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How to Read a Financial Report: Wringing Vital Signs Out of the Numbers Paperback – Feb 13 2004


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Product Details

  • Paperback: 216 pages
  • Publisher: Wiley; 6 edition (Feb. 13 2004)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0471478679
  • ISBN-13: 978-0471478676
  • Product Dimensions: 24.9 x 16.3 x 1.8 cm
  • Shipping Weight: 363 g
  • Average Customer Review: 4.2 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (11 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: #495,743 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)
  • See Complete Table of Contents


Inside This Book (Learn More)
First Sentence
Business mangers, lenders, and investors, quite rightly, focus on cash flows. Read the first page
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Front Cover | Copyright | Table of Contents | Excerpt | Index | Back Cover
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Customer Reviews

4.2 out of 5 stars
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Most helpful customer reviews

2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on April 21 2004
Format: Paperback
This book is excellent in the following ways :
-succeeds in explaining in a concise (+- 100 pages) and clear way the basic principles of financial statements.
-the special format of the book is excellent in that it shows most examples and related text without having to turn the pages.
-there is enough white space, allowing you to make annotations.
Strongly adviced for anybody owning a company or for management / accounting students.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By Sandra D. Peters on July 11 2001
Format: Paperback
As a teacher of business management, I have found the one component of training that often frustrates most students is understanding and preparing a cash flow statement, profit and loss statement and a balance sheet. This book is written in a manner which certainly simplifies the understanding of the statements, but it would definitely be a plus if the reader had some prior knowledge of basic accounting principles.
Financial statements are, for some, a challenge and one they can easily master with an understanding of basic accounting. For others with no prior knowledge of accounting, financial statements can be a nightmare. While this book will HELP TO SIMPLIFY the matter, without some previous experience the book may be quite confusing. First of all, one should at least be familiar with general accounting terminology. If you are, it will simplify this book enormously and make the learning experience more enjoyable. However, be prepared to sit down and devote your utmost concentration to the book. The subject matter is not one that can be mastered by skimming through the book in an evening or two. For many individuals, understanding financial statements is a course that takes months to completely understand. Some learn the process easily, others never master the challenge no matter how long or hard they try. The degree of success usually depends, in part, on apptitude, commitment and previous knowledge and experience of the reader.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Entrepreneur to be on Jan. 10 2007
Format: Paperback
The book is perfect fit for it's audience. The articulate the relationships between the three financial reports are critical knowledge to understand the function of the financial reports.

Love it.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Naeem on June 15 2001
Format: Paperback
John Tracy does an excellent job of reviewing the basics of reading a financial report. His treatment of how the Balance Sheet, Income, and Cash Flow Statements are related to each other is simple and to the point. He also discusses how various depreciation and inventory methods impact the financial reports. The book is easy to read and well organized. Anyone who is new to financial reports or who wants to brush up on financial reports since their accounting days in college should find this book useful.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By tim747 on Dec 12 2000
Format: Hardcover
This book is great for anyone ranging from beginner to intermediate knowledge of financial reports. I have taken accounting and finance classes in college. This book tells the same things that 600 page textbooks and hours and hours of lecture can tell you, but it does so in an easy to understand and concise manner.
Most important it explains the relationships clearly between the income statement, balance sheet, and cashflow statement. This book would be great for anyone starting an education in finance or for any investor trying to broaden their knowledge base. If you invest in stocks, you should learn how to read financial statements. This book will give you some much needed knowledge that you can use as you scour for companies to invest in.
This author takes pride in his writing. John A. Tracy is a professor of accounting, but his knack for concise explanations and the clear use of the English language is evident throughout.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By tim747 on Dec 12 2000
Format: Paperback
This book is great for anyone ranging from beginner to intermediate knowledge of financial reports. I have taken accounting and finance classes in college. This book tells the same things that 600 page textbooks and hours and hours of lecture can tell you, but it does so in an easy to understand and concise manner.
Most important it explains the relationships clearly between the income statement, balance sheet, and cashflow statement. This book would be great for anyone starting an education in finance or for any investor trying to broaden their knowledge base. If you invest in stocks, you should learn how to read financial statements. This book will give you some much needed knowledge that you can use as you scour for companies to invest in.
This author takes pride in his writing. John A. Tracy is a professor of accounting, but his knack for concise explanations and the clear use of the English language is evident throughout.
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
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