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India Paperback – Aug 1 2003


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Product Details

  • Paperback: 1088 pages
  • Publisher: Lonely Planet Publications; 10th Revised edition edition (Aug. 1 2003)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1740594215
  • ISBN-13: 978-1740594219
  • Product Dimensions: 3.8 x 12.7 x 19.7 cm
  • Shipping Weight: 907 g
  • Average Customer Review: 4.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (1 customer review)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: #1,742,099 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

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First Sentence
For many thousands of years, India's social and religious structures have withstood in, famines, religious persecutions, political upheavals and many other cata. Read the first page
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Front Cover | Table of Contents | Excerpt | Index | Back Cover
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5 of 5 people found the following review helpful By J. Marren on Sept. 20 2003
Format: Paperback
One should never rely on just one source for a major adventure, as any trip to India is, and this very complete guide is no exception. This guide has excellent information on the history, culture and people of India, and the color section on Sacred India is a nice touch. It has lots of very practical information on what to bring, what you can and can't photograph, what to read before you go, how to avoid "cultural misunderstandings." It's helpful for preparing people for the assault Westerners often experience--ask for directions and you have a friend/guide for life, often accompanied by a very aggressive demand for money. The health and safety information is also pretty good--except that they say that tap water in cities is OK to drink--ignore this advice! I find this guide limited in its retaurant and hotel selections, especially if you're not a low-budget or student traveller. Also, information changes constantly--internet cafes spring up and close overnight, new restaurants and hotels open up every day, and the political situation bears watching up until the day you leave. And of course no guide book has really good maps. But why limit yourself--the internet is chock full of information on this wonderful, confusing, fascinating country!
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Most Helpful Customer Reviews on Amazon.com (beta)

Amazon.com: 3 reviews
17 of 17 people found the following review helpful
Good basic introduction to India March 17 2005
By "KB" Kamla Srinivasan - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Paperback
Having grown up in India I thought I could wing it when we went for an extended stay in India. We were going to be living in Bombay, now called Mumbai...a city that I had never lived in, but had visited briefly 15 years ago. But, once we landed in India and started exploring Bombay, we got suggestions and opinions from various people. Some of these suggestions were good, and some not so good. It was then that I decided to reach out and buy a copy of Lonely Planet India. (I believe India was the first country Lonely Planet people wrote about.)

I had previously used Lonely Guide editions to different countries, and found their guide books very useful. I thought their book on India might help me in discovering Bombay and other parts of India.

After having used the book for a while, I have mixed opinions about the book. I think the mixed opinion stems from two reasons: one India is too vast a country for one book to capture everything, and two having grown up in India my expectations maybe a little bit more demanding of the book.

The strength of the book is that it provides a good basic introduction to the country, and a broad overview of the history and culture along with a laundry lists of do and don'ts that are very useful things to remember. For instance, they do an excellent job of providing information on various modes of transportation and how to reach your destination.

With referfence to Bombay the book provides a good thumbnail sketch of the city and some good basic information on what to do, where to eat etc etc. However, the information provided on the city is confined mostly to the southern tip (referred to as "town" by the local denizens) of this vast sprawling city. They miss out on some interesting things about other parts of Bombay, and the new eating joints etc etc. What they have failed to capture is the changing and dynamic nature to Bombay.

I would recommend this book to those who are visiting India for the first time. If you need more information you might want to buy a couple of travel magazines that are available in news stands or pick up any one of those handy travel brochures. And if you have any friends who have travelled to India do ask them for suggestions.
8 of 8 people found the following review helpful
No one guide has it all.... Sept. 20 2003
By J. Marren - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Paperback
One should never rely on just one source for a major adventure, as any trip to India is, and this very complete guide is no exception. This guide has excellent information on the history, culture and people of India, and the color section on Sacred India is a nice touch. It has lots of very practical information on what to bring, what you can and can't photograph, what to read before you go, how to avoid "cultural misunderstandings." It's helpful for preparing people for the assault Westerners often experience--ask for directions and you have a friend/guide for life, often accompanied by a very aggressive demand for money. The health and safety information is also pretty good--except that they say that tap water in cities is OK to drink--ignore this advice! I find this guide limited in its retaurant and hotel selections, especially if you're not a low-budget or student traveller. Also, information changes constantly--internet cafes spring up and close overnight, new restaurants and hotels open up every day, and the political situation bears watching up until the day you leave. And of course no guide book has really good maps. But why limit yourself--the internet is chock full of information on this wonderful, confusing, fascinating country!
4 of 4 people found the following review helpful
Simply the best... Sept. 19 2005
By Robert R. Lane - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Paperback
I traveled through northern India relying solely on Lonely Planet's advise on hotels and places to see - it never let me down. It gave great advise that saved much time and expense regarding the unreliability of airlines running to and from Leh, in Kashmir. If you're going outside of a structured tour package, this book is a necessity - no other guide compares.

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