Start reading Intimate Partner Sexual Violence on your Kindle in under a minute. Don't have a Kindle? Get your Kindle here.

Deliver to your Kindle or other device

 
 
 

Try it free

Sample the beginning of this book for free

Deliver to your Kindle or other device

Anybody can read Kindle bookseven without a Kindle devicewith the FREE Kindle app for smartphones, tablets, and computers.
Intimate Partner Sexual Violence: A Multidisciplinary Guide to Improving Services and Support for Survivors of Rape and Abuse
 
See larger image
 

Intimate Partner Sexual Violence: A Multidisciplinary Guide to Improving Services and Support for Survivors of Rape and Abuse [Kindle Edition]

Patricia Easteal , Jennifer Y. Levy-Peck , Barbara Roberts

Digital List Price: CDN$ 50.40 What's this?
Print List Price: CDN$ 52.95
Kindle Price: CDN$ 40.32 includes free international wireless delivery via Amazon Whispernet
You Save: CDN$ 12.63 (24%)

Formats

Amazon Price New from Used from
Kindle Edition CDN $40.32  
Paperback CDN $50.30  

Customers Who Bought This Item Also Bought


Product Description

Product Description

Intimate Partner Sexual Violence (IPSV) is the most common type of sexual violence and a common component of domestic violence, yet most cases go unreported and service responses are often inadequate. This book brings together advice for all those professionals working with individuals who have experienced IPSV and puts forward recommendations to tackle this prevalent form of sexual violence.

With contributions from leading experts on IPSV, Intimate Partner Sexual Violence is a comprehensive guide to the subject which bridges the gap between research and practice. Multidisciplinary and international in approach, the book covers key issues salient to all professionals - the impact of IPSV, reproductive coercion, the physical and psychological indicators, possible consequences of taking a case to court, and best practice service responses. One section also addresses the risks and needs of IPSV victims in different contexts, such as those in same-sex or teenage relationships, immigrant victims, and those living in rural areas or in prison.

This is an authoritative resource for all professionals who work with IPSV victims including counselors, social workers, refuge workers, victim advocates, mental health professionals, pastoral workers, lawyers, police, and health practitioners.

About the Author

Louise McOrmond-Plummer survived domestic violence which included repeated rape by a man who went on to commit murder. After gaining her freedom, she studied for an Associate Diploma in Welfare Studies (La Trobe University, Victoria) and has devoted 20 years to the study of intimate partner sexual violence, supporting survivors and making resources available for both survivors and professionals. She is co-author with Dr. Patricia Easteal of the book Real Rape, Real Pain: Help for women sexually assaulted by male partners, and runs the IPSV support and educational website Aphrodite Wounded (www.aphroditewounded.org). Patricia Easteal, AM, PhD is a Law Professor at the University of Canberra, Australia. She is an academic, author and advocate who was named the Australian Capital Territory Australian of the Year in 2010. She has published 14 books and well over 130 academic journal articles with a primary focus on access to justice for women. She is currently completing a book with a colleague in the UK looking at violence against women, society and the law. Jennifer Y. Levy-Peck, PhD, is a Clinical Psychologist working for a statewide sexual assault coalition in Washington, USA, providing training and developing resources on Intimate Partner Sexual Violence (IPSV). She has worked with trauma survivors and in program development for the past 30 years, including co-founding a domestic violence program. She is the author of an IPSV support group manual and a book, Healing The Harm Done: A Parent's Guide to Helping Your Child Overcome the Effects of Sexual Abuse. She provides training for national audiences on IPSV and related topics.

Product Details

  • Format: Kindle Edition
  • File Size: 1045 KB
  • Print Length: 338 pages
  • Page Numbers Source ISBN: 1849059128
  • Publisher: Jessica Kingsley Publishers (Oct. 21 2013)
  • Sold by: Amazon Digital Services, Inc.
  • Language: English
  • ASIN: B00G9DLEHK
  • Text-to-Speech: Enabled
  • X-Ray:
  •  Would you like to give feedback on images?


Customer Reviews

There are no customer reviews yet on Amazon.ca
5 star
4 star
3 star
2 star
1 star
Most Helpful Customer Reviews on Amazon.com (beta)
Amazon.com: 5.0 out of 5 stars  2 reviews
6 of 6 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Comprehensive, compassionate and compelling evidence about IPSV April 25 2014
By Sue L - Published on Amazon.com
Format:Kindle Edition
This book, written and edited by a collection of some of the most knowledgeable, experienced and active advocates in the field, is an invaluable resource on an issue that is astonishingly avoided and rarely acknowledged, even though it is pervasive and highly damaging. How pervasive and how damaging, you ask? The book has all the information and statistics anyone will need to be convinced of the state of play, globally and among different populations as well. The book is well structured, addressing overarching topics such as How Serious Is Intimate Partner Violence? (Part 2) and Intimate Partner Sexual Violence And Best Practice Service Response (Part 3) with several chapters in each part. Written in a scholarly yet compassionate style and very well referenced, it is certainly a comprehensive book on the topic of intimate partner sexual violence.

