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Interview with the Vampire: Anniversary edition [Deckle Edge] [Hardcover]

Anne Rice
4.3 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (477 customer reviews)
List Price: CDN$ 41.00
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Kindle Edition --  
School & Library Binding CDN $16.25  
Hardcover, Deckle Edge, April 12 1976 CDN $25.71  
Paperback CDN $13.72  
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Audio, CD, Audiobook, Unabridged CDN $18.17  
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Book Description

April 12 1976 Vampire Chronicles
The time is now.

We are in a small room with the vampire, face to face, as he speaks--as he pours out the hypnotic, shocking, moving, and erotically charged confessions of his first two hundred years as one of the living dead. . .

He speaks quietly, plainly, even gently . . . carrying us back to the night when he departed human existence as heir--young, romantic, cultivated--to a great Louisiana plantation, and was inducted by the radiant and sinister Lestat into the other, the "endless," life . . . learning first to sustain himself on the blood of cocks and rats caught in the raffish streets of New Orleans, then on the blood of human beings . . . to the years when, moving away from his final human ties under the tutelage of the hated yet necessary Lestat, he gradually embraces the habits, hungers, feelings of vampirism: the detachment, the hardened will, the "superior" sensual pleasures.

He carries us back to the crucial moment in a dark New Orleans street when he finds the exquisite lost young child Claudia, wanting not to hurt but to comfort her, struggling against the last residue of human feeling within him . . .

We see how Claudia in turn is made a vampire--all her passion and intelligence trapped forever in the body of a small child--and how they arrive at their passionate and dangerous alliance, their French Quarter life of opulence: delicate Grecian statues, Chinese vases, crystal chandeliers, a butler, a maid, a stone nymph in the hidden garden court . . . night curving into night with their vampire senses heightened to the beauty of the world, thirsting for the beauty of death--a constant stream of vulnerable strangers awaiting them below . . .

We see them joined against the envious, dangerous Lestat, embarking on a perilous search across Europe for others like themselves, desperate to discover the world they belong to, the ways of survival, to know what they are and why, where they came from, what their future can be . . .

We follow them across Austria and Transylvania, encountering their kind in forms beyond their wildest imagining . . . to Paris, where footsteps behind them, in exact rhythm with their own, steer them to the doors of the Théâtre des Vampires--the beautiful, lewd, and febrile mime theatre whose posters of penny-dreadful vampires at once mask and reveal the horror within . . . to their meeting with the eerily magnetic Armand, who brings them, at last, into intimacy with a whole brilliant and decadent society of vampires, an intimacy that becomes sudden terror when they are compelled to confront what they have feared and fled . . .

In its unceasing flow of spellbinding storytelling, of danger and flight, of loyalty and treachery, Interview with the Vampire bears witness of a literary imagination of the first order.

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From Amazon

In the now-classic novel Interview with the Vampire, Anne Rice refreshed the archetypal vampire myth for a late-20th-century audience. The story is ostensibly a simple one: having suffered a tremendous personal loss, an 18th-century Louisiana plantation owner named Louis Pointe du Lac descends into an alcoholic stupor. At his emotional nadir, he is confronted by Lestat, a charismatic and powerful vampire who chooses Louis to be his fledgling. The two prey on innocents, give their "dark gift" to a young girl, and seek out others of their kind (notably the ancient vampire Armand) in Paris. But a summary of this story bypasses the central attractions of the novel. First and foremost, the method Rice chose to tell her tale--with Louis' first-person confession to a skeptical boy--transformed the vampire from a hideous predator into a highly sympathetic, seductive, and all-too-human figure. Second, by entering the experience of an immortal character, one raised with a deep Catholic faith, Rice was able to explore profound philosophical concerns--the nature of evil, the reality of death, and the limits of human perception--in ways not possible from the perspective of a more finite narrator.

