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Icons of Adventure (Terror of Tongs, Devil:Ship Pirates, Pirates Blood River, Stranglers of Bombay) (Bilingual) [Import]

Christopher Lee , Yvonne Monlaur , Anthony Bushell , Don Sharp    DVD
4.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (1 customer review)
List Price: CDN$ 26.99
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Frequently Bought Together

Icons of Adventure  (Terror of Tongs, Devil:Ship Pirates, Pirates Blood River, Stranglers of Bombay) (Bilingual) [Import] + The Icons of Suspense Collection: Hammer Films (Stop Me Before I Kill! / Cash on Demand / The Snorkel / Maniac / Never Take Candy from a Stranger / These Are the Damned)
Price For Both: CDN$ 37.64


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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars ICONS OF ADVENTURE March 11 2013
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Merveilleux coffret et surprise 3 titres sont en français. Le seul en anglais c'est celui en noir et blanc mais avec sous-titres français. Un autre bon DVD a posséder.
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Amazon.com: 4.5 out of 5 stars  23 reviews
39 of 41 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars NICE RELEASE OF EXCEEDINGLY RARE HAMMERS June 13 2008
By Neo Noircat - Published on Amazon.com
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Hammer Studios is known for its particular brand of horror films, but in the early sixties they also ventured into the realm of adventure. Four of those titles are included here. PIRATES OF BLOOD RIVER is a swashbuckling potboiler, with Christopher Lee as a one-eyed pirate, and Sinbad's Kerwin Matthews as the persecuted hero who saves the town that rejected him from treasure seeking mauraders.

DEVIL-SHIPS PIRATES has a clever premise, a Spanish privateer that sailed with the Armada runs ashore near a small and remote British town and terrorizes the populace, tricking the hapless villagers into believing (at least for a while) that the Armada defeated the British navy and the rest of England is now occupied by the victorious Spaniards. This clever IT HAPPENED HERE touch from screenwriter Jimmy Sangster makes DEVIL-SHIP special, as does Christopher Lee's performance as the absolute nastiest villian he's ever played in his long and distinguished career.

Two dark masterpieces are on the second disk. THE TERROR OF THE TONGS, with Christopher Lee as the evil head of the Red Dragon Tongs, is set in nineteenth century Hong Kong. When the Red Dragons murder a British sea captain's teenaged daughter, they unleash a reckoning they never imagined.

The second film on disk two is STRANGLERS OF BOMBAY, the "true" story of the Kali Cult in India. This film is the only black and white entry in this set and it stars no major Hammer actors, yet you'll be rivited by a suspenseful story that really draws you in. Though this was made decades ago, be warned, STRANGLERS is not for the faint of heart. This story was "remade" in the 1980s with James Ivory behind the camera and Pierce Brosnan in front of it, titled THE DECEIVERS.

Jimmy Sangster, Hammer's premier screenwriter, offers commentary, along with a Hammer film historian. Trailers are included, along with some wacky supplemental material. The widescreen transfers are excellent on all four films. Kuddos to Sony Home Video for this release. Now, guys, when are you going to release THE GORGON on DVD?
24 of 25 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Hammer films long awaited titles released on DVD! May 3 2008
By DR. FOREMAN - Published on Amazon.com
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Any fan of Hammer films and/or Christopher Lee cannot wait to snatch up this rare item. Be aware casual Hammer Film fans these are not Horror films but action/adventure. Many familiar Hammer actors and directors. So if you are a completist of the Golden Age of Hammer like myself,snatch up this DVD collection.
27 of 29 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Glad to see "The Stranglers" on DVD finally! June 19 2008
By Patrick W. Crabtree - Published on Amazon.com
I wanted to specifically point out my enthisiasm for "The Stranglers of Bombay". I've been trying to acquire this great 1960 Hammer film for a long time and, finally, it's now available!

This movie is shot in black-and-white and runs for 80 minutes. As I mentioned, this is a Hammer Studios film. It was directed by Terrence Fisher and conveys a sort of story about the Thuggees of India, a murderous religious cult.

Guy Rolfe plays Captain Harry Lewis, a seasoned British officer who trys to persuade the East India Company to investigate a situation where people have disappeared -- he is ignored. Lewis is replaced by an incompetent for all his troubles so he investigates the matter on his own. George Pastell plays the role of the High Priest of Kali.

The big picture is that this is yet another story of British mis-management of one of its colonies, in this case, India.

