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Inside Man [Soundtrack]

Terence Blanchard Audio CD

Price: CDN$ 21.98 & FREE Shipping on orders over CDN$ 25. Details
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Product Details


1. Ten Thirty
2. Thrown a Bone
3. Stevie Switcharoo
4. Dalton’s World
5. 357
6. 392
7. 2nd Floor Window
8. Defend Brooklyn
9. Food Chain
10. Above Your Pay Grade
11. Everything Hunky Dory
12. Frazier’s Tour
13. Press Here To Play
14. Nothing Yet
15. Demands in Place
16. Here Lies Peter Hammond
17. Nazis Pay Too Well
18. Nice Talking to You
19. They Bugged Us
20. Hostage Takedown
See all 27 tracks on this disc

Product Description

Amazon.ca

From the first seconds of the film Inside Man, a compelling mood is set via the powerful music that accompanies the opening scene. The song, "Chaiyya Chaiyya Bollywood Joint" is an adapted, hip-hop-inflected tune (featuring Punjabi MC) from India's most famous soundtrack creator, A.R. Rahman. Those hoping for a full-on South Asian exploration should note that this is the only Bollywood number on the disc; the rest of the film is scored by Spike Lee regular Terence Blanchard (Malcolm X, 25th Hour, Bamboozled.) Blanchard--a former member of both Lionel Hampton's band and Art Blakey's Jazz Messengers--has created moments of quiet beauty in the soundtrack; "Press Here To Play" is a pensive piano and trumpet journey that ends (too soon) at 90 seconds, while "Nazis Pay Too Well" is another highlight, a masterfully-mournful orchestral piece well worth further expansion. Those pieces aside, the lion's share of the soundtrack is a variation on one of two separate musical themes, both of which set an appropriate tone throughout the film. On their own, however, they are almost too soundtrack-y to play even as background music over dinner. For personal use, Blanchard's non-film, jazz recordings may be the way to go. --Denise Sheppard

Product Description


Customer Reviews

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Most Helpful Customer Reviews on Amazon.com (beta)
Amazon.com: 4.1 out of 5 stars  25 reviews
99 of 104 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Liked the movie but LOVE the soundtrack! March 26 2006
By Kelly - Published on Amazon.com
Format:Audio CD
I saw Spike Lee's "Inside Man" Friday night with a friend and we both enjoyed the movie a lot. The very unexpected payoff was that we enjoyed the song "Chaiyya Chaiyya" (enhanced with rap/hip-hop and even a tinge of Lord-of-the-Dance colors) so much that we were the last to leave the theater just so we could hear the very last note of that long remix. The song made me want to get up and bellydance even though I wouldn't know how. I told my friend he simply got to pick up that CD pronto--and he did first thing Saturday so that by the time he picked me up for our Saturday evening date we could listen to that CD in his car.

According to what I found online, "Chaiyya Chaiyya" is from the Bollywood movie "Dil Se," released in 1998. That particular song became a hit not only in India but also in England and elsewhere. The "Chaiyya Chaiyya" music video was also very popular because it featured people dancing on top of a moving train, including the director himself.

The other cuts on the soundtrack are also top quality and very enjoyable. I haven't wanted to purchase or listen to a movie soundtrack since Hannibal (2001) and so this Inside Man soundtrack really hit me as a very pleasant surprise. I highly recommend it to anyone who enjoys good music of any genre.
13 of 14 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Chaihya Chaiya- from A.R. Rahman March 27 2006
By K. Chowdhury - Published on Amazon.com
Format:Audio CD
Chaiya Chaiya is from the Bollywood Music Composer AR Rahman who has changed the style of bollywood music since early nineties. He is also the music composer of the grand $28 million opera LOTR opened in Toranto,Canada recently. Me and couple of my indian friends at the theater were taken aback when the title track "chaiya chaiya" started. We were definitely feeling proud of the that inclusion.

The original song was picturised on a small toy train over the green himalayas of North East India (in the state of Arunachal Pradesh) close to China Border. It featured Shahrukh Khan , a very popular hero in Bollywood with awesome choreography.
13 of 14 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Good Spike Lee movie March 27 2006
By Jack - Published on Amazon.com
Format:Audio CD
Enjoyed seeing 'Inside Man' by Spike. I was energized with the opening title soundtrack 'Chaiyya Chaiyya', so much so that I searched till I found a copy of it from the movie 'Dil Se'. The rhythm was excellent. Went looking for more music like this to no avail. Will keep searching... very enjoyable!
5 of 5 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Chaiyya Chaiyya July 11 2006
By Gottfried Leibniz - Published on Amazon.com
Format:Audio CD
The original bollywood version of this song was written by Gulzar in what appears to be urdu, it was composed by A.R. Rahman. I believe this song is adapted from a Pakistani sufi song called thayya thayya which was originally sung in Punjabi, you can definitely feel the sufi vibe on this track. I have heard this song before but i especially liked the way it was used in this movie, When i listened to the song i picked up many urdu/islamic words in the song. I would recommend this soundtrack based on this song.
5 of 5 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Chopped Inside Man Nov. 1 2009
By Wayne L. Hill - Published on Amazon.com
Format:Audio CD|Verified Purchase
Composer Terance Blanchard is a master composer - I'd rate him one of the finest presently working. But the problem is with the soundtrack.

One would assume Mr. Blanchard developed his themes in the standard, quasi-symphonic format when he composed the music for this film. The problem with the soundtrack is that the music has been "sliced and diced" into miniature little vignettes to match events in the film. While that technique may suit the visual medium, it is dreadful when one merely wants to enjoy the music.

Consequently, we're treated to, for example, the theme of the antagonist called "Dalton's World" presented, in all of its splendid orchestral magnificience, for a mere 46 seconds. This theme, which is a masterpiece, and which reappears throughout the soundtrack in the fasion of a Wagnerian "leitmotif"... has been uprooted from its assumed musical development (think symphony) and dropped as a tidbit, with no beginning or end. This is incredibly frustrating!

The entire soundtrack is presented this way - as if 7 or 8 short pieces of really good music were run through a film director's vegetable slicer and then scattered to the wind. There is no sence of relationship, development, synthesis or affinity. Because Mr. Blanchard displays in this soundtrack the gifts of a great composer, this is doubly irritating! Ah; what might have been!

I wish they'd figure out that people who buy soundtracks do so because they like the music - not because they want to "utilize the musical fragments to visualize the motion picture" - or whatever lead the producer of the soundtrack to present such a hatchet job! Ah; to get my hands on a copy of Mr. Blanchard's original music - before it was guillotined to fit the movie - that would be priceless indeed!

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