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Hugo

4.4 out of 5 stars 43 customer reviews

Price: CDN$ 59.02
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Hugo [Blu-ray]
CDN$ 23.73
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  • The Adventures of Tintin (Bilingual) [Blu-ray + DVD + Digital HD] (Sous-titres français)
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Total price: CDN$ 98.91
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Product Details

  • Actors: Chloë Grace Moretz
  • Format: Color
  • Language: English
  • Subtitles: English, French, Portuguese, Spanish
  • Region: Region A/1
  • Number of discs: 2
  • Average Customer Review: 4.4 out of 5 stars 43 customer reviews
  • ASIN: B003Y5H5HE
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: #60,363 in DVD (See Top 100 in DVD)
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Customer Reviews

Top Customer Reviews

Format: DVD
I read The Invention of Hugo Cabret when it was first published - and loved it. Usually I don't give the film version a chance when that happens. (For example, I did not watch Angela's Ashes, nor did I watch Water for Elephants. For some reason, I gave Hugo a chance.)

Wow. I'm glad I did. This film is not only very faithful to the book - but sets the book in motion - which is, of course, entirely appropriate.

The choice of actors is perfect. The sets are fantastical and quite entirely beautiful. The photography is stunning. Martin Scorcese has outdone himself here.

This film picks up quite a pace and keeps you on the edge of your seat from then on. But it has a very worthwhile message, too.

Just to give you a sense of my context, I have a few film favourites that have been made (primarily) for children:
Into the West, with: Gabriel Byrne, Ellen Barkin, Ciarán Fitzgerald, Rúaidhrí Conroy, David Kelly
The Secret of Roan Inish, with: Jeni Courtney, Mick Lally, Eileen Colgan, Richard Sheridan, John Lynch, Susan Lynch, Cillian Byrne
The Three Lives of Thomasina, with: Patrick McGoohan, Susan Hampshire, Karen Dotrice, Matthew Garber, and the voice of Elspeth March as Thomasina the cat.

Hugo is now on my list.
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Format: DVD
This film is a love letter to the early days of cinema. It is wonderfully acted, very touching, and you'll learn some history along the way. It does not have a lot of action, but the views are breathtaking, the subject matter compelling (though it might not hold interest for most younger children), and a great chance for director Martin Scorsese to make the dream fantasy film he was always wanted to make. I highly recommend it!
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Format: DVD
Hugo(released Nov/11) stars Ben Kingsley as George Melies,Asa Butterfield as Hugo Cabret,Chloë Grace Moretz as Isabelle,Sacha Baron Cohen as Inspector Gustave,Jude Law as Hugo's father,Christopher Lee as Monsieur Labisse,and an astounding supporting cast of other actors.This is a nostalgic look back at film making's earliest days and how a young boy is the catalyst for one its most honoured creator's deserved return to the limelight.Beautifully photographed and set decorated,this piece almost immediately brings you into the film titled young boys life and world,and from there the adventure never stops building to its inevitable climax.
The story takes place,I would guess,in the late 20s.Hugo is a young boy living with his father,who works in a museum.Hugo has become a tinkerer of sorts,like his father,and both work together on repairing and bringing back to life an automaton Hugo's father claimed from the museum's basement.One night his father is fatally caught in a conflagration at the museum and Hugo is forced to go and live with his inebriated uncle.The uncle tends the clock works at the Gare Montparnasse,the central train station in Paris.And when his uncle is away,which is quite often,it is left up to Hugo to pick up the slack.Eventually his uncle is found dead,and he is left an orphan.
When Hugo has down time he works away at the automaton.He regularly scrounges parts from an old man who runs a small toy store in the train station.One day the man catches the boy and Hugo is forced to empty his pockets.Among the items the man confiscates is Hugo's diary which his father kept while working on the automaton.That night Hugo follows the man home and speaks to his young god-daughter,who promises to keep her father from burning the book and to help him get it back.
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Format: Blu-ray
I didn't rush out to see Hugo in the theater because of the 3D aspect, but I wanted to see it before the Oscars. So I eagerly sat down to watch the 2D Blu-ray version when my review copy arrived this week.

When you think of Martin Scorsese, what comes to mind? My favorite Scorsese films are The Departed, Taxi Driver, Shutter Island, Gangs of New York and Goodfellas, but it would be easy to make the argument for Casino or Raging Bull to be on that list. Many of his films have moments of intense violence, but all of them illustrate how good he is at character studies. Hugo is a family film with no violence, but its characters are strong and I came away feeling like I knew the people being portrayed.

The opening scene sweeps us through a train station in 1930s Paris. We learn that Hugo (Asa Butterfield) hides away in a giant clock tower and winds the clock. In fact, he's a genius when it comes to repairing machinery of all types. We see his father die in a flashback sequence and understand why Hugo is striving to repair a rusty old automaton that he worked on with his father. He has to stay hidden or risk being sent to the orphanage, so finding food and drink means he has to steal in order to survive. But there's never a sense that he's a criminal.

Hugo gets caught trying to steal cogs from a local toymaker (Ben Kingsley), but finds a friend when he meets Isabelle (Chloe Grace Moretz); the toymaker's granddaughter. The two spend a lot of time together. Her grandfather forbids her from seeing films, but Hugo sneaks her in to see a Buster Keaton movie at the local cinema.

The images of Paris as seen from the high clock tower are breathtaking.
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