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The Invention of Morel Paperback – Aug 31 2003


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Product Details

  • Paperback: 120 pages
  • Publisher: NYRB Classics (Aug. 31 2003)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1590170571
  • ISBN-13: 978-1590170571
  • Product Dimensions: 20.3 x 13.2 x 0.8 cm
  • Shipping Weight: 136 g
  • Average Customer Review: 4.3 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (3 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: #108,436 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)


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TODAY, on this island, a miracle happened: summer came ahead of time. Read the first page
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Most helpful customer reviews

Format: Paperback
I've never read anything like this. This little book is on another level, in its own league - its own universe, really - of literary beauty and ingenuity. Picture a science fiction-meets-fantasy-meets-love story, written by Bioy Casares, in 1940. Jorge Luis Borges - himself one of the most imaginative writers known today - felt it could, without exaggeration, be called 'the perfect novel'. Written in the first person from the perspective of an anonymous fugitive having escaped to a deserted island, the story depicts his strange sights and experiences there, and his journey in ascertaining their cause.

The emphasis on Louise Brooks is, I think, overstated (the NYRB edition of this work also portrays Brooks on the cover - I think this is a somewhat misleading representation of this strange but boldly evocative book, its setting, its literary style - in a word, everything). While Casares' admiration of Brooks did purportedly serve as the inspiration for the relationship between the protagonist and the central female character of the story, that is where the association ends - there is no resemblance whatsoever between Brooks and the enigmatic, empty female character in the novel, who can really be seen as an extension of the bizarre, dream-like and singular world that Casares has masterfully created. Obsessions and intrigues with hollywood actors have become trite in our culture, and dwelling too much on an author's infatuation with an actress has in this case detracted from Bioy-Casares' awe-inspiring talent in penning a story fearlessly imaginative and truly original, communicated through the stark and near-painful self-awareness of its protagonist.
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By Gulley Jimson on Dec 16 2003
Format: Paperback
I picked up this book because of the rather extravagant praise from Borges and Paz. Apparently it was inspired by the silent film star Louise Brooks, which makes sense: the entire book is about our capacity to love phantoms. All of us probably remember early infatuations with celebrities who never existed for us as anything but reproductions: on paper, televisions, the movie screen.
Essentially, this book imagines what happens when the reproductions become faithful enough to be indistinguishable from the real thing. It is narrated by a man hiding from the police on a deserted island for an undisclosed crime. One day people appear, and the man quickly falls in love with one of the women; strangely enough, they often disappear for short stretches of time, and seem to repeat the same conversations and actions again and again.
All of this is well-written, but when the explanation is given, all that preceded seems to have been time spent waiting for the a-ha twist: it's only after this point that the book becomes really interesting. I won't give away the story, because the plot is worth getting through yourself: let me mention something that it reminded me of, though.
When Apocalypse Now: Redux came out, they restored scenes of Martin Sheen's brief love affair with a French woman on the river, a storyline completely left out of the original cut. The actress, now an old woman, went to the theatres and saw herself young and beautiful again. And something about her youth is now eternal, or at least as eternal as film proves to be.
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By Jay Dickson on Sept. 20 2003
Format: Paperback
Bioy's masterpiece really is a wonderful "unknown masterpiece" (albeit unknown only in the USA) reissued by the NYRB editors. Inspired by Bioy's obsession with the silent movie actress Louise Brooks, THE INVENTION OF MOREL is a tour de force and exceptionally prescient study of the nature of reality and how it is impinged upon by the virtual realities engendered by time, fantasy, and love. And it is genuinely heartbreaking.
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Most Helpful Customer Reviews on Amazon.com (beta)

