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JEROME AND THE SERAPH-OP [Paperback]

Robina Williams
4.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (3 customer reviews)

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Book Description

January 2002
Brother Jerome's death came as a surprise to him. So did the afterworld. There were no cherubs, no harps, no fluffy white clouds. Jerome had pictured the afterworld as a traditional sort of place.

Leo, Jerome's pet cat from the friary, turns up to say hello -- literally. Jerome is shocked, for he hadn't known that the cat could talk. Nor had he known the cat's real name was Quantuum -- "You can call me Quant," the cat says to Jerome.

Is Quant dead or alive? Jerome doesn't know, for Quant still lives in the friary, yet he pops along, as if through an interdimensional catflap, to see his friend in the afterworld. What is Quant? Jerome hasn't a clue.

And what is this strange world he's now in? Is it a new world or an old world? The Hound of Heaven is here, the Christian friars are here, but so are the centaurs and the Greek gods. And everyone seems to get along together just fine.


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5.0 out of 5 stars Brilliant Novel March 12 2005
Format:Paperback
The concept of life after death has plagued the human mind since self-awareness dawned upon it. To exist here in our world, bathed in the complexities of life, to then fall into a black abyss is intolerable. Far better to go to a place where peace and beauty are the mainstays of existence.
Life can sometimes take unexpected turns and throw one into the realms of the psyche not known to exist. So it was with young Father Jerome. Taken from his fellow friars by a bizarre twist of fate.
Slipping on some iced grass, Jerome hit his head on a gravestone. The weird part of this was whom the gravestone belonged to. It was in memory of Father Aloysius, a long time member of the Friary.
He had just passed on and was fresh in his grave. Jerome was attending the burial when he slipped. Now he found himself interned in the same grave, which he felt was rather comical.
This one fatal slip now gave him an opening to understanding how life and death functioned. He found himself in strange place known as the afterworld. The first person he saw in his new home was Father Aloysius.
It seemed the old Friar was most upset that his burial was the cause of Jerome's early passing. Jerome did not place any blame on Aloysius for his death; it was just an unfortunate accident. What puzzled him was that he still felt alive and that Leo, the Friary cat, whom he knew was not dead, existed in the afterworld too.
Leo, whose real name was Quant, introduced Jerome to a new existence. It was one that both frustrated and frightened the young Friar. All that he knew of physics and the world of the living, he found now turned upon itself.
Quant showed him how to travel from the land of the dead to the land of the living.
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5.0 out of 5 stars Highly Recommended for the whole family Dec 8 2004
Format:Paperback
Genre: Fantasy/Literary
Jerome and the Seraph
AUTHOR: robina williams
Brother Jerome slips in the graveyard, hitting his head with a thud. Later he finds himself in a rather strange place accompanied by a dear old friend that he knows is deceased. The situation is most abstruse as there are no cherubs, no angels, no fluffy clouds- none of his expectations of beyond; he soon accedes to his irreversible situation. His greatest surprise is the arrival of his beloved cat, Leo in the afterworld. Leo, who we learn is actually Quant, the cat/lion alter ego, it seems, can travel at will between the two worlds being both alive and dead.
Jerome's ingrained beliefs are challenged, as he learns the answers to life long spiritual questions. He comes face to face with the hound of Heaven as the trill of Pan's flute fills the air.
Brother Jerome and his cohorts, both living and dead are most enchanting characters. Full of human frailties and believable character flaws, they charm the reader with their humorous encounters and escapades.
The author makes reference to several nineteenth century paintings including St. Jerome in the Wilderness, adding a touch of refinement and artistic interest to the book. Amusing, entertaining and charming, Robina Williams has a winner with her bumbling friar and his amazing ginger.
The author lives in north- west England and has an M.A in Modern Languages. This book is the first in the Quantum cat series; she has finished her second book Angelos and is working on the third.
Highly recommended, this reviewer looks forward to the next book in the series. Shirley Roe, Allbooks Reviews.
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2.0 out of 5 stars Good idea Jan. 3 2014
By Bob TOP 1000 REVIEWER
Format:Kindle Edition
This starts so well with a friar being killed in an accident and then reaches the afterlife, the idea is good and would work well if there was a plot that lead anywhere, unfortunately after this very little happens, it is a well written story with the characters and locations being well described but the story could almost be the day by day story of dead and alive friars and a cat that that can talk to the dead. The other thing that I do not like is that this seems to be a serial, I don't mind series where books can be read as a standalone but this one just stops and probably continues in the next of the books. I will read the next one but only if it is a free download.
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Most Helpful Customer Reviews on Amazon.com (beta)
Amazon.com: 3.9 out of 5 stars  29 reviews
23 of 23 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Jerome and the Seraph July 5 2005
By AK - Published on Amazon.com
Format:Paperback
Many people wonder what people will say about them at their funeral. Jerome, an ill fated young friar, gets the chance to find out; however for him, death is just the start of something larger. Following his move to the spiritual plane, Jerome is befriended by the ginger tom cat he was kind to in life. After the cat tells the young man that his true name is not Leo but Quant and animals all talk in that world, Quant shows him how to move between worlds. Jerome now has the opportunity to learn about the world presently inhabits as well as the material one. He sees he was not as essential as the imagined to the little abbey, and to learn that his brothers are more dimensional than he believed. No one is either as good or bad as he perceived in life, nor is his role at the abbey completely finished.