This is a very rare film and, for this movie alone, this movie set is worth the price. Highly recommended!
11 of 11 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Icons of Adventure June 27 2008
By Hattie Shepherd - Published on Amazon.com
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I'm literally speechless! The set is so beautiful- superb prints! We finally get to see the pirates in the ambush pit - the british censor took it out of the prints showed at the movies in England, so that was a first! Tongs was the biggest pleasure, having only seen elderly,faded prints on rare occasions on TV -now we have it in all its glory, and with out mate Jimmy Sangster's comentary too.What more could we ask for!
Thanks America for cherishing them for us and letting us have them back again.Congrats to all concerned, and thanks to Amazon for their safe and quick delivery
8 of 8 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Are Christopher Lee and Michael Ripper really icons of adventure? July 25 2008
By Trevor Willsmer - Published on Amazon.com
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That caveat aside, this is a rather splendid set of four of Hammer's adventure films of the Sixties with a nice array of extras - including audio commentaries on all four films - and trailers to compliment the fine widescreen transfers.

The Pirates of Blood River is infamous as the pirate movie that takes place entirely on land (well, you do at least see a ship at sea from the shore). Kerwin Matthews is the rebellious youth trying to bring moderation to the fiercely religious island community of exiles who finds an even bigger problem when Christopher Lee and his band of pirates land on the island in search of the founding fathers' hidden treasure, and aren't too bothered by how many villagers have to die finding it. Sporting an eye patch, a good accent that strangely makes him sound like a French Max Von Sydow and a henchman called Hench, Lee is a villain so cool he doesn't even sweat, and if the movie isn't a great high adventure it's an entertaining programmer. A problem picture for Hammer, who couldn't decide whether to go for a restrictive X or a general U certificate, it went back and forth with the censors several times (the main casualty was the amount of blood in the water after the piranhas lunch on one character). None of the censor trims have been restored here, but the film boasts a good 2.35:1 widescreen transfer.

The Devil-Ship Pirates is an entertaining pirate romp from Hammer that's a part of studio legend. Hammer built a Spanish pirate ship for the film planning to reuse it on other pictures. Unfortunately, it was a death trap - the woodwork was so bad the decks would give way under people's feet and it was so unseaworthy that even in calm landlocked waters the thing would capsize, nearly drowning cast and crew. Things got so bad that even the parsimonious Hammer burnt it for real in the final scenes!
The film itself isn't as good as the story behind it, but it's a neat premise - the crew of Christopher Lee's Spanish privateer convince a small village that the Spanish Armada defeated the British to give them time to make repairs - well executed and an entertaining enough way to fill an hour-and-a-half on a Sunday afternoon.

It's all too easy to understand why Terror of the Tongs is such a rarity now - forget the political incorrectness, the most terrible thing about it is the sheer tedium. One brief scene of mild off-screen torture, a couple of badly choreographed fights and a LOT of sitting around talking to French or Irish actors pretending to be Chinese makes for a very, very long 80 minutes. Lee is mostly inert throughout the movie and has little to do, leading lady's Yvonne Monlaur's thick French accent and bad makeup make a mockery of her every scene and a plot which somehow manages to mix revenge, opium ("the pipe of dreams"), brothels, corruption, secret societies and murder and do nothing of even the remotest interest with them leaves you wondering how many irreplaceable body cells died while you were watching. The only pluses are Arthur Grant's photography and Bernard Robinson's typically beautiful production design and sets, both better than anything you'll see in even the best of Harry Allan Towers' superior Fu Manchu series, but other than that the most memorable thing in the film for me was the curious fact that, made up as a Chinaman, Marne Maitland looks just like my dog - and I don't think she'd be flattered by the comparison!

Only the existence of 'George and Mildred' stops this from being one of Hammer's very, very worst. Dull, but don't let that put you off the set - it's more than worth it for the other films.

The Stranglers of Bombay is much more like it. Directed by Terence Fisher at the peak of his powers, it's slightly more accurate than expected - some research has been done into the Thugs, which is more than can be said for Gunga Din - but is still closer in tone to Victorian melodrama than history. Guy Rolfe is typically laid back as the officer trying to persuade the apathetic East India Company to investigate a series of disappearances only to be ignored and ultimately replaced by the a particularly idiotic candidate who went to the right school. Investigating on his own, he soon comes up against the followers of Kali, with results that should entertain anyone who likes Fu Manchu and his ilk. It's particularly interesting just how critical the film is of the British mismanagement of India - although more an Old Boys' network here than the otherwise unemployable dregs of the Empire that made up the Honorable Company's ranks overseas in reality, rather than agents of civilisation, their concern is purely with the bottom line. It's a fast-paced 80 minutes with many of the usual 'British' suspects - George Pastell, Roger Delgado, Tutte Lemkow and Marne Maitland - in black face in the supporting cast, and better production values than you might expect from the obviously low budget.

It's strange that the film is such a rarity since there are many more politically incorrect films still in circulation: maybe its down to the controversy that greeted it on its first release. Nonetheless, well worth a look if it crosses your path, especially in a good widescreen transfer in its original 'StrangloScope!'
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