isolate and interpret those numbers, the dizzying array of columns and rows doesn’t add up to a hill of beans. That’s why thousands of professionals and savvy individuals have referred to this bestselling resource that shows anyone how to make sense of all those numbers.

If you’re someone who works with financial reports or needs to understand them—but have neither the time nor the need for an indepth knowledge of accounting—this book will help you cut through the maze of accounting information to find out what those numbers really mean. It steers you quickly and painlessly through the basic accounting concepts and line-by-line explanations of the basic financial statement. Complete with a visual guide that leads you through the intricacies of financial reporting, How to Read a Financial Report shows you how the three essential parts of every financial report—the balance sheet, the income statement, and the cash flow statement—fit together and what it all means to you and your company.

Updated throughout, this new edition addresses the many changes in the financial world in the past few years, including new pronouncements of the Financial Accounting Standards Board, new income tax laws, and emerging financial reporting problems. Also, all exhibits have been made easier to follow. Features updates on:

  • Tax reform
  • Recent FASB rulings
  • Depreciation methods
  • Spotting fraudulent reporting
--This text refers to the Hardcover edition.

From the Back Cover

Whether you’re just beginning to invest in the stock market or have been in the market for many years, there is one skill that can help you make better-informed investment decisions—the ability to read a financial report. With the sixth edition of How to Read a Financial Report, you’ll quickly learn how to make sense of the numbers that make up a financial report. Fully revised and updated to reflect the way today’s organizations publicly report their financial status, this book will help you understand where a company had been and where it is headed.

Inside This Book (Learn More)
First Sentence
Business mangers, lenders, and investors, quite rightly, focus on cash flows. Read the first page
Browse Sample Pages
Front Cover | Copyright | Table of Contents | Excerpt | Index | Back Cover
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Customer Reviews

4.2 out of 5 stars
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Most helpful customer reviews

2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By Sandra D. Peters on July 11 2001
Format: Paperback
As a teacher of business management, I have found the one component of training that often frustrates most students is understanding and preparing a cash flow statement, profit and loss statement and a balance sheet. This book is written in a manner which certainly simplifies the understanding of the statements, but it would definitely be a plus if the reader had some prior knowledge of basic accounting principles.
Financial statements are, for some, a challenge and one they can easily master with an understanding of basic accounting. For others with no prior knowledge of accounting, financial statements can be a nightmare. While this book will HELP TO SIMPLIFY the matter, without some previous experience the book may be quite confusing. First of all, one should at least be familiar with general accounting terminology. If you are, it will simplify this book enormously and make the learning experience more enjoyable. However, be prepared to sit down and devote your utmost concentration to the book. The subject matter is not one that can be mastered by skimming through the book in an evening or two. For many individuals, understanding financial statements is a course that takes months to completely understand. Some learn the process easily, others never master the challenge no matter how long or hard they try. The degree of success usually depends, in part, on apptitude, commitment and previous knowledge and experience of the reader.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on April 21 2004
Format: Paperback
This book is excellent in the following ways :
-succeeds in explaining in a concise (+- 100 pages) and clear way the basic principles of financial statements.
-the special format of the book is excellent in that it shows most examples and related text without having to turn the pages.
-there is enough white space, allowing you to make annotations.
Strongly adviced for anybody owning a company or for management / accounting students.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By tim747 on Dec 12 2000
Format: Hardcover
This book is great for anyone ranging from beginner to intermediate knowledge of financial reports. I have taken accounting and finance classes in college. This book tells the same things that 600 page textbooks and hours and hours of lecture can tell you, but it does so in an easy to understand and concise manner.
Most important it explains the relationships clearly between the income statement, balance sheet, and cashflow statement. This book would be great for anyone starting an education in finance or for any investor trying to broaden their knowledge base. If you invest in stocks, you should learn how to read financial statements. This book will give you some much needed knowledge that you can use as you scour for companies to invest in.
This author takes pride in his writing. John A. Tracy is a professor of accounting, but his knack for concise explanations and the clear use of the English language is evident throughout.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By tim747 on Dec 12 2000
Format: Paperback
This book is great for anyone ranging from beginner to intermediate knowledge of financial reports. I have taken accounting and finance classes in college. This book tells the same things that 600 page textbooks and hours and hours of lecture can tell you, but it does so in an easy to understand and concise manner.
Most important it explains the relationships clearly between the income statement, balance sheet, and cashflow statement. This book would be great for anyone starting an education in finance or for any investor trying to broaden their knowledge base. If you invest in stocks, you should learn how to read financial statements. This book will give you some much needed knowledge that you can use as you scour for companies to invest in.
This author takes pride in his writing. John A. Tracy is a professor of accounting, but his knack for concise explanations and the clear use of the English language is evident throughout.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Ian F Ripper on June 2 2000
Format: Hardcover
As an MBA student and a director of a small business, I doubt I have read a more useful book. Together with his 'Budgeting a la Carte', John Tracy cuts to the heart of company financials in a very clear and readable manner. I never thought I'd sit up and get excited about this subject, but these 2 books really shed light on the nuts and bolts of company finance without being long winded or dull. A 'must read' for anybody trying to get to grips with this subject and any small business owner not trained in accounting. Well done Mr Tracy!
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on April 18 1999
Format: Paperback
John Tracy outdoes even Benjamin Graham's "The Interpretation of Financial Statements" with this work, which makes basic financial analysis accessible to anyone who wants to take the time to learn about it. Beginners should not expect to pick up everything this deceptively brief book has to offer on first reading. But the text's thoughtful layout fosters quicker learning than would otherwise be possible. This is an indispensable guide for anyone who wishes to buy securities but lacks formal training in financial analysis.
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