Auto boutiques-francophones Simple and secure cloud storage summerbaby Cook Kindle Music Deals Store Tools minions Cycling

Customer Reviews

17
4.3 out of 5 stars
5 star
7
4 star
8
3 star
2
2 star
0
1 star
0
Your rating(Clear)Rate this item


There was a problem filtering reviews right now. Please try again later.

2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
on September 5, 2011
This DVD set contains three sci-fi classics from Toho (meaning "Eastern Treasure" in Japanese). "Mothra" tells the story of a joint expedition of Rolithican and Japanese scientists exploring an island and discovering many curious things, including two women only a foot high. Unscrupulous expedition leader Clark Nelson abducts the women and puts them in a vaudeville show. But their sweet singing contains a telepathic cry for help to Mothra, the gigantic moth worshiped as a goddess by the island people. Mothra seeks the women in Tokyo and later in Rolithica. In "Battle in Outer Space," aliens able to enslave a few human beings to do their evil biddings, plan to conquer the Earth, but the nations of the world unite to launch a counter offensive to foil the invasion. But my favourite of the three movies would definitely have to be "The H-Man," which is a typical story of the fear of nuclear radiation but with a twist: instead of the usual overgrown monster trying to level Tokyo (Godzilla), this time the monster turns out to be a living liquid (which looks like spilled shampoo) that can dissolve a person on contact. The story opens with the Tokyo police looking for an elusive small-time thief who apparently decided to discard his clothes and personal effects to run naked in the cold, rainy night. A scientist believes instead that there might have been something in the rain that would have dissolved the thief. The police cannot believe this story, nor the accounts of fishermen being treated for radiation sickness claiming to have boarded a derelict ship where three of them were attacked by liquid entities that dissolved their victims on contact. After conducting experiments by exposing frogs to radiation, scientists are finally able to convince the authority that Japan has a deadly problem. How will Japan rid itself of these unwelcomed invaders? I thought it was a good price to pay for these three movies, and you even have the option of listening to either the English dubbed version or the original Japanese language version with English subtitles for each of these movies.
0CommentWas this review helpful to you?YesNoSending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
on March 5, 2004
This is the first Mothra movie I saw a a child and remains one of my favorites. I like the plot where the girls get kidnapped from Infant Island by the greedy bad guys, they sing for Mothra, and Mothra of course comes to their rescue. I have never seen the new Mothra movies, nor do I care to - I prefer to honor the oldies but goodies.
There is another fabulous Mothra movie for which I am seeking but cannot seem to find. Unfortunately, I do not know the exact title. It is a Mothra v Godzilla (Godzilla v Mothra?) movie where there is a third (flying) monster in it as well. It is NOT the 1964 Godzilla v Mothra movie that is currently advertised on the Internet for sale (where Mothra dies but has offspring that team up against Godzilla), however some parts of it sound similar and it must have been made around the same time.
The twins are also in the version I am seeking and sing the Mothra song longer, more beautifully and with better stereo sound than the "Mothra" movie featured here. They live in a dollhouse built especially for them while captured, wear beautiful outfits and walk past a tropical fish tank while singing their Mothra song. As a girl, I enjoyed seeing Mothra and Godzilla fight, however I loved and watched the movies expecially because of the twins and their song.
Anyway, the plot, from what I recall is:
There is an earthquake and/or hurricaine, the Mothra egg on the Island is exposed. It is discovered and stolen from the Island, the twins are kidnapped, Godzilla is awakened, a third flying monster comes into play somehow (I don't recall the details)... Eventually, all three monsters are fighting and Mothra almost gets defeated. He retreats, but returns to team up with either Godzilla against the flying monster -or- with the flying monster against Godzilla (I don't remember). He saves the planet and leaves with the girls, of course.
Unlike the 1964 Mothra vs Godzilla version currently featured on the Internet, Mothra does not die, there are no Mothra offspring...etc. It is definately not the same movie.
Does anyone know the version I am describing? What is the title? Is it for sale? I definately want this one in my collection. Thank you!!!!!
0CommentWas this review helpful to you?YesNoSending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
on November 16, 2003
After a ship hits a reef and goes down near the atomic testing area, the worst is feared, but four surviving sailors are rescued, healthy and with no trace of radiation at all!
