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IBM Cognos Tm1 Cookbook [Paperback]

Ankit Garg
4.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (3 customer reviews)
Price: CDN$ 77.19 & FREE Shipping. Details
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Inside This Book (Learn More)
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Front Cover | Copyright | Table of Contents | Excerpt | Index | Back Cover
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Customer Reviews

4.0 out of 5 stars
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Most helpful customer reviews
5.0 out of 5 stars Great way to start TM1 Dec 21 2013
Format:Paperback|Verified Purchase
I bought this book, because the recommendations said that it was not advanced enough. Only real tutorial that I have found so far. You want to learn TM1, buy it and work your way through
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3.0 out of 5 stars IBM Cognos TM1 Cookbook March 5 2012
Format:Paperback
Having recently taken on a TM1 Administrator role I have found this book to be useful at times. As an existing TM1 user with no IT Support this book has been helpful in certain areas on sucessfully creating Cubes, creating Dimensions and TI Processes. One thing I found a bit difficult to follow was the Rules & Feeder section, the book doesn't actually help you out if something doesn't feed properly. I think that this book is more for people who have TM1 experience rather than starting off from scratch. TM1 users and Developers who use the system every day will find this book helpful. I intend to use the receipes in this Cookbook to further develop my knowledge.
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Format:Paperback
Ok, I have not read the official IBM Cognos TM1 documentation, so I cannot make a first hand comparison between this book and that. Other reviewers have suggested that the book offers little different.

Garg's offering might seem to naively and initially portray TM1 to be in part a souped up spreadsheet. Several sections show a typical spreadsheet layout, with a table populated with data. But TM1 goes far beyond being a pure spreadsheet. Crucially, it has scripts that run in the backend to hook up with the TM1 Data Server. The latter contains what IBM simply calls 'cubes'. An inspired choice of terminology. Compact, with a simple metaphoric visualisation. A cube is considered to be business data in some type of multi-dimensional format. This is not the lowest form of data. The cube is derived from underlying data sets residing in, for example, a CRM source database. The Data Server goes out to this and constructs a cube.

The various user interfaces that the book spends much/most of its time on are the views that TM1 lets you have for the cubes. Kudos to IBM for eschewing complex jargon. If I do seem to be emphasising this, it is because notation and terminology can and probably will affect how you use a software package. The simpler and more self evident the jargon, the easier it is for you to mentally build upon it and to leverage off the user interface.

The user interface shows how to make a cube. Quite different from a traditional relational database approach of making interrelated tables and using standard normal forms. Arguably, IBM's approach with the cube may be more intuitive for the business user unversed in database theory. In and of itself, you might want to carefully peruse this book, to see if this approach is easier for you. Where possibly you can apply your business expert knowledge in an easier way.
Was this review helpful to you?
Most Helpful Customer Reviews on Amazon.com (beta)
Amazon.com: 2.8 out of 5 stars  5 reviews
5 of 5 people found the following review helpful
2.0 out of 5 stars Not so much of a cookbook as a basic guide Dec 28 2011
By James Webber - Published on Amazon.com
Format:Paperback
I was expecting great things from this book.

The other cookbooks I have read in this series had really good technical recipes (like the Congos Report studio one IBM Cognos 8 Report Studio Cookbook).

However if you have read the IBM TM1 user guides and done a little surfing on TM1 I don't think this book will give you any major insight into TM1. I certainly felt that I knew at least 90% if not all of the information in this cookbook. I expect this is a good book for learning TM1 from scratch, perhaps cookbook is a misleading title.

I was also disappointed because I think very highly of Wim Gielis (one of the contributing authors) ([...] and [...]) didn't see many off his good hints and tricks in the book.

Hoping the official guide will be better IBM Cognos TM1 The Official Guide
2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Poor book title; A-Z Coverage of TM1 tools. Feb. 25 2012
By Ned R. - Published on Amazon.com
Format:Paperback
What I like about this book:
- A-Z coverage of TM1 tools
- A good book for people switching to tm1 tool from another planning platform (such as, EP or SAP BPC)

Suggestions for Improvement:
- Change title to something like, "Introduction to TM1."
- Upload tutorial data files (csv or Excel) to the publisher website, so reader can finish tutorials
- Describe in table format TM1 menus and toolbars where applicable
3 of 4 people found the following review helpful
1.0 out of 5 stars Too Basic Jan. 5 2012
By Edgar Gomez - Published on Amazon.com
Format:Paperback
My expectation on this book is very disappointing.
Most of the content is copied form a standard training content of TM1. A bit of rip off to write this book.
You can easily download the reference materials and rules manual for free and has better content and depth.

Other Deficiency
1) None of the new features of TM1 9.5.2 are explained or showed such as the new rules function.
2) There is no point showing integrating with Cognos 8 when it is outdated and when Cognos 10 has been out for more than 1 year

Overall this book is not worth it as you can get more details in youtube, forums and IBM manuals
4.0 out of 5 stars cube = intuitive way to encapsulate and analyse business data Feb. 26 2012
By W Boudville - Published on Amazon.com
Format:Paperback
Ok, I have not read the official IBM Cognos TM1 documentation, so I cannot make a first hand comparison between this book and that. Other reviewers have suggested that the book offers little different.

Garg's offering might seem to naively and initially portray TM1 to be in part a souped up spreadsheet. Several sections show a typical spreadsheet layout, with a table populated with data. But TM1 goes far beyond being a pure spreadsheet. Crucially, it has scripts that run in the backend to hook up with the TM1 Data Server. The latter contains what IBM simply calls 'cubes'. An inspired choice of terminology. Compact, with a simple metaphoric visualisation. A cube is considered to be business data in some type of multi-dimensional format. This is not the lowest form of data. The cube is derived from underlying data sets residing in, for example, a CRM source database. The Data Server goes out to this and constructs a cube.

The various user interfaces that the book spends much/most of its time on are the views that TM1 lets you have for the cubes. Kudos to IBM for eschewing complex jargon. If I do seem to be emphasising this, it is because notation and terminology can and probably will affect how you use a software package. The simpler and more self evident the jargon, the easier it is for you to mentally build upon it and to leverage off the user interface.

The user interface shows how to make a cube. Quite different from a traditional relational database approach of making interrelated tables and using standard normal forms. Arguably, IBM's approach with the cube may be more intuitive for the business user unversed in database theory. In and of itself, you might want to carefully peruse this book, to see if this approach is easier for you. Where possibly you can apply your business expert knowledge in an easier way.

This is something I think the book does not emphasise enough. If you read this book, at some point, step back from what are low level details about a given set of steps in the user interface and consider the bigger significance of what TM1 lets you do. That clever avoidance of explicit relational ideas can really expand the audience and potential usefulness of TM1.
0 of 1 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars IBM Cognos TM1 Cookbook March 5 2012
By JuicyBerry40 - Published on Amazon.com
Format:Paperback
Having recently taken on a TM1 Administrator role I have found this book to be useful at times. As an existing TM1 user with no IT Support this book has been helpful in certain areas on sucessfully creating Cubes, creating Dimensions and TI Processes. One thing I found a bit difficult to follow was the Rules & Feeder section, the book doesn't actually help you out if something doesn't feed properly. I think that this book is more for people who have TM1 experience rather than starting off from scratch. TM1 users and Developers who use the system every day will find this book helpful. I intend to use the receipes in this Cookbook to further develop my knowledge.
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