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Jack and the Beanstalk Library Binding – Sep 20 1991


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Library Binding, Sep 20 1991
CDN$ 111.33 CDN$ 3.17

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Product Details

  • Library Binding: 48 pages
  • Publisher: HarperCollins Canada / Other (Sept. 20 1991)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0688102514
  • ISBN-13: 978-0688102517
  • Product Dimensions: 28.9 x 22.4 x 1.3 cm
  • Shipping Weight: 522 g
  • Average Customer Review: 4.4 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (5 customer reviews)


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First Sentence
There was, once upon a time, a poor widow who had an only son named Jack a cow named Milky-white. Read the first page
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Format: Paperback
I originally brought this version of Jack and the Beanstalk home from the library to see if my 4 year old grandson would like it--he loved it so much I purchased it. This version is similar to the one I remember growing up with, however, when I read it to him I eliminate/improvise over the sentences that I think are way too scarey for a small child (eating boys on toast for breakfast, broiling calves, etc.). Even tho I think the illustrations can be a little frightening for smaller children, he doesn't seem to be bothered by them. And, all children love "fee fi fo fum, etc." and like to be scared just a little bit.
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Format: Hardcover
I thought this version of the fairy tale was very well written. This is probably my favorite version out of the ones I have read before. It has been my favorite fairy tale since I was just a young little boy. I always liked to hear my mother and school teacher read the story out loud. My favorite part used to be when the ogre said, "Fee! Fi! Fo! Fum!" I remember when my kindergarten teacher used to walk around like a monster when she read that part. The pictures in this version are also a couple of the better ones I've seen in other versions of the fairy tale. I thought the author of the book was one of the best because he was pretty good at telling the tale and he also used detailed pictures. The pictures would be enough to scare little ones and make them laugh at the same time. The pictures were probably some of the better ones you will see in other versions of this fairy tale.
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Format: Hardcover
I read this book to my Pre-K class and they ask for it over and over again. The illustrations are good, kind of comical and scary at the same time. I enjoy reading this version because it stays true to the original language of the story :"Fee Fi Fo Fum, etc." You don't find this in every version.
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Format: Paperback
Kellogg's traditional tale interpretations are among the best. His illustrations take on the old-time feel of classic tales and seem to magically glow, as they do in all his books. I read this book to my Kindergarten class and they ask for it again and again. It is great to see them cover their eyes and ears at the scary moments--they are frightened, but smiling from ear to ear.
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0 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Ashley Jones on April 27 2004
Format: Paperback
Jack and the Beanstalk is a classic tale that will never be forgotten. It has withstood countless attempts to be revised and rewritten. Tales such as "Little Red Riding Hood," "Sleeping Beauty," and "Cinderella" have evolved greatly since their first versions. "Jack and the Beanstalk" unlike these other tales has kept its' original message and is still able to be a fairy tale that children of all ages can read and enjoy. After reading this fairy tale the message that I got from it is that from poverty can come great wealth it just depends on how you get it. I believe that this story is a magical story not being impressed on the minds of young children. Most children read this tale as a unrealistic journey that Jack has with the beanstalk and the enormous land above it. To me it is very unikely that a child would think it is okay to steal from others or run away from their problems as Jack did. Personally I think that the childs actions from this story are a result of the parents direction. If a parent does not show the child how this is wrong then the child may think that it is okay.
"Jack and the Beanstalk" serves to portray an ideological perspective similar to that of a liberalist view. That is being more outspoken, and not taking into account that little children may be reading the story. In no way would a conservative story display the rhyme of "I'll crush his bones to make my bread". Or the idea that stealing is okay. Many critics point out how stories can have a lasting impression on the minds of young children. Jack steals the objects in the story, an activity which could be teaching children that it is okay to steal. Perhaps it is a good idea that Jacobson put the fairy at the top of the beanstalk to let children know that stealing is wrong.
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