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Introduction to 3D Game Programming with DirectX 11 Paperback – Feb 28 2012

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Product Details

  • Paperback: 600 pages
  • Publisher: Mercury Learning & Information; Pap/DVD edition (Feb. 28 2012)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1936420228
  • ISBN-13: 978-1936420223
  • Product Dimensions: 5.1 x 17.8 x 22.9 cm
  • Shipping Weight: 1.4 Kg
  • Average Customer Review: 4.5 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (2 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: #96,443 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)
  • See Complete Table of Contents

Product Description


With the latest developmental tools, one can create wonderful and vivid worlds. "3D Game Programming with DirectX 11" elaborates on how to get the most out the DirectX tools, the processes used by many recent 3D game developers. Frank D. Luna explores the newest developments that come with this edition of DirectX, how to make the most of 3D lighting, texturing, reflections, animation, and other vital elements. With exercises to practice with the ideas within, and a DVD with further resources and lessons, "3D Game Programming with DirectX 11" is a strong pick for anyone seeking to further their skills, be it for their career or as a hobby.

About the Author

Frank Luna is a software engineer for medical devices. He has been programming interactive 3D graphics for more than ten years and has been using DirectX since v5. He is the author of three bestselling books on DirectX and lives in San Diego.

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Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
I'm just starting to learn DirectX11 and I've found this book to be a great introduction. It goes into a lot of detail, especially in what the functions are for and the math behind it all. Before I read this book I did go through a different textbook that was more of a high-level overview, so it made this book easier to digest.
The examples in the book all work for me, though I did have to do some modifications to the code so it would run on a DirectX10 graphics card. I would recommend this book to anyone learning DirectX11 for the first time.
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By Juan Diego Uran on Sept. 13 2015
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
good book!
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Most Helpful Customer Reviews on (beta) 51 reviews
30 of 31 people found the following review helpful
Buy It! March 18 2012
By CoffinNailVGD - Published on
Format: Paperback
If you have bought Mr. Luna's DX books in the past and are considering whether to buy the new one, I say the $50 is well worth it. I have been going over the DX11 documentation for some time now and the book has done more for me in a week that the documentation did in 4 months. DX11 has made a huge jump, compared to DX9 to DX10, and there are several new chapters to cover those changes, along with revisions to existing chapters.

If this is your first foray into 3D programming, and you have decided on the DirectX route, this is the book to buy! I have struggled through one other DX10 book and it is by far inferior compared to Frank's book. It was also written in C which does have some subtle but important differences in code structure.

Make sure your C++ skillz are up to snuff. The text doesn't take the time to tell you what a pointer is or the difference between a struct and a class. You should also be pretty familiar with linear algebra though the text does give a little refresher on it if you are rusty. It also wouldn't hurt to look at some Win32 programming stuff.

I give it 5/5 stars, A+ or two thumbs up, which ever rating system you prefer. What I am saying is buy this book, if it ever becomes available again :D
9 of 9 people found the following review helpful
A Jump Start Nov. 11 2012
By Evelio M. Segura - Published on
Format: Paperback
I want to start by first saying that before this book, I knew nada (nothing) about 3D Programming. With this book not only I have learned about 3d programming but also have learned about an API that lets me 3D program.

I will not lie though, the book is not easy, but then again 3d programming is a difficult subject.

*Very detailed explanations on every subject. From the math to how a 3d object is represented by triangles goes into very detail. The author takes time to explain everything he considers relevant for a beginner to know and the other not so relevant stuff he points you on the right direction.

*I think the math involved with the camera code could be simplified a little more. I got very confused in this area and almost gave up on the whole book. Thank god I didn't though.

*In chapter 7 the author talks about deferred rendering and how this subject will be talked about in a later chapter, well, I'm on chapter 20 and have not seen one line referring back to this. I doubt it he talks about it in the last 4 chapters since they do not focus on lighting.

*The author sometimes tries to make things a little too rigorous when they could be explained in much simpler terms. For example, the chapter on lighting could use less function graphs and charts and more to the point explanations. Granted that lighting isn't the easiest thing in the world.

Pro or Con? You decide:
*I got the book in the beginning of May and I am just about to finish it. It takes sometime to read, depending on how much time you're dedicating to it of course.

*The format the author uses to load mesh objects onto directx did not sit well with me. But since this is my opinion I will let you be the judge of that.