Two chapters stood out for me, chapter 14, Responding to Christian Survivors of Intimate Partner Sexual Violence, by Barbara Roberts, and chapter 15, Law Enforcement Response to Intimate Partner Violence by Mike Davis. Barbara Roberts, a survivor of domestic abuse and author of Not Under Bondage: Biblical Divorce for Abuse, Adultery and Desertion (2008), makes an excellent contribution. She advocates passionately as a Christian who understands the complexities facing Christian victims. In particular, she addresses the mandates from Scriptures that cause the most difficulties to Christian victims, showing quite comprehensively how they have been misunderstood and misapplied. As a voice for victims, she does not mince words - "Anger at the woeful responses of the church is not ungodly bitterness that a victim needs to repent of; it is justified and righteous anger, the same kind of anger that God has for those who ignore the cries of the oppressed..." (p.177), and "Apathy towards the needy is a serious sin (Ezekiel 16:49). Counselors must see abuse as a moral issue where the blame lies with the perpetrator, or they will not be able to convey 'you are not to blame' to the victim. And when victims suspect they are being judged as partly or wholly to blame, it is like having caustic soda poured in their wounds" (p.178). But apart from arguing from her experience, from logic and from sound exegesis, she also gives practical suggestions for helpful responses, for example, what to say to the victim and how to use the right words if a woman discloses sexual mistreatment.

I found Mike Davis' contribution enlightening and in some ways refreshing. In the list of contributors, Mike Davis is described as "a police sergeant for the Vancouver, Washington Police Dept, where he helped establish the City of Vancouver's first Domestic Violence Unit and served as the first Domestic Violence Sergeant." The reason I found his chapter refreshing - take a look at his opening statements, "As law enforcement we can and do have tremendous impact on people's lives. Often, police are a victim's first contact with someone who has the power and authority to deliver help and justice. Therefore, law enforcement must have a trained response to domestic violence (DV) and its related crimes, just as we do to a bank robbery in progress, a school shooter, or a bomb threat...police officers must take any form of IPV very seriously" (p. 186). Wow! The first thought to come into my head was, "Does a police officer like this really exist?!" I found his writing immensely readable, highly practical and sufficiently detailed. His experience as an officer dealing with DV offences is obvious, and his passion and commitment should be something every police officer in every police department everywhere (especially in Western countries that purport to fight violence against women and hold perpetrators to account) should emulate. The anecdotal evidence regarding the responses of law enforcement agencies is that they are not helpful to victims of intimate partner sexual assaults, often adding to their trauma. It is encouraging that there are Mike Davis' in the world who are prepared to take IPV seriously and have the know-how to investigate, lay charges and deal effectively with the offender. He obviously also understands the characteristics of IPSV offenders and suggests ways to interview suspects that work best.

I applaud the editors for their courage in compiling the material in order to bring this hideous crime to light and shed more understanding on how best to respond and provide support to survivors of rape and abuse. Professionals and lay bystanders alike both need this book and will find it useful. It is, however, not an easy read as the topic is itself a confronting one and unfortunately, those who will enthusiastically pick it up may be those already passionate about being advocates. And therein lies a huge part of the problem - people don't want to know. That's why this book is needed. Hopefully, the intended target of readers will take this issue as seriously as this book has argued it should be taken.
1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A Fantastic New Resource. Nov. 11 2013
By Carz - Published on Amazon.com
Format:Paperback
This book helps to move the focus of IPSV from the seminal studies of the 1980s and 1990s where the issue was defined to a place where the need for services isn't questioned. The editors have drawn together a number of international professionals who provide insight on many issues that need to be considered when discussing Intimate Partner Sexual Violence, providing real advice for other professionals and services. They reinforcing the need for IPSV specific consideration by a wide range of service providers they also remind us that IPSV victims are not a homogeneous group covered by a 'one size fits all' approach, and give advice for working with teens, immigrants, and people from the LGBT community.

As a student this book provides an amazing array of current information about an issue that still needs a lot of research and consideration. Well researched and well referenced it provides a starting point if one chooses to look closer at a specific issue related to IPSV.

Look for similar items by category