While Rice has continued to investigate history, faith, and philosophy in subsequent Vampire novels (including The Vampire Lestat, The Queen of the Damned, The Tale of the Body Thief, Memnoch the Devil, and The Vampire Armand), Interview remains a treasured masterpiece. It is that rare work that blends a childlike fascination for the supernatural with a profound vision of the human condition. --Patrick O'Kelley

From Library Journal

Rice turned the vampire genre on its ear with this first novel (LJ 5/1/76), which evolved into one of the most popular series in recent history. Though the quality of the books has declined, this nonetheless is a marvelous, innovative, and literate tale of the longing for love and the search for redemption. This 20th-anniversary edition offers a trade-size paperback for a good price.
Copyright 1997 Reed Business Information, Inc. --This text refers to the Paperback edition.

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Customer Reviews

Most helpful customer reviews
5.0 out of 5 stars Interviewing the vampire March 4 2007
By E. A Solinas HALL OF FAME TOP 10 REVIEWER
Format:Hardcover
Anne Rice took the publishing world by storm in "Interview With the Vampire," a haunting book that turned the evil-bloodsucker cliche on its ear. Her lush prose and vivid characters turn the dramatic plot and strange scenarios into a chilling look at good and evil, thankfully without melodrama.

In modern times, a young man is interviewing a vampire on tape recorder. The vampire is Louis Pointe du Lac. In 1791, his ultra-religious brother died tragically after an argument, and Louis sank into remorse and despair. Enter Lestat de Lioncourt, a charming vampire who offers Louis a way out of his grief.

The two vampires wander the cities of the world, with Lestat teaching his reluctant pupil the ways of vampirism. In time Louis makes a "daughter": Claudia, a vampire child with the mind of a woman. Now, depressed and unhappy, Louis explains how he and Claudia fled Lestat, only to encounter new tragedies that still haunt him to this day...

Moral struggles are rarely present in vampire novels. Certainly not from the vampire's point of view. But that is exactly what Anne Rice attempts in this book. She wraps her dark story in lush prose and beautiful descriptions of Paris and her hometown of New Orleans, making this one of the best-written vampire stories since "Dracula."