*Also, I would've loved it if the author would've kept away from the Effects library. Or at least dedicate 1 chapter to NOT using it. For example, teach the reader how to compile shaders and set shaders, how to manage constant buffers and so on. Don't get me wrong the effects library does more than a decent job, but after using other resources to learn how to manage constant buffers without it, I think it would've been better if he didn't use it.

Now, you probably notice there are not too many pros and many more cons, and that I'm still giving this book a 5 star rating. Well, this is the reason:

If it wasn't for this book I would still be wondering where should I start if I want to learn graphics programming, what is the difference between OGL and DX, and so many more questions that are too many to list. This book has given me a "jump start" in my game coding career, from how to program to many best practices. I couldn't thank the author enough for such a master piece. And finally, there is not any other book out there that can even be compared to this one, for both OpenGl and DirectX. If you are like me and have found yourself in a crossroad, get this one, and then you will see how thankful you will be with the author too.

DirectX is just an API, so after reading this book you can very easily go to OpenGL and with a few changes here and there pick it up extremely fast (like I did). It took me a day of reading a horrible book about opengl to understand it as much as I understand direct x, thanks to the base that this book gave me.

After reading this book buy your self a copy of Game Coding Complete (4th edition now, I think!), and you my friend are about 20,000 steps closer to becoming a professional game programmer.

EDIT 1, DEC 06 2012:

I know I recommended people to buy Game Coding Complete after this book, but I actually have a better recommendation, C++ For Game Programmers (Game Development Series).

Don't get me wrong GCC is an excellent book and I'm still reading it, but it is just too windows oriented. In my humble beginner's opinion; if you want to target the largest amount of users, you have to let "the largest amount of users" play your game, and what better way of accomplishing this than by letting ALL the users play your game. This is where C++ Game Programming comes in. This game gives you the basics(and points you to the advance) on how to truly decouple your game, making it a breeze releasing it to different platforms.

PS. Believe it or not, I actually have not written a review of that book as of today. Procrastination....what am I going to do with you!?
9 of 9 people found the following review helpful
This is the Direct3D 11 book, the search is over. July 18 2012
By sidewinder128 - Published on
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
I just got the book yesterday, I already read half and I passed quickly the other half.

I will tell you this, This Book ROCKS!. Frank D. Luna is awesome author and he knows how to teach 3D Graphics and Direct3D. It uses plain Direct3D API, Not engines or wrappers as other books.

You know 3D graphics is all maths but it does not need to be a rocket science to understand those maths so the author before explain a topic he gives you a simple, easy math crash course of each topic so we can understand much better how to apply it to our 3D graphics and using Direct3D. The book is very easy to follow as I said the author is a real teacher.

The examples are very clear and very easy to follow, even we have an example on how to load a skeletal character with animation. Other Topics the book includes with examples are Cameras, Shaders, Terrain rendering, hardware tessellation, ambient occlusion, textures, lights, particles, frustum culling, Meshes, Character Animation well all the goodies of Direct3D 11.

This book is the Direct3D 11 book and as I said the search is over, Get this book now!.
5 of 5 people found the following review helpful
Not good for people who want to write their own code Feb. 8 2015
By YazX - Published on
Format: Paperback
to keep it short, this book doesnt provide full examples and code for you to execute and learn, they provided their own classes and code and they use to inherit from these classes throughout the book, in terms of programming concepts, its excellent and the right thing to do, but this is a book for starters to learn, it leaves you confused with which one is the actual API method/classes and which one is their own classes and methods.

A book like this should always use API code even if its repetitive and thats the sole purpose of writing books for people to learn and write the same code over and over in order for them to get familiar with D3D APIs, and also it should provide a full working examples not just random pieces of code here and there and then use/import his own classes, at least at the end of every chapter he should have merged all pieces into one working piece so you can write and execute.

The other problem is this book starts from bottom to top then top to bottom, you should start from making window and how to handle window messages first, then you jump to D3D rendering pipeline, in every piece of code, the author just writes the function and parameters, and then says we will get to that parameter later in later chapters, so it leaves you confused and and all pieces are fragmented and not in correct order.
6 of 7 people found the following review helpful
Quickly deprecated unfortunately March 18 2014
By Richard Marinaccio - Published on
Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
Luna's books are all great, but in this case Microsoft pulled the rug out from him soon after the books release. The entire effects framework used in the book is now deprecated. There are complicated steps that you can take to compile the examples, but you are then left with mixing versions of Direct X libraries in a way that is very confusing for beginners, which this book was written for. It is unfortunate because there is a lot of good, relevant material in the book.