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Ignorance: How It Drives Science Hardcover – Mar 27 2012


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Amazon.com: 50 reviews
36 of 39 people found the following review helpful
Fascinating and not at all "ignorant" May 23 2012
By Wulfstan - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Hardcover
Stuart Firestein is chair of the biological sciences department at Columbia University- where one of the classes he teaches is indeed "Ignorance".

"In fact more often than not, science is like looking for a black cat in a dark room, and there may not be a cat in the room." says Firestein. Then you need to understand what a scientist does next is to run into another dark room to do it all over again!

And sometimes (like with the experiments on luminiferous aether) , failure can prove as interesting and move science forward as much as a successful experiment.

It's important to understand what by "ignorance" here the author is not talking about willful ignorance, but more about a what has yet to be found out and tested.

The book has several interesting case studies and anecdotes, such as one scientist using a talking parrot to find out what they didn't know about the human brain. Also, the author points out that when a scientist gets a chance to predict the future- he is very often wrong. The author also goes into his rather unorthodox and interesting professional history.

Science is a matter of taking a `educated guess'= (a hypothesis) , which is then tested repeatedly until it becomes a "theory". Many people don't understand that a `scientific theory" isn't a guess, but something that has been proven to be right after repeated rigorous testing. The hypothesis is the guess, not a theory.

I agree with the author in that what's truly exciting is all that's still left to explore and find, things that we may have no idea even exist.

Easy to read, even for the layman.
21 of 22 people found the following review helpful
A Little Gem of a Book June 6 2012
By Book Fanatic - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Hardcover
This is a small book in size and length and therefore it doesn't take long to read it. It's a refreshing change to have an author make his point without beating it to death by droning on and on.

It's important to note that the title is a little misleading. Maybe it should have been called "Questions and How They Drive Science". The author is not suggesting we be intentionally uninformed, but that we look to the areas where we don't have explanations and answers for future discoveries.

This is a thinking person's book and the point is that the more we discover the more we find we don't know the answers. Each question answered by science raises more areas of "ignorance"; more unknowns. This is a good book and worth reading. Please take advantage of the "Search Inside" feature of this book on Amazon. Read the available text in chapter one to get an idea about what the book is all about.

Recommended.
12 of 12 people found the following review helpful
Explains how science really works and is a joyful read July 9 2012
By J. Schimel - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
For years, I've said in my own classes that "knowledge is a 'waste product' of science"--once the paper is written it goes on the shelf and becomes part of the past. We're on to the next question. This book captures that idea eloquently and engagingly to explain what moves science and motivates scientists. It is beautifully written and develops the points to highlight their implications for society at large.

I loved that the book was short and pithy--Dr. Firestein took the time to write the short letter, and to collapse the arguments and stories down to their essence. He illustrates the fascination of science, its challenge, its compulsion, and its joy in a way no other book I have ever seen comes close.

I've been a scientist for 30 years, and this book says things I've known and understood for most of that career, but says it in a way that is fresh and novel. Even for me, its a rejuvenating reminder of why I went into science. A useful reminder when most of the day can get caught up in meetings and business instead of 'real' science.
11 of 12 people found the following review helpful
Approachable, with implications beyond scientific inquiry June 4 2012
By Faisal Nsour - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
I appreciate this little book because Stuart Firestein does exactly what he sets out to do. He conveys the experience of dealing with ignorance while working at the edge of what is known. He does so with simple language and with warmth. And he follows his own advice about humility with regard to what one knows by bringing in perspectives from scientists outside his field.

The book is light reading, although thinking about what you aren't thinking about can be slippery at times. Maybe that's why it's so fruitful to spend time on it. The ideas here are useful for anyone living in the modern world. Give more attention to questions than answers.
28 of 36 people found the following review helpful
Ignorance is Bliss July 22 2012
By MoseyOn - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Hardcover
I saw this short book on a display table at a bookstore and it looked like it would be a nice examination of scientific work for a non-scientist who is nevertheless very interested in science both as a way of organizing and discovering knowledge, and as a core part of a college or university education. And the book is that, in a way, though it is not entirely satisfying. The book stems from a course that Firestein, a neurobiologist, teaches at Columbia University. The idea is appealing and important: The scientist is driven not by what we know, but by what we don't know. It is the gaps in our knowledge, the questions, the unknown beyond the edge of knowledge, that provide the juice for the scientist. If you want to get scientists talking, ask what they don't know, what they're working on, not about the latest data they have produced. And while this is not a great book, and not as deep as I hoped it might be, Firestein's central point is well worth remembering. The book is short, but the truth is that Firestein could have made the point in even fewer words before getting to his case studies. And he could have dropped the little comments out of the side of his mouth that I guess were intended to bring a bit of levity to a serious topic, but which were mostly off topic, sometimes annoying, and easily expendable. But that's a quibble. I was hoping for a careful, nuanced, and probing examination of ignorance and its importance in the quest for knowledge. Perhaps I was looking for something with a bit more epistemological depth. But it's not for me to decide what kind of book Firestein or anyone else should write. I certainly don't regret reading this book. It is worth spending a few hours with as a reminder that there is a lot we don't know--and that the world would be far less interesting if that were not the case.


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