This leads to an expedition to Infant Island, part of East Biru, and it's led by the Rolithican, Clark Nelson, a slimy, unsavory character with his face twisted in a sneer. Japanese members of the expedition include Dr. Harada, the linguist and ethnologist Dr. Chujo, and a reporter named Vin Chun, nicknamed the Bulldog because he never lets go of a story. They discover a pair of foot-high grown girls and decide to leave them in peace. However, the greedy Nelson kidnaps them for his personal gain. This leads to Mothra awakened to rescue them. Despite entreaties by Chujo, Vin Chun, and his colleague Michi, Nelson refuses to let them go and puts them to work in The Secret Fairies Show, which plays to packed houses.
Compared to others in the Toho monsters canon, the production values are more topnotch than later entries, in regards to the brass band and the crowd seeing the expedition ship off, as well as the scenes of destruction. However, there are some shots where it's clear that some of the tanks are toys, as the soldiers on them are clearly plastic soldiers, and there is a scene when Nelson seizes the twins and it's clear he's holding dummies in his hand. The moth version of Mothra is a visual triumph, with its colourful markings. A pity that for the majority of the movie, we only see a dingy brown caterpillar smashing up Tokyo.
But the charm of this movie clearly go to the twin fairies, played by the Peanuts, those twin Japanese pop singers of the 1960's, Yumi and Emi Ito. They spend the majority of the movie chanting for Mothra, wearing kitschy costumes, and just overall being cute.
It's also clear that the Rolithicans are based on Americans. The syllables and stresses on them are identical, but the existence of New Kirk City confirms it. Another sobering thing is the Rolithican promising to help Japan, and it's with their atomic heat ray. Typical! Always with weapons and not diplomacy!
Two major actors come out here. One is Takashi Shimura, best known as the lead samurai in The Seven Samurai. He's the editor of Nitto Shimbun (Nitto Newspaper) here. The other is comedian Franky Sakai (Vin Chun), who later appeared in the Shogun miniseries. His personable smile, comical scenes, and spunky attitude makes him a standout character here.
I'm going by the American dubbing here, but the chubby Shinji, who is about twelve or thirteen, is Dr. Chujo's brother. Now, Chujo is a man in his early forties, more the age of Shinji's father, and he acts like Shinji's father in one scene. Dubbing goof?
One of the better Toho monster movies which is the debut of Mothra and the twin fairies. However, the moral of the avarice of one leading to widespread mayhem at the cost of innocent people puts this a notch above others in the series.
0CommentWas this review helpful to you?YesNoSending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
on July 9, 2002
A giant moth flips its lid and attacks Japan. If Walt Disney ventured into the realm of Japanese sci-fi, this movie could have been the result. Chuckle-headed, camp humor is evident, but another wacky monster fest is not the director's real purpose. The emphasis is on a juvenile fantasy story that features "The Peanuts," petite female fairies. Tinkerbell's cousins. Twins, no less. (If this was a fantasy film of another kind, the mathematical possibilities would be endless). The Peanuts serve as high priestesses to Mothra, a primitive deity. Their haunting rendition of Mothra's theme song holds a special place in the Japanese sci-fi hall of fame. When ruthless men kidnap the girls, Mothra follows them to Japan. Mothra first appears as a giant caterpillar that scoots across the countryside like an electric train. The most thrilling part of this epic is the attack on Tokyo. In the midst of the fiery destruction, the caterpillar attaches itself to Tokyo Tower, and spins a huge cocoon. Atomic heat ray machines fail to destroy the cocoon, and a giant moth emerges. The wind from Mothra's flapping wings gives off typhoon type wind. Buildings crumble, fire rages, and vehicles whip around like toys. Of course, the cars and trucks really are toys, but don't get technical. The military fights back with tanks, rockets, and planes, but to no effect. Considering the lousy track record of the Japanese military in these monster epics, the government of Japan might want to re-think its military resources. The special effects reflect the limitations of the budget and the era. Don't expect computer-generated razzle-dazzle. Suspend disbelief and go with the flow. Good for kids under seven and hard core Japanese sci-fi fans. ;-)
0CommentWas this review helpful to you?YesNoSending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
TOP 100 REVIEWERon September 26, 2000
That is correct don't bring your date, because they say that a Mothra is attracted by a flame. Maybe that is why those two pint-sized cuties got Mothra to go to Tokyo. Oh, all right it was telepathy. Mothra unlike some other monsters we know will worm her way into your heart. Anyway Tokyo is always trying to defend its self with military solutions. Some claim that Mothra was "Shot in Tohoscope" However they never came near her Tohoscope. Did anyone think of surrounding the island with giant mothballs?