No gore and grit here. Rice's writing is exceptionally beautiful, full of lush descriptions and intricate detail. Best of all, it has that rare quality of atmosphere -- no matter how enchanting the vampire, or beautiful the setting, a feeling of darkness and sorrow runs through it.
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4.0 out of 5 stars Great work! June 10 2004
Format:Mass Market Paperback
This was a great novel. I wish I would have read this first, before I saw the film, that didn't even come close to doing the novel justice. Although I think Brad Pitt does make a great Louis. Interview is told from the perspective of Louis, a lone vampire who tells the story of his life to Daniel, a reporter (though you don't know the name of the 'boy' until the next book). He speaks of his relationship with Lestat, his maker, and Claudia, their 'daughter.' The tale is a great one, and much more complicated than shown in the film. Also, the ending of this book is very good, again, different from the film. The book held my interest from start to finish, which I hoped it would. I'm not a fast reader and I finished the first three Vampire Chronicles novels in 4 months. They're that good. This one is an excellent start. The only bad thing about this book is that sometimes it can get confusing because it's told in third person, but Louis is telling the story to someone else in first person. Other than that it is wonderful!
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5.0 out of 5 stars vampires: reflecting human nature May 27 2004
Format:Mass Market Paperback
This was the first vampire book I've ever read, and it wasn't really what I expected at all. It was better. The story, presented as an interview (naturally) traces the life and after-life of the vampire Louis from suicidal young man to cold, calm, veteran killer. Rice dispels many cliches with the *shocking* revelation that vampires are not repeled by crucifixes or garlic, and can see their reflections in mirrors. Louis himself is a most sensitive vampire who learns to both appreciate and fear the heightened senses of his kind. He also has a difficult time adjusting to killing, and hates his own innate cruelty as much as he craves blood. Louis has many thoughtful reflections on the concepts of death and evil that even mortals may find revealing (and which never sacrifice the pace of the unraveling drama). His introspective personality clashes with his irrepressible and often reckless master/creator, the vampire Lestat. Lestat uses the addition of the child vampire Claudia to their "family" as a means of keeping Louis subordinate. Through her immortal vampires, Rice actually addresses the theme of human nature: sensual, paradoxical, and often cruel.
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3.0 out of 5 stars Curse of the Vampires May 26 2004
Format:Mass Market Paperback
I love vampires. Always have, onscreen and on the published page - from Bela Lugosi's Dracula (seen countless times on the old Saturday afternoon Shock Theater) to Stephanie Rothman's hip 1970 VELVET VAMPIRE.
So it was with great enthusiasm that I approached Anne Rice's work several years ago, and it was with slight disappointment that I exited it each time. I don't know why she doesn't appeal to me the way she does to so many others. "Read the first one, read the first one!" my friends all admonished. "It's the best." So I did. I have just finished INTERVIEW WITH THE VAMPIRE, and I'm no more an Anne Rice enthusiast than when I started. Maybe it's the book's lush overwriting, its constant purple prose, its almost endless striving to be elegant. Maybe it's the violence. Some of it does go "over the top", and I am usually not a prude about such things. I don't know. I'm just left as cold as one of the blood hunters Rice depicts.
Oh Rice has "skills", to coin a popular teenage phrase. She can create a memorable set piece that has the reader turning pages. And there are a number of memorable moments in this book. The initiation of Claudia. The "death" of Lestat. The fabulous Parisian Theater of Vampires. The concluding scene with the young reporter. Each is riveting, even enthralling. But in-between those scenes there is too much chatter, too much introspection, too much - huff and gruff.
I appreciate the book's classic status. And I'm going to continue reading Anne Rice, hoping the magic spell she has cast on millions of readers will soon ensare me.
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Most recent customer reviews
5.0 out of 5 stars Five Stars
Very very brilliant writing so loved it and the movie was a hit...
Published 1 month ago by Willow Wind Book Reviews
5.0 out of 5 stars Great gift for my 13 year old son
I thought my 13 year old son would like this book (and evetually more in the series) since he was complaining about the "sissy" vampire stuff out these days. Read more
Published on Oct. 6 2010 by Dennis Mccolm
5.0 out of 5 stars What a Ride!!
Anne Rice is such an amazing writer!!! This book will take you into this wonderful world she has created and make you feel like it was created JUST for you.... Read more
Published on July 24 2010 by Stephanie Johnson
5.0 out of 5 stars Interview with the Vampire
Interview with the vampire by Anne Rice tells the story of the life of a vampire from the point of him becoming a vampire until the present time of the telling of the story itself. Read more
Published on July 19 2004 by Jacob Gest
5.0 out of 5 stars It Rocks
I think this book is amazing.
While vampires have been written about before, I don't think anyone ever did it quite as well as Anne rice did in her very first novel... Read more
Published on July 10 2004 by Angel Stormdancer
5.0 out of 5 stars Enthralling
This is the best vampire story of our time. Rice has an amazing gift for conveying emotion and writing dialogue. Read more
Published on June 28 2004 by Caradae Linore
5.0 out of 5 stars I LOVED IT!!!! But...
I found the book to be a great piece of work, almost poetic writing and pilosophy/psychology inlaid within the pages. Read more
Published on June 25 2004 by Montine
5.0 out of 5 stars ~Marvelous~
This has been a truly MARVELOUS book to read. I just finished it yesterday and was engrossed with it. Spellbound. Read more
Published on June 7 2004 by Shannon
5.0 out of 5 stars modern-day vampire classic
This of course is the first book in Anne Rice's Vampire Chronicles. In this dark tale of treachery, Lestat makes immortal vampires of Louis and a little girl who will never grow... Read more
Published on June 5 2004 by I ain't no porn writer
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