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In the Skin of a Lion Paperback – 1997

4 out of 5 stars 55 customer reviews

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Product Details

  • Paperback
  • Publisher: Vintage (1997)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0679772669
  • ISBN-13: 978-0679772668
  • Product Dimensions: 13 x 1.2 x 20.3 cm
  • Shipping Weight: 181 g
  • Average Customer Review: 4.0 out of 5 stars 55 customer reviews
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: #222,212 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)
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Customer Reviews

Top Customer Reviews

Format: Paperback
In 1987, Ondaatje wrote his chef d'ouevre, In the Skin of a Lion, which combines the best of his previous prose, poetry, and recent autobiography. Here one will see fictional characters come to believable life, prose more sonorous than most poetry of the day, and learn more about the history and politics of Canada than one does at school (unless, of course, one is lucky enough to be Canadian.) Many feel (and I believe rightly so) that this is the book that should have won the prestigious Booker Prize--an honor later given to 1992's The English Patient. Certainly, this is the book that helped give birth to the latter. It is here that we meet Patrick Lewis, Caravaggio, and a much younger Hana. Lewis is the anti-hero of the story, so deftly written that we grow with him, we love with him, and we grieve with him. I somehow feel that Patrick is closer to Ondaatje's heart more so than any other character that he's written until the advent of Kip in The English Patient. The tale of Patrick's life in "Upper America" made me weep at each reading, as did the sheer beauty of Ondaatje's prose. In my humble opinion, it is his finest prose to date.
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Format: Paperback
I will begin with the problem of the book. It reads initially slowly. This is, for many, a problem. It's dense prose, in fractured time. It's also a traditional story, with a plot that moves in a direct line up to the pointed climax, and then a resolution down from that high point.
Basically, the beginning is slow, yet dense, and becomes more intense as time passes. If you have not the patience to push through the first thirty pages, you should stop reading books. The plot thickens, and intensifies until the moment of pointed climax. And I cannot say 'Shh' without a shiver.
The prose: gorgeous without being over-the-top. The characters: firmly and clearly human, while each is a little super-human in their own quiet ways, as many of us are.
In other words, one of the greatest novels in the world to emerge from the late twentieth century. The techniques are firmly rooted in time and place, and the words shed light on a world that is, for us, indescribable. A heart, and a mind, so rare to find together, lies before you. Be prepared for a life-changing journey.
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Format: Paperback
I am trapped by these words, I slow down on each one almost notwanting to know what comes next because I know it'll most certainly besomething that puts me in awe and leaves me hungry for more.
I thought The English Patient was a wonderful book, I walked in Libyan desert looking for Zerzura for weeks after reading that book. But In The Skin Of A Lion is something so much more. This book moves me so I'm left speechless. The continuance, the surprises, the beauty, the characters. If it was possible to choose to write like someone I would absolutely pick Michael Ondaatje. His work is simply beautiful.
I am amazed. Read this book, read all of them. Find the fine red line that ties all the stories together. END
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Format: Paperback
I preface this by saying I'm one of the few who did not enjoy the English Patient. I did enjoy this.
The dreamlike, almost random quality of the narrative is amazing and it's filled with wonderdully imagined details and scenes that really put me in awe of this writer. I laughed out loud when Carvaggio escapes prison by painting himself blue, and found myself really touched by the imprints of his lost love that the main character finds continually.
Also, it is obvious the writer did an intense ammount of research into the lives of the people of the 1930's in canada. The workmen, the political statements, the actions all seem so real and work as a good balance to the dreamlike details.
His two weaknesses seem to be his dialogue and the ending. The dialogue constantly pulled me out of the dreamstate I was so happy to be in; I could never hear people talking like they do in this work, but maybe the people I know are vastly different than Ondaatje. The ending was also dissatisfying; it wrapped up almost like a political thriller instead of adhering to the poetic quality that really drives the work.
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Format: Paperback
I thought this was a mystical enchanting book. The descriptions of work were strong and powerful. Who can forget the images of dangeling from the bridge, dynamiting the log jams, digging the waterworks tunnel. Partrick is a "Billy Budd" character committed to ideals and responsibilities. A question. On page 224 it says "He [Harris] stood over Patrick." 'He lay down to sleep, until he was woken from out of a dream. He saw the lions around him glorying in life; then he took his axe in his hand, he drew his sword from his belt, and he fell upon them like an arrow from the string." Brackets are mine. I feel sure this a Biblical reference. Do you know where it is from? I am very interested to know the answer. Please reply to nhalff@aol.com
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Format: Paperback
This one is basically the straw that broke the camel's back when it comes to my experience of modern literature. A bizarre, meandering tale of post-Sartrean emptiness full of cold, indifferent nymphomaniacs whose idea of a good time is brushing semen through their lovers' hair. The book verges from beautiful descriptive passages into pointless and awkward sex scenes between characters who seem to care about each other as much as one would care about some rotting leftovers on the kitchen counter from two days ago. If that isn't enough, descriptions of workers building and mining for pages on end are peppered throughout the meaningless, cold-as-dead-fish conversations between the hollowed-out shadows that are supposed to pass for characters in the novel. Frankly, I have zero idea why this is viewed as some kind of classic. "In the Skin of a Lion" is little more than an irritating mess of unlikeable characters that tries so hard to be artsy and avant-garde that it ventures far beyond the pale into the realm of the ridiculous. Avoid.
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