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Istanbul to Cairo Paperback – Feb 1 2000


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Product Details

  • Paperback: 512 pages
  • Publisher: Lonely Planet Publications (Feb. 1 2000)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0864427492
  • ISBN-13: 978-0864427496
  • Product Dimensions: 19.7 x 12.9 x 2.7 cm
  • Shipping Weight: 531 g
  • Average Customer Review: 3.8 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (6 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: #1,039,237 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Product Description

Review

'Lonely Planet books speak the language of youthful, independent, tourist-trap-avoiding travellers'

-- Sports Illustrated


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First Sentence
The Middle East can make a strong claim to being the birthplace of civilisation. Read the first page
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Front Cover | Copyright | Table of Contents | Excerpt | Index | Back Cover
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Customer Reviews

3.8 out of 5 stars
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Most helpful customer reviews

1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Wyote on Aug. 26 2001
Format: Paperback
This book outlines an excellent journey from Istanbul to Cairo, with all the detail and information we expect from Lonely Planet. The only problem emerges if you want to take a different route than the one they've outlined. They make hardly any allowance for this possibility, and this is the book's fatal flaw. Use it as a suggestion book, as a guide; but consider buying a guide to the Middle East instead, and thus providing yourself with much more information on the places between Istanbul and Cairo, places you may want to visit even though they're "off the beaten track." For instance, with more information I chose to go South through Jordan, ferry to Egypt, and then go back North into Israel, ending in Jerusalem. This made sites such as Petra in Jordan and St. Anthony's Monastery in Egypt fit nicely on the itinerary, and for me ending in Jerusalem provided a more fitting climax. No one trip can fit everyone. Whatever your desires, consider a guidebook that presents more options. Make sure you include Istanbul, Ephesus, Damascus, Baalbek, Beirut, Petra, Jerusalem, Cairo. Strongly consider Nazareth, Haifa, Luxor, and Mt. Sinai. Have fun!
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By Wyote on Aug. 26 2001
Format: Paperback
This book outlines an excellent journey from Istanbul to Cairo, with all the detail and information we expect from Lonely Planet. The only problem emerges if you want to take a different route than the one they've outlined. They make hardly any allowance for this possibility, and this is the book's fatal flaw. Use it as a suggestion book, as a guide; but consider buying a guide to the Middle East instead, and thus providing yourself with much more information on the places between Istanbul and Cairo, places you may want to visit even though they're "off the beaten track."
For instance, with more information I chose to go south through Jordan, ferry to Egypt, and then go back north into Israel, ending in Jerusalem. This made sites such as Petra in Jordan and St. Anthony's Monastery in Egypt fit nicely on the itinerary, and for me ending in Jerusalem provided a more fitting climax. No one trip can fit everyone. Whatever your desires, consider a guidebook that presents more options.
----UPDATE: I didn't take that trip actually; but I think the principle is still valid! Design your own trip! Lonely Planet's general guide to the Middle East is not bad.
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By A Customer on April 11 2001
Format: Paperback
I used this book for Israel and Jordan. I liked the layout and found it useful. The entries for each country are basically abbreviated versions of Lonely Planet's single-country books. Instead of giving it five starts, I'm giving it only four because I usually found the city maps to be deplorable. These maps are more like sketches than real maps. The main problem is that all the city streets are not on the maps, and the steets that are there often don't have their names. This makes it impossible to orient oneself when lost, and it is very difficult to find something marked on a steet that has no name on the map and located amidst other streets that aren't on the map. I realized I was not alone in this appraisal when I went to the tourist information office in Eilat, Israel. I asked where a bicycle shop was and asked the man to show me where it was on Lonely Planet's map. He glanced at the map and had obviously seen it before because he gave a disgusted grunt and brushed the book aside saying, "That's not a map," and proceeded to give me verbal directions.
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