*** For making complex concepts comprehensible and entertaining to the average reader, this story is to be commended. The simplistic style could be read by a child, but it does not condescend to the audience. However, Christians who adhere to the reformed doctrines or fundamental Christianity will find the universalism advocated by the author to be a weak point in the inspirational aspect of the story. ***

Reviewed by Amanda Killgore, Freelance Reviewer.
9 of 9 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Wow, what a topic! May 19 2005
By Jack W. Regan - Published on Amazon.com
Format:Paperback
Wow, what a topic! In "Jerome and the Seraph," author Robina Williams assumes a heavy responsibility by exploring the unknown complexities of the afterlife and does so in an admirable fashion. The human mind, being what it is, has always yearned to know more about life after death and, even if Robina Williams' portrayal of it does not match your own concept, you will be plagued throughout the book by the interminable "what if" syndrome.

Brother Jerome, who lives in an English friary, slips on some frozen grass and dies when his head strikes the gravestone of Father Aloysius, who had only recently passed on himself. Imagine Jerome's surprise when he realizes he is dead and that it is nothing like he expected. The first person he sees is Father Aloysius, who apologizes profusely for Jerome's untimely death. Jerome's response is classic, "That's all right, Al. These things happen."

"Jerome and the Seraph" is a book that is different from any other I have read to this point. Those expecting a rollercoaster ride of exciting events and imminent danger will be disappointed, for that is not the heart of this book. It is not about action, but discovery and realization, as Brother Jerome is forced to put aside his preconceived ideas and begins to understand the afterlife for himself.

Even though "Jerome and the Seraph" was not exactly the kind of book I might choose to read on my own, Robina Williams managed to win me over in the end. A fine writer, she weaves the story with a deft hand. One thing I most admire about this book is the many, varied characters that inhabit its pages. To a person, they are fully dimensional and possess individual traits that bring them alive for the reader. I award this book 4 out of 5 stars.

