Introduction to Information Retrieval and over one million other books are available for Amazon Kindle. Learn more
CDN$ 57.56
  • List Price: CDN$ 71.95
  • You Save: CDN$ 14.39 (20%)
Only 1 left in stock (more on the way).
Ships from and sold by Amazon.ca.
Gift-wrap available.
Quantity:1
Add to Cart
Have one to sell?
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more

Introduction to Information Retrieval Hardcover – Jul 7 2008


Amazon Price New from Used from
Kindle Edition
"Please retry"
Hardcover
"Please retry"
CDN$ 57.56
CDN$ 57.56 CDN$ 46.46

Join Amazon Student in Canada



Customers Who Bought This Item Also Bought

NO_CONTENT_IN_FEATURE

Product Details

  • Hardcover: 496 pages
  • Publisher: Cambridge University Press (July 7 2008)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0521865719
  • ISBN-13: 978-0521865715
  • Product Dimensions: 25.7 x 17.8 x 3 cm
  • Shipping Weight: 1 Kg
  • Average Customer Review: 4.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (1 customer review)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: #132,104 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)
  • See Complete Table of Contents


Inside This Book (Learn More)
Browse Sample Pages
Front Cover | Copyright | Table of Contents | Excerpt | Index
Search inside this book:

Customer Reviews

4.0 out of 5 stars
5 star
0
4 star
1
3 star
0
2 star
0
1 star
0
See the customer review
Share your thoughts with other customers

Most helpful customer reviews

By Jonathan Brunette on Sept. 30 2009
Format: Hardcover
Book is well written and has many online references and exercises.

Easy to read and allows for quick learning.
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again.

Most Helpful Customer Reviews on Amazon.com (beta)

Amazon.com: 19 reviews
30 of 31 people found the following review helpful
Great Stuff Aug. 22 2008
By Devabhaktuni Srikrishna - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Hardcover
I am a big fan of the authors 1999 book on Statistical Natural Language Processing, and I and was thrilled when I found this new book online -- just search for "Information Retrieval" on Google.

In these two books, they describe the theory behind a vast toolbox which can be used to construct new tools/products for the Internet. Now I can go back to them when the need arises.

For starters, I appreciate the detailed theoretical explanations of topics that I could not find in other texts, and the references to related work are especially helpful. One of the other books I read was Information Retrieval by Grossman, which is an older book but has a more condensed style compared to this. Grossman's discussion of clustering was more high level and referenced a few more papers that I found useful. That helped increase my interest to read through these chapters in which offer greater detail.

Before I felt like I could place each topic in its appropriate context, I had to spend six months of reading both the books, playing with code and finding s/w packages, searching the research literature, reading papers and other books, and then cycling back to the books. Here's are some suggestions for things I'd like to see:

1. A set of recomended programming tools: in some books on Perl -- such as the chapter "Natural Language Tools" in pages 149-171 in "Advanced Perl Programming" by Simon Cozens (O'Reilly) -- you get a very "quick & dirty" introduction to maybe 20-30% of the concepts in these two books along with ways to implement and play around with them. Although Perl has many natural language processing tools, the Cozens book cuts to the chase, explains which are the best tools, and shows you how to use them. I think knowing such shortcuts aids in learning how to apply and improve on them. The more complex and sophisticated topics, the more likely to make it out into the real world if they are easy to play with.

2. More data/examples on what does/doesn't work with end-users: Numbers, graphs, and charts are all good stuff. I always appreciate it when the authors referenced quantitative comparisons, real-world products, and history of Internet. One of the reasons I had to consult the research literature was to broaden my understanding of quantitative comparisons between different techniques involving end-users, which were typically done in the context of complete systems studies that users could try out.

Thanks,
-Sri
15 of 15 people found the following review helpful
My new favorite book on search Feb. 6 2009
By Amazon Customer - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
Managing Gigabytes used to be my favorite book on search, but it is getting quite dated as this point. This new book is by three search gurus, Chris Manning, Prabhakar Raghavan (head of Yahoo Research), and Hinrich Schutze, and the depth of their expertise shows.

This book not only describes how to build a search engine (including crawling, indexing, ranking, classification, and clustering), but also has many of the insights you can only get from lengthy experience using these techniques at large scale.

Definitely my new favorite book on search. If you work in search or just have an interest in the field, it is a great read.
9 of 9 people found the following review helpful
Good for corpus linguists too Sept. 25 2010
By K. Parent - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
I have no desire to build an internet search engine, so I'm not the target audience. However, I do work with large corpora, some of which are unindexed. When one search I programmed (in R) took 14 hours to complete (this after one attempt produced unusable results due to a bug and another crashed twelve hours in due to the power saver mode kicking in), I knew I had to find a better way.

I knew from the free sample that this book was what I was looking for. Thinking this would be a completely a new field to me, I was surprised how much I already knew. Some of it is not relevant to corpus linguists (result ranking for example), but if you're a corpus linguist and want to build an index for your corpus, I doubt you'll find a better book than this.

And the Kindle edition is done well, which is not always the case. Websites are hyperlinked and you can jump to the next or previous section with the 5-way controller.
7 of 7 people found the following review helpful
nice book! Sept. 17 2008
By S. Oh - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
Although i'm a newbie in information retrieval field (I'm more of a machine learning, computer vision, timeseries person),
I like the book most for the following two reasons :
(1) detailed explanation into the level of implementation in many cases (data structures//memory size etc..)
(2) good review on practice vs. theory. The authors present diverse attractive theories, and on the other hand, discusses why sometimes just simpler methods are hard to be beaten down by those more complicated methods from their experience in practice.

I like that!
4 of 4 people found the following review helpful
An excelent buy Sept. 2 2008
By Nestor Moreira Quijano - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
This is my first book about information retrieval, and I think that is perfect! The book cover all the modern topics in the information retrieval field. It's very clear and really simple to understand.
Great book!
Congratulations to the authors!

Product Images from Customers

Search


Feedback