Mothra meets the standard Japanese Sci-Fi formula of having the standard good guys and bad guys and dumb guys and an environmental theme.

Personally I thing Mothra was lucky that Rodan "Rodan - Dubbed in English ASIN: 6302658888"did not catch her in the larva state. You know what they say about the early bird.

Two things to keep in mind. This is not the last of Mothra and the soundtrack is for sale.

Mothra: The Best from 1961-1998 [IMPORT] [SOUNDTRACK] ASIN: B00000I47H
0CommentWas this review helpful to you?YesNoSending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
on February 21, 2003
The original Mothra is an interesting movie. It relies on human drama much more than the average kaiju movie that I've seen, but still manages to keep up the monster action enough to keep your attention. Unfortunately, the monster action isn't very exciting. After smashing a dam and a building or two, the catapillar spins a cocoon around Tokyo tower, only to be "fried" by a new military weapon. But, after it hatches into a giant moth, the kaiju destruction really looks like nothing more than a hurricane documentary.
However, if you are a kaiju enthusiast like me, you'll love the movie for what it is and not so much what it has to offer in monster destruction. But, if your looking for a cheep monster flick, you may enjoy this, but you may not. This movie is really based on personal preference.
0CommentWas this review helpful to you?YesNoSending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
on May 27, 2002
it for your kids.
Fantastic. You haven't lived until...
I loved this movie when a kid, just like I loved Terrytoons, Disney, "March of the Wooden Soldiers," Hayley Mills, and Christmas specials with Natalie Wood dressed up in snowy white furry winter hoods.
You haven't seen it? No wonder you're in pain. There would be less need for Twelve Step Programs if stuff like this was required viewing for MD's and therapist's patients. Charm has taken a back seat to shaved heads, tattoos, black t-shirts, road rage, and Jerry Springer. And how have we fared?
This flick is so cheap here. Buy two. Don't cheat your kids. They need this as much as they need the Spice Girls, Metallica, Max Headroom or Spiderman or whoever...
0CommentWas this review helpful to you?YesNoSending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
on May 3, 2002
Mothra has always represented the divine side of monsters. Worshipped as a deity, it acts only from self-preservation and to protect its worshippers.
A giant egg is discovered on a little Japanese coastal town. The inhabitants build a sideshow around it, trying to capitalize on its oddity. Unknown to anyone, the egg belongs to Mothra. When its servants tries to recover the egg, they are imprisoned. THey summon Mothra who arrives at the same time at Godzilla. During the battle Mothra dies only to be replaced by its offspring, 2 caterpillars who spins a silken web to capture Godzilla.
Mothra represents the Japanese's love and fear of nature. The 90s remake is more technical but not better.
0CommentWas this review helpful to you?YesNoSending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
on August 3, 2015
H-Man looks striking resemble of The Blob. Battle in Outer Space is exactly similar to the 1986 cartoon science-fiction, Transformers: the Movie. Mothra is part of a fictional fantasy legend.

Mothra declear war on human race since the Carl Nelson and his gangsters kidnapped the twin small fairies and brought them to Japan. Mothra may seen bad at first, but she actually come to save the fairies. Somehow, the police and their allies shot and killed Nelson and rescue the fairies. they painted the symbols onto the runway of airport. With church bells and a symbol manages to attract Mothra. People released the fairies to be reunites Mothra, restoring peace and happiness on the island
0CommentWas this review helpful to you?YesNoSending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
on July 15, 2001
Mothra is perhaps one of the best movies Toho co has ever made. I admit, the specail effects aren't all that great, however I gave Mothra a five because of its epic story. This movie will be enjoyed by people of all ages but to young children it teaches a lesson to not get greedy or be punished ( like how Nelson was by causing the twin girls to call Mothra ). I really think Godzilla fans will enjoy this a lot because Mothra appears in G-Films such as Godzilla vs. Mothra, Ghidra the Three- Headed Monster, Destroy All Monsters, and Godzilla and Mothra: The Battle for Earth. No matter how films progress, Mothra will always be one of the greatest Toho films ever made.
0CommentWas this review helpful to you?YesNoSending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
     
 
Customers who viewed this item also viewed
The Godzilla Collection
The Godzilla Collection by Ishirô Honda (DVD - 2014)
CDN$ 27.97

Rodan and the War of the Gargantuas
Rodan and the War of the Gargantuas by Russ Tamblyn (DVD - 2010)
CDN$ 14.92