Craig Hart - CraigHart.net
7 of 7 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Brilliant Novel March 12 2005
By W. A. Thurston - Published on Amazon.com
Format:Paperback
The concept of life after death has plagued the human mind since self-awareness dawned upon it. To exist here in our world, bathed in the complexities of life, to then fall into a black abyss is intolerable. Far better to go to a place where peace and beauty are the mainstays of existence.
Life can sometimes take unexpected turns and throw one into the realms of the psyche not known to exist. So it was with young Father Jerome. Taken from his fellow friars by a bizarre twist of fate.
Slipping on some iced grass, Jerome hit his head on a gravestone. The weird part of this was whom the gravestone belonged to. It was in memory of Father Aloysius, a long time member of the Friary.
He had just passed on and was fresh in his grave. Jerome was attending the burial when he slipped. Now he found himself interned in the same grave, which he felt was rather comical.
This one fatal slip now gave him an opening to understanding how life and death functioned. He found himself in strange place known as the afterworld. The first person he saw in his new home was Father Aloysius.
It seemed the old Friar was most upset that his burial was the cause of Jerome's early passing. Jerome did not place any blame on Aloysius for his death; it was just an unfortunate accident. What puzzled him was that he still felt alive and that Leo, the Friary cat, whom he knew was not dead, existed in the afterworld too.
Leo, whose real name was Quant, introduced Jerome to a new existence. It was one that both frustrated and frightened the young Friar. All that he knew of physics and the world of the living, he found now turned upon itself.
Quant showed him how to travel from the land of the dead to the land of the living. Jerome discovered the dead are not dead but lived on as functioning beings in the afterworld. As did the old gods of the classic period, whose function to provide an explanation of life was gone, replaced by a deeper meaning.
Jerome finally gets to master the problems of traveling between one world and the next. He agrees to go on a spy mission for Brother Bernard. The mission is not what one would call an overwhelming success but it does lead into an interesting finale to the book.
It gives the reader a look at the inner turmoil one of the story's main antagonists, Father Fidelis. A man seen as an autocrat with a grudge against anything that brings pleasure. Yet the tough outer shell hides a quivering fragility of doubt and weakness. It is a part of Fidelis that Jerome was never aware of when part of the real world.
Robina Williams has raised the mystique of fantasy to a new level. She has created a world that uplifts the reader to understand with clarity, the questions many of us ask about what happens when we leave this world. Her crafting of the plot and the creation of the characters is brilliant. I really enjoyed reading the book and feel more knowledgeable about myself because of it.
If you are looking for a book that entertains, provokes deep thinking and gives a sense of satisfaction, then look no further. Jerome and the Seraph is indeed a truly wonderful book.
1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars very interesting fantasy Oct. 29 2006
By Paul Lappen - Published on Amazon.com
Format:Paperback
At a rural friary in Britain, Brother Jerome slips and cracks his head open on the gravestone of Brother Aloysius. Jerome is killed instantly. When he wakes up, he is not in Heaven, but alone in a gray, featureless sort of place. The first person he meets is Brother Aloysius, who apologizes for the circumstances of Jerome's death. Jerome eventually meets up with all the dead Brothers of the friary. The "leader" or "guide" of the group is Leo, an orange tabby cat who wandered into the friary one day and made himself at home. In the other world, Leo is named Quant, short for Quantum, and can talk. Jerome realizes that Leo/Quant is not your average cat, if he can move between dimensions with no trouble at all.

Meantime, back at the friary, Brother Fidelis, the "boss" of the friary, has been spending a lot of time with a middle age woman new to the parish. When men become friars later in life, some are good at keeping their religious vows while others are not so good at it. By this time, Jerome has made a few visits back to the friary. He makes contact with one of the living friars, and is asked if he could possibly find himself inside the woman's cottage while Fidelis is there; just for a peek, of course. He does, and finds a totally innocent scene of two people at lunch. Whether or not Jerome can be seen by the living friars on his walks around the friary seems to depend on the cat, Leo/Quant. A lot of things seem to depend on that dimension-hopping cat.

This is a very "quiet" novel (set at a friary, there will not be much in the way of action). It has little bits of weirdness here and there that will keep the reader interested. This belongs in that large gray area of Pretty Good or Worth Reading.
1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars wonderful fantasy April 30 2005
By Harriet Klausner - Published on Amazon.com
Format:Paperback
Slipping on the icy ground of the cemetery, Brother Jerome smacks his head against the gravestone of Father Aloysius. His peers gave him a nice funeral but ironically buried him at the site in which he died.

When he first died, he briefly meets Aloysius who apologizes to Jerry, but that seem like a lifetime ago as Jerome finds the afterworld is void of anyone even angels except for Leo the friary cat, who is alive and well back in his former residence. Jerome is confused as there are no cherubs or angels with harps. Leo explains to Jerome that his real name is Quantum, but he can call him Quant and that it is easy to cross between the land of the living and the dead, which is why he resides here and at the friary. Simply Jerome must modify his belief system so that he can see and soon other spirits and doors to dimensions will be there. Of course coordinates are critical or else one can become the star of a painting or a branch of a tree.

JEROME AND THE SERAPH is a simple entertaining book that ironically connects complex topics (the afterlife, mythology, and quantum physics) into a wonderful fantasy that hooks readers from the moment Al and Jerry exchange a few words. The tale never lets go until Brother Jerome completes his journeys though Quant steals the show. Fans who appreciate an amusing with serious undertone adventure tale will appreciate Jerome Through the Looking Glass guided by Quant the Cheshire cat.

Harriet Klausner
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