Amazon.com: 30 reviews
50 of 64 people found the following review helpful
a good book Dec 16 2003
By Gulley Jimson - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Paperback
I picked up this book because of the rather extravagant praise from Borges and Paz. Apparently it was inspired by the silent film star Louise Brooks, which makes sense: the entire book is about our capacity to love phantoms. All of us probably remember early infatuations with celebrities who never existed for us as anything but reproductions: on paper, televisions, the movie screen.
Essentially, this book imagines what happens when the reproductions become faithful enough to be indistinguishable from the real thing. It is narrated by a man hiding from the police on a deserted island for an undisclosed crime. One day people appear, and the man quickly falls in love with one of the women; strangely enough, they often disappear for short stretches of time, and seem to repeat the same conversations and actions again and again.
All of this is well-written, but when the explanation is given, all that preceded seems to have been time spent waiting for the a-ha twist: it's only after this point that the book becomes really interesting. I won't give away the story, because the plot is worth getting through yourself: let me mention something that it reminded me of, though.
When Apocalypse Now: Redux came out, they restored scenes of Martin Sheen's brief love affair with a French woman on the river, a storyline completely left out of the original cut. The actress, now an old woman, went to the theatres and saw herself young and beautiful again. And something about her youth is now eternal, or at least as eternal as film proves to be.
I find it completely plausible, for example, that one could find a bundle of old home videos and be so charmed by a woman in them (since I'm a man) that you fall in (some sort of) love with her, even though she is probably either dead now or a completely different woman. But in some way the image of her is real, in the sense that it exists on the tapes and in your own head.
These are some of the ideas that this book plays with and, I must say, it is more fascinating for the ideas it provokes than the narrative itself. In many ways, it feels like second-rate Borges: The Circular Ruins (or a few other stories) stretched to novella length. What Casares should have accomplished with this length is given Faustine (the woman) some sort of character that seemed worthy of the reader's love, and not just the narrator's. At the moment she's a non-entity.
So this story isn't heartbreaking, as the other reviewer (whose flimsy review, frankly, shows no evidence that he actually read the book) tries to say. The Invention of Morel is the work of a talented but not brilliant writer. Perhaps another flaw of this book is that the ideal medium for the story seems to be film; I can see why this was, supposedly, the inspiration for Last Year at Marienbad.
In any case, if these ideas strike you as interesting, I recommend this book. It's really very short, and perhaps not worth paying this much for, since I wouldn't care to have it as part of my permanent collection; I read it first in the library, where it had several short stories from Bioy (NYRB might have included those) as well as several lovely woodcut illustrations.
13 of 15 people found the following review helpful
The Ghost of Lulu July 2 2008
By lili - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Paperback
The cover picture and the blurb on the back indicate that Louise Brooks had something to do with it all....And so, knowing this, I brought what I knew of LB to my reading of 'The Invention of Morel'. As a result, I don't find fault with the character development (as other reviews here do) - why should I? This tale is about the elusive nature of beauty, the mystery of cinema, the hard to pin down quality of a great silent movie actress. To imagine what the narrator experiences - the coming to life of someone who's charisma and beauty resembles that of Louise Brooks - against the backdrop of a strange island, the eerie repetitious jazz music on the phonograph, the at once lush and deadened landscape - is descriptive enough. The narrator never knows the characters - Half-crazed, he doesn't even know himself! This is an absolutely brilliant, highly atmospheric tale.
7 of 8 people found the following review helpful
Intricate and Strange Psychological Thriller July 5 2009
By John J. Coyne - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Paperback
A character who could be straight out of Borges's "Universal History of Iniquities" takes refuge from the law on a deserted tropical island where he witnesses some pretty strange stuff (I'm trying to be vague here). What seems to begin as the story of a man's slow descent into paranoia turns into what seems like a ghost story before eventually becoming something entirely different - something that could have sprung from the mind of Gene Wolfe or Philip K. Dick on a good day.
7 of 9 people found the following review helpful
Behind the Eternity Aug. 22 2008
By nemo galletti - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Paperback
This novel is a metaphor about interpersonal communications, and tells about the transformation of an individual trying to be accepted by a society to which -initially- he doesn't belong. It is based on a wonderful idea, that in my opinion is enough to classify this book as a masterpiece, even if the writing style is not particularly rich. The book has two different layers: its appearance and its not-openly disclosed messages. The appearance is an intriguing novel based on a sci-fi type of idea: a fugitive man escapes to an island populated by people that are totally not interested in him. His initial fear and attempts to hide from them slowly transforms into his desperate wish to interact with them, pushing him up to the final limit when, understood that the people are inanimate, endless cyclic tridimensional representation of a party that happened years before (and that, due to the radiations ejected by the special movie camera used, lead to the death of their actors) the man sacrifice his own life by simulating being one of the group, filming himself with the special cameras and preparing to die for that.
This may be read as a metaphor of the compromises that we accept in order to be part of a society: in the end our feelings, our dreams, our goals are only representations and, when we are finally part of it, our individuality expires.
1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
Must read for Goths -A wonderful novella that surpasses O'Henry and challenges Kafka Nov. 12 2012
By Phred - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
Another reviewer hit it exactly right. Any deep or lengthily review risks too much info. One small teaser. The name of this book is a nod to the story: The Island of Dr. Moreau

I cannot exactly agree with those who talk too much about Louise Brooks or silent movies. George Louis Borges fans may want to read this to get a deeper appreciation for Argentine literature. Psychological thriller may be the right category. And none of this matters.

The basis for my five stars is my respect for the writer's skill in taking such deliberate control of me. Exactly as I was ready to toss this aside as a book aping early 20th century symbolist - questions without answers novellas; Adolofo Casares took me back in hand, answered all questions Then teased me some more.

In this edition the text is barely 100 pages, plus a wonderful intro by Borges and some lovely black and white drawings by Norah Borges De Torre.
Ultimately, this is a tightly written suspenseful mystery with no cheating. The late Casares is worth your time and attention.

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