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The Interpretation of Financial Statements [Paperback]

Benjamin Graham , Chrales McGolrick
4.3 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (6 customer reviews)

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Book Description

June 3 1987
First published in 1937, The Interpretation of Financial Statements is renowned for its clear, precise language and common sense explanations of financial terms and practices. By learning how to decipher financial figures, business people, investors, and students will be able to understand corporate statements and have a sound basis for good business judgment.
--This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

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"Graham ranks as this century's (and perhaps history's) most important thinker on applied portfolio investment." -- John Train, author of The Money Masters

"[Graham]...formed the framework of thinking about the stock market that has inspired the investment community for nearly a century." -- Smart Money --This text refers to the Hardcover edition.

About the Author

Benjamin Graham (1894-1976), the father of value investing, has been an inspiration for many of today's most successful businesspeople. He is also the author of Securities Analysis and The Interpretation of Financial Statements. --This text refers to the Hardcover edition.

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14 of 14 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Why This Edition Instead of 3rd/4th Edition? June 19 2003
Format:Hardcover
Why they republished this edition when they might have republished the Second or Third Revised Edition (by Graham and Charles McGolrick, published in 1964 and 1975, respectively) beats me. The latter two editions are unquestionably better,as both are more current, and contain more useful tips regarding contextual interpretation.
It's true that the primary value of Graham's text is its framework, which provides concision in summarizing a potentially confusing topic. This framework persists through all four editions. Also, it's true that all four editions are pretty dated (there is no discussion of cash flow statement interpretation in any edition obviously, for example, although Graham alludes to the significance of cashflow interpretation somewhat disparagingly in the latter editions).
But all of Graham's guidelines for balance sheet analysis are still current in the latter two editions, as are his brief guidelines for bond analysis and earnings power. The first edition seems less useful in these respects.
One might assume that there is value in going back to the first edition of this small volume as one might go back to the first edition of Security Analysis. There are indeed nuggets in the first edition of Security Analysis which have been mysteriously removed from later editions. But that isn't true with The Interpretation of Financial Statements. If you can get your hands on a copy of the 1964 or 1975 edition of this book, you will likely find either more useful than this original edition.
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5 of 5 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars This is my investing bible March 4 2003
Format:Hardcover
Although corporate 10Q's have become more complex due to a lot of the offbalance sheet investments they do, e.g. Enron. If a company is honest and has value this book will help you find it. So the way I approach my investing I have to assume all companies are honest unless proven otherwise.
So much time is taken to explain diversification by many other books, but none gives you the practical expertise to make an informed decision. This book does. It is a handy reference that sits on my desk. I use it to review annual reports and to interpret online SEC filings just to make sure the companies I have invested in are actually healthy.
This book is small, but what I have found over the years is that smaller books are better. They leave out the fluff and all you get are the meat and potatoes of what you need to know.
If you take your time to understand the information presented and use it, you'll be teaching your broker a thing or two at the end of the day.
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Very Worthwhile Aug. 9 2001
Format:Hardcover
Like gold, this small book provides a very high value. With interest in Graham and value investing growing, this small book provides a compact reference to the various parts of a balance sheet and income statement you will become very familiar with as you read his other books.
Fantastic reference on